New Vados, Comos, and TERA!

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Tero, a hardtail? Very interesting. My Specialized stable is full for several years now, still it is good to see new developments!
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Tero, a hardtail? Very interesting. My Specialized stable is full for several years now, still it is good to see new developments!
i'm in the market for a super light hardtail MTB, but i'm guessing the tero is pretty heavy given the specs! maybe there's a Tero SL in the works :)
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Yep, about time for a motor lock. The Gates belt and "automatic shifter" are things new bike riders will be very interested in.
The non removable battery doesn't thrill me much, since it means bringing the whole bike inside to charge for people without a garage with electricity.
Don't imagine there are a lot of people without electricity in the shed or garage that aren't willing to add it if they are willing to spend the price for these bikes.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
Interesting features available such as Garmin rear-view radar (same as my Varia device) and what I believe is a different rack-mount "standard". Also a huge 710Wh battery. But nothing that dissuades me in the least from my purchase of a Vado SL 5.0 next year.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Rich, funny to say that but I have standardised on two Specialized ebikes and experience no issues with them. I assume your BMC is a Shimano ebike and I am glad you made an equally good choice.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Yep, about time for a motor lock. The Gates belt and "automatic shifter" are things new bike riders will be very interested in.
The non removable battery doesn't thrill me much, since it means bringing the whole bike inside to charge for people without a garage with electricity.
Don't imagine there are a lot of people without electricity in the shed or garage that aren't willing to add it if they are willing to spend the price for these bikes.
Creo, here, with no removable battery.

BUT a few months ago we were going to Eastern Washington and the first hotel accommodations we booked were a second floor unit and no elevator. So the tradeoffs were trust the public areas had electricity and security or schlepp the bike to the second floor up a pretty steep staircase. We changed to a different motel with a cabin. Sometimes choices and power can be limited. Now, again, the Creo is designed with an internal battery. But it could limit the audience.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Yeah the non removable battery would be an issue for me, but also commuters who can carry a battery upstairs to charge it, but not a whole bike
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Yeah the non removable battery would be an issue for me, but also commuters who can carry a battery upstairs to charge it, but not a whole bike
If I were in such a position, I would have bought me two or three Range Extenders 🙂
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Yeah the non removable battery would be an issue for me, but also commuters who can carry a battery upstairs to charge it, but not a whole bike
And you can't charge in extreme heat or cold AFAIK, so again that means bringing the bike inside to charge. Really a lot of trade offs. I suppose the advantage is that the battery is part of the structure of the bike, saving some weight.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Maybe it's marketing driven.
After all no one takes the batteries out of their Tesla to charge them, but the Tesla batteries are in a climate controlled environment.
There may be people who won't remove their batteries for any reason. I rarely do but I charge in a locked garage.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Maybe it's marketing driven.
After all no one takes the batteries out of their Tesla to charge them, but the Tesla batteries are in a climate controlled environment.
There may be people who won't remove their batteries for any reason. I rarely do but I charge in a locked garage.
it’s definitely a trade off of integration and weight. neither of my bikes (not my scooter) have removable batteries, but i’ve never once wanted to remove one. i live on the 6th floor, but the bikes stay in the basement parking garage, secured and plugged in as needed.

if the choice was a 2lb heavier but weaker bike with a fatter frame but a removable battery, i’d stick with the fixed battery. if there was no compromise, i suppose removable would be a nice plus.

when i get my creo fully upgraded to the minimum possible weight, i’m totally going to have the shop remove the battery and ride it with a range extender only to just as an experiment to see if it actually feels different. should be <25lb.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Maybe it's marketing driven.
After all no one takes the batteries out of their Tesla to charge them, but the Tesla batteries are in a climate controlled environment.
There may be people who won't remove their batteries for any reason. I rarely do but I charge in a locked garage.
I removed the battery from my converted electric bike just to make it lighter/easier to carry down a narrow set of basement stairs and then making a left turn into the doorway at the bottom. Same for getting it up and out. Hey, 6 or 7 pounds lighter makes a difference.