Nothing but smiles!!

Took deliver on a 17" Black ST2 this week and couldn't be happier. A couple issues right out of the gate. The soft power button was giving me grieve but a call and conversation with Joel Montecalvo the Stromer Service Manager and it turned out to be a wire in between the button and the Omni. It was great as he showed me how to get to the service menu and explained in detail what each setting accommodated. Another issue I'm having is that I can't get the headset tight. There is still some slop where the spacer (the one with the brake wire going down the fork leg) above the head tube and the head tube itself meet. A pretty noticeable amount of slop when riding that concerns me as it will elongate the head tube race over time. I tried multiple times loosing the stem and cranking down the steer tube cap to tighten it all up but no luck. I actually put a different steer tube cap on and that seems to tightened up a bit more but I still think it could be tighter. Any one else run into this??

Attached is a pick of this amazing bike. We finally had some sunshine here in Seattle today and did about 20 miles and was grinning from ear-to-ear the hole time! I did notice the surging others were referring too and with the custom config it all but eliminated it.

Stromer1.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Take it back to your purchasing dealer and have them tighten the headtube. Many times the compression shims in the steering head will move out of place. It is an easy fix but does require a skilled technician. DO NOT ride your bike until your steering headset is properly adjusted.

If you bought it from an out of state dealer be sure to notify them and strongly urge them to pay your local shop for any labor charges incurred.

On the surging, the most common cause of this is an uneven cadence. As you stated, a change to the torque setting can overcome this issue.

Make sure you torque all bolts to specifications and be sure that your crankset is properly greased, that your rotors are straight and not rubbing at all, that you have proper brake grip pressure, and that your gearset is properly adjusted by someone who knows what they are doing. And be sure to grease your seatpost well. If your seat keeps slipping relube with a carbon grip compound used for carbon seat posts. The final check is to make sure your spokes are all properly tensioned and that your wheel spins without any wobble. If you notice a wobble, get your wheels trued as well.

Shame on the dealer for not making sure that the bike was setup properly.

Lastly,
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I also noticed your have a body float seat. Be sure you properly adjust the sag to get the most out of your seatpost. Enjoy your ride!
 
Take it back to your purchasing dealer and have them tighten the headtube. Many times the compression shims in the steering head will move out of place. It is an easy fix but does require a skilled technician. DO NOT ride your bike until your steering headset is properly adjusted.

If you bought it from an out of state dealer be sure to notify them and strongly urge them to pay your local shop for any labor charges incurred.

On the surging, the most common cause of this is an uneven cadence. As you stated, a change to the torque setting can overcome this issue.

Make sure you torque all bolts to specifications and be sure that your crankset is properly greased, that your rotors are straight and not rubbing at all, that you have proper brake grip pressure, and that your gearset is properly adjusted by someone who knows what they are doing. And be sure to grease your seatpost well. If your seat keeps slipping relube with a carbon grip compound used for carbon seat posts. The final check is to make sure your spokes are all properly tensioned and that your wheel spins without any wobble. If you notice a wobble, get your wheels trued as well.

Shame on the dealer for not making sure that the bike was setup properly.

Lastly,
BTW - I've used one of these compression steertubes shims before on a previous bike I built up. I know they can be a bit finicky. Not sure what you are referring to when you said grease the crankset? As for brakes - I did have to do a bit of adjusting but have had hydraulic disc brakes on my last 3 bikes so skilled at dealing with them. I even have bleed kit for the maguras. :) And derailleur tuning is a no brain for me these days and they weren't set up to bad. Had to adjust the upper gear throw of the front a bit. I also have a truing stand but the wheels seem to be pretty well built. I'll probably check them after a hundred miles of riding or so to see how the tension is holding up. Thanks for your feedback - much appreciated.
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
You sound very skilled. Most of the folks here who get a bike online (especially one as advanced at the ST2) just put the handlebars on and ride. Crankset is the combo front gear assembly, thru axle, and arms you attach the pedals to. The threads need to be greased and torqued properly. Most factories do an OK job and most shops don't check.
 
You sound very skilled. Most of the folks here who get a bike online (especially one as advanced at the ST2) just put the handlebars on and ride. Crankset is the combo front gear assembly, thru axle, and arms you attach the pedals to. The threads need to be greased and torqued properly. Most factories do an OK job and most shops don't check.
That is kind of what I thought you were referring to - thanks. Making sure everything is greased properly is a very really concern here in the NW where we have to ride in the wet so much. And I've got a nice Park torque wrench that gets used a lot. :) I've been a bike enthusiast for years and use to race mt bikes so I've definitely done my share of bike builds. I even years back purchased a shop grade bike stand as the fold up versions just where not cutting it.

But this headset is baffling me as it just won't tighten. I'm may just have to take it to a shop as I just can't figure out what is restricting the compression cap from tightening it all down. There is a LOT going on with the ST2 fork/headtube/headset setup - especially with the brake line running through it. Aheadset can at times be finicky and checking them for tightest is something most cycles neglect. Gone are the days with the good old lock nut headsets.

Attached is a pic of my other commuter - Gates Belt drive / Rohloff 12 speed hub / Schmidt dyno front hub / Woody wood custom fenders / Jones H-Bars / Thudbuster post just to name a few of the goodies. :) Yes I'm a bit bike obsessed.
 

Attachments

  • 20141031-IMG_8676_edited-1.jpg
    20141031-IMG_8676_edited-1.jpg
    800.4 KB · Views: 108
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Really beautiful bike.....The reason I know about the shims is due to an installation of a Sta-Fast suspension stem for which I did a review. I'd suggest just replacing the compression plug. We had to tip the bike over and nudge out the original shims. I know you know this but tighten your headset JUST until it doesn't move (I place my fingers over the fork joint, grab a brake and jiggle the bike) Please don't over tighten.
 
Really beautiful bike.....The reason I know about the shims is due to an installation of a Sta-Fast suspension stem for which I did a review. I'd suggest just replacing the compression plug. We had to tip the bike over and nudge out the original shims. I know you know this but tighten your headset JUST until it doesn't move (I place my fingers over the fork joint, grab a brake and jiggle the bike) Please don't over tighten.
Ya I get how to tighten and you definitely don't want to over tighten as it will bind up the headset. As long as you don't back the allen screw out all the way the compression shims back off and you can simply slip out the whole thing. I tried utilizing a second one I had for a 1 1/8 head tube and still have the same results. Something is keeping the whole headset assembly from compressing and I'm baffled what it is. Grrrrrhhhh
 
Really beautiful bike.....The reason I know about the shims is due to an installation of a Sta-Fast suspension stem for which I did a review. I'd suggest just replacing the compression plug. We had to tip the bike over and nudge out the original shims. I know you know this but tighten your headset JUST until it doesn't move (I place my fingers over the fork joint, grab a brake and jiggle the bike) Please don't over tighten.
SUCCESS!! I put the bike up on the stand, took the front wheel off, removed the compression cap, tapped on the headset components a bit with a rubber mallet, put the stem back on and tightened it down. That did the trick!

Checked out your Stafast stem review. It is a really nicely built stem and seen some positive review besides yours. Once another $350 when it comes to the price of this bike. :)~ It is quite amazing how much harsher the rides feels compared to my other bikes but I think it is the speeds I'm hitting. This thing really moves. I've got a really steep hill next to my house and I'm just floored how fast I can pull it now... Amazing!!