New Specialized Como SL

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
New Como SL is the latest use of the SL motor in Specialized line of bikes. I wonder if the demand is there. I can see that it's a good application for the Levo and Creo. But I wonder if Como buyers are interested in the lighter weight and willing to take less power as a trade off.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
I ride a como3 with the E series motor and battery. It is only about a pound heavier (46.5 lbs) with similar torque (45 - 50 nm) and range (40 - 50 miles).
Makes we wonder why the new model is called a SL in the first place, and why it costs an extra thousand dollars ...
 
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Rás Cnoic

Active Member
Does the Shimano geared hub account for the extra weight? I was wondering as it looks to be about 10lbs heavier then the Vado SL, but with identical motor & battery. It can't be all because of that basket!
 

lloose

Member
I'll be interested to see the market for this. $4000 starting price, belt drive, hub. I think the standard Como filled a niche with people who want a powerful cruiser/commuter. This feels like a very casual bike, and I don't know if people are going to want to pay $4000 for a casual bike. I could see it as a very premium commuter bike outside of the US though.
 

onlineaddy

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Turbo Como SL 5.0:


comosl.png
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
. I could see it as a very premium commuter bike outside of the US though.
Yes, in Eu they droll over Trek/Specialized/Cannondale/Giant, and here we crave Moustache Samedi's , R&M, Canyon, Gazelle, Bulls and Stromers
 

Edison20

New Member
I have a 2020 Como 4.0 with 5000 miles on it. The Como 5.0 SL is absolutely gorgeous. Given the shortage of bikes, the SL should sell well. The market is older people who have money and want an upright, relaxed ride. I just replaced my chain and rear cassette. The convenience of a belt drive and internal hub gears is worth it. It won't pay for itself, but it should last 10k miles. Aluminum fenders with tail light are a big improvement over my plastic fenders. But a 320 wh battery versus my removable 500 wh battery? If anything, I want an even bigger battery. I ride in eco mode and get 33 miles on flat terrain. I also replaced the tires with Armadillo tires because I was getting a lot flats, especially on the rear tire. And the aluminum fork is very stiff. I rode a Pedigo with a steel fork and it had a slight suspension feeling to it. Steel forks weight more which is why Specialized went with the aluminum fork.
 

Catalyzt

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Interesting points, all. The power-to-weight and range is tricky to figure-- it's so hard to know what you want, what you need, because low torque often means great range, but there is a point when it's almost impractical. I bet people will like the SL-- if they ever get a chance to ride it, and I haven't-- because it sounds it's probably light enough, and some buyers will compromise on price before compromising on weight. If your weight limit is 50 pounds, or 45, for a cruiser, there's usually a reason for it-- you don't want to lift it, put it on a rack, or your older, etc.-- and you often REALLY don't to exceed that, and if you can afford it, you'll sigh and pay more.

I just got a Motobecane Ultra eAdventure, and man, at 49 pounds and 40 Nm of torque from the Shimano E5000, it's right on the tipping point. It rides great, corners incredibly well, handles the criminally bad pavement here like it's nothing, and unbelievably stable going downhill at high speed-- there is no rattling of ANYthing. The Deore 10 shifts incredibly smoothly, I don't know how I've tolerated my acoustic bikes!

But low torque mid-drive is definitely playing with my head! On level grounds and medium hills, it's totally fine. As I get closer to the max incline around here, which seems to be 15%, I'm less sure... as I go up the hill, I keep thinking, "This isn't going to work, I'm gonna have to sell this bike in a year or two," (I'm 63) and then a few seconds later, "No, wait... I just wasn't in the right gear... or is it giving me more power now?" I get home from a ride and think, "That was more of a workout than my 40-pound hub drive on the same route," and then think, "Well, wait a minute, I'm not soaked in sweat, my legs aren't burning, maybe it just felt different."

The Moto, however, was only $2,000, and the build quality seems tremendous. It's gonna be great.... I think... well, maybe not... of course it is...

...and so on.
 

jodi2

Active Member
Yes, in Eu they droll over Trek/Specialized/Cannondale/Giant, and here we crave Moustache Samedi's , R&M, Canyon, Gazelle, Bulls and Stromers
Yes, there is a market for ebikes like a Como SL here in Europe. I would even say, lots of similiar strong urban bikes/ebikes here are terrible, as they are popular especially among women/mothers or older people but they are heavy (the bikes...).
One of the few light drive alternatives here in Germany/Europe is Fazua, but the few brands/models for women are still not that light when fully equipped and about the same weight as the Como SL with is it's strong frame&design. The Vado SL ST fully equipped is even lighter then most/all alternatives I know.

I don't see a general problem with range or battery capacity. Of course a heavy driver who always carries a lot of luggage and wants high motor support will not get far with a Como SL. But there are enough better choices with bigger battery for that use. But a small&light rider who carries just "normal" luggage and needs only average support will get good range with the Como SL even with only 320Wh.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Here is a more detailed review of the Turbo Como SL... ;)


The Turbo Como SL 5.0 starts at 45 lb (20.5 kg), which makes it one of the lightest weight full-featured upright city e-bikes.
While specialized’s other SL variants like the Turbo Vado SL weigh several pounds less, upright utility e-bikes are generally heavier by nature.
The Specialized Turbo Como SL is available starting today and comes in three frame sizes: Small, Medium and Large.
The Turbo Como SL 5.0 starts at $4,800, while the Turbo Como SL 4.0 is priced at $4,000.


21_ComoSL_2333.jpg


ComoSL_2576.jpg
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
I think airline weight limit for checked luggage is still 50 lbs including the packaging. This will just make it on weight.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Have you seen the Serial 1 bikes by Harley-Davidson? They're also going in this direction with an automatic-shifting CVT rear hub and belt drive for smoothness and less maintenance. An e-bike for people who want to ride one but without having to do things like learn how to shift, etc. But I think there's a market for it.
 

jodi2

Active Member
I see a relation/rivality to the normal Como or many other ebikes with heavy standard drives. But not to the Como SL, which is still a very light light ebike with an assist drive (I was able to see&touch/lift a Como SL on tuesday at my LBS...).
 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
I think airline weight limit for checked luggage is still 50 lbs including the packaging. This will just make it on weight.
If you ride the small without any additional accessories.

like this—translation only one place to get parts if they’re still making them, that is a unique experience.


Marco described how Specialized designs all of its own components so that they can have complete control over the smallest details that effect the rider experience and the feel of the bike. Even down to the physical holders of the battery cells, Specialized customizes everything to create that unique experience.

And my Vado and Como both weigh 57# in the Large size.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
My Como 3s are a small step thru and a medium diamond frame . They are both just under 50 lbs ready to ride with water bottle and tools, rack and fenders, lights and battery.
 

como813

New Member
New Como SL is the latest use of the SL motor in Specialized line of bikes. I wonder if the demand is there. I can see that it's a good application for the Levo and Creo. But I wonder if Como buyers are interested in the lighter weight and willing to take less power as a trade off.
sl are nice but once you ride the regular 4x you you won't want an SL. specialized up'd the game with como 4.0 and dropped the 5.0
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Well I think different people want different things. I really like the lightweight approach of my Creo and I don't need a motor twice as powerful. I think it makes more sense for a road bike though and hence my question if a typical Como buyer would value the lighter weight and be willing to take less power.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
A recent video (May 17th, 2021) from Specialized Warsaw (in Polish).
Just telling you I could see or even demo ride Como SL locally if I wanted.


Some of you were expressing doubt whether Como SL would find its buyers. In Europe for sure. I've just looked at the map; a long round trip along River Vistula in Warsaw just takes 40 km. If some people just need a little of recreation on weekends, or are commuting on weekdays, Como SL becomes interesting fashionable thing to own.

I was riding in Copenhagen last Summer. The distances in the capital city of Denmark are even shorter. My ride has been 12 km, and a share bike (traditional) was enough for me. Still, I had to make a steep climb next to the zoo and I regretted I had no motor on the bike at that very moment.