ongoing Derailleur issue. Haibike 2016 sduro. 1x9

brucecava

New Member
Region
USA
All,
if anyone has any suggestions on this issue I would love some help.
I have a 2016 haibike. Sduro with Yamaha mid drive. I have been through four derailleurs in two years. It's always the same problem, they bend and break on me. I am not a racer but I do ride fairly hard. After the second broken derailleur I started asking people what is the hands-down best derailleur that I can get (money is not an issue). Some people said I should stick with Shimano, but they have bent on me as well. Some suggested something called a "box component" derailleur. I have tried a few bike shops around my area and they have told me that the 1x9 sprocket system definitely limits the amount of derailleurs available to me. Currently, I have an Advent which seems to be the best yet, however, I have had to bend it back myself twice already.
It's really weird because I don't thrash the bike, I don't wreck into boulders, and I'm not speeding through the woods at 15 to 20 miles an hour. Does anybody have any suggestions as to the highest quality derailleur available in 1X9?
I do climb pretty steep hills but I don't think torquing the chain with a steep hill climb is going to bend a derailleur. It just seems like I can't find something that is solid and built sturdy. Please reach out with suggestions, recommendations, or jibber jabber about derailleurs available in 1x9.
Thanks for your time
Bruce
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
All,
if anyone has any suggestions on this issue I would love some help.
I have a 2016 haibike. Sduro with Yamaha mid drive. I have been through four derailleurs in two years. It's always the same problem, they bend and break on me. I am not a racer but I do ride fairly hard. After the second broken derailleur I started asking people what is the hands-down best derailleur that I can get (money is not an issue). Some people said I should stick with Shimano, but they have bent on me as well. Some suggested something called a "box component" derailleur. I have tried a few bike shops around my area and they have told me that the 1x9 sprocket system definitely limits the amount of derailleurs available to me. Currently, I have an Advent which seems to be the best yet, however, I have had to bend it back myself twice already.
It's really weird because I don't thrash the bike, I don't wreck into boulders, and I'm not speeding through the woods at 15 to 20 miles an hour. Does anybody have any suggestions as to the highest quality derailleur available in 1X9?
I do climb pretty steep hills but I don't think torquing the chain with a steep hill climb is going to bend a derailleur. It just seems like I can't find something that is solid and built sturdy. Please reach out with suggestions, recommendations, or jibber jabber about derailleurs available in 1x9.
Thanks for your time
Bruce
Get the Box Blue with its specific shifter. Put a DHAG II on the hanger first. That is the real cause of the problem. The hanger is tweaked. Replacing a derailleur with out this adjustment, will not help. Might as well install a new cassette and chain at the same time.
1645572566381.jpeg
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
Google Box derailleur, they also make an 11/50 9spd cassette, and get your der. hanger checked for alignment.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
What do you mean when you say you "bent" your derailleur? Most likely, it is the derailleur hanger that gets bent.

It's easy to straighten and/or replace the hanger using the tool mentioned above by PedalUma. It's easy to use and takes just minutes.

There are also aftermarket derailleur hangers designed for heavy duty use that could solve your problem. I would check that option first before spending big $$ on a fancy derailleur.

Try looking here: https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/collections/derailleur-hangers-and-parts?page=1&rb_vendor=Shimano
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
A question, Bruce. Do you ever put the bike on the drive-side (the right side) when not riding?
 

brucecava

New Member
Region
USA
thanks for the replies. very helpful. I have mounted a kick stand so I dont lay the bike down ever. When traveling it is hanging upright on a thule car mount.
here is a photo to show where the bending occurs regularly. the two wheels on the derailleur end up not lining up, the lower one gets twisted and is out of alignment with the top wheel. Strangely enough the hanger has not bent much. the hangar has been replaced once and that was with one of the new derailleurs. I check the hangar regularly and it seems not to be the issue. it seems the construction of the bar between the two wheels on the derailleur is made cheaply and very easy to bend and twist. Hence the question, is there a better made derailleur with a more solid construction, maybe with heavier steel that resists bending and twisting.
 

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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
That's very strange. The part you show is the chain cage tensioner, As long as the chain is adjusted properly, it's under no stress at all when you pedal. Are you sure you aren't stressing it some other way like striking the ground during a turn or while transporting the bike?
 
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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Since you have a single cog in front, you may not need that much chain slack. It may be possible to use a shorter cage, which in theory would be stronger. It might require removing a few chain links. I don't know if Shimano makes one for a 1x9 derailleur though.
 

brucecava

New Member
Region
USA
is it possible....maybe... that the torque on the chain is making it twist under the power? Its an ebike and I climb some steep hills with it on full power.
I like the idea of a shorter length . I will look into a shorter derailleur. I think BOX makes one. I had the shimano XT and it bent badly and I was always having to twist it back to normal. but, of course, each time i do it im thinking, yeah..im weakening this metal. a shorter one is a good idea if i can find one. very few options with a 1x9
Bruce
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
is it possible....maybe... that the torque on the chain is making it twist under the power? Its an ebike and I climb some steep hills with it on full power.
I like the idea of a shorter length . I will look into a shorter derailleur. I think BOX makes one. I had the shimano XT and it bent badly and I was always having to twist it back to normal. but, of course, each time i do it im thinking, yeah..im weakening this metal. a shorter one is a good idea if i can find one. very few options with a 1x9
Bruce
You will be happier with the long cage Box. You will get a greater range of gears. Its clutch is very good at removing slack.
 

brucecava

New Member
Region
USA
I am pretty sure it has bent on me with general riding. But there has been whacks to it which I know have caused some bending in past. I am very careful with transporting it. I use a kickstand so its never on the side. I would love to find a shorter throw derailleur. Have not been successful at finding another shorter one yet.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
I have the same Shimano XT Long Cage rear derailleur on my own 2016 Haibike Full FatSix. It's a top tier derailleur that hasn't given me a lick of trouble. I replaced the first one after 11 thousand miles just for the heck of it as I needed to replace a severely worn front chain ring and stretched chain. On the newer chain, front chain ring and second rear derailleur, I am working on closing on 17000 total miles.

derail2.jpg

I look at your picture here and I believe just by what I see here, you are in 2nd gear and the derailleur body (the black portion) is riding FAR too close to the cassette cluster. If you were to shift into first gear (the biggest rear cog), it does appear that the derailleur is going to hit the cassette.

Please follow the below Park Tools video on setting your rear derailleur. Set the limit screws and the "B" adjustment screw according to the video. Check the clutch to ensure it is loose when it is set to off, and tight to when the clutch is engaged. Often, the internal spring can rust or get bound up with gunk and dirt and needs to be cleaned. If the high or low adjustments are off, it can throw the derailleur into the cassette, damaging it; or it can throw the chain completely off. If the B adjustment is off, the top derailleur cog can collide with the #9 cassette cog, damaging the entire derailleur. I do wonder if this is what is happening.

Fine tune the rear derailleur and I do believe you will be fine. No need to reinvent the wheel with a short cage or another derailleur brand. The XT is a good one. Ensure your existing derailleur cages are not bent, if in doubt, replace. Carefully look at that hangar and ensure the derailleur is mounted properly onto it. Make sure the chain is not stretched, if in doubt, replace. Ditto the front chain ring if you have high miles and teeth wear in the chain ring.

Link:
 
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PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
I have the same Shimano XT Long Cage rear derailleur on my own 2016 Haibike Full FatSix. It's a top tier derailleur that hasn't given me a lick of trouble. I replaced the first one after 11 thousand miles just for the heck of it as I needed to replace a severely worn front chain ring and stretched chain. On the newer chain, front chain ring and second rear derailleur, I am working on closing on 17000 total miles.

View attachment 115642
I look at your picture here and I believe just by what I see here, you are in 2nd gear and the derailleur body (the black portion) is riding FAR too close to the cassette cluster. If you were to shift into first gear (the biggest rear cog), it does appear that the derailleur is going to hit the cassette.

Please follow the below Park Tools video on setting your rear derailleur. Set the limit screws and the "B" adjustment screw according to the video. Check the clutch to ensure it is loose when it is set to off, and tight to when the clutch is engaged. Often, the internal spring can rust or get bound up with gunk and dirt and needs to be cleaned. If the high or low adjustments are off, it can throw the derailleur into the cassette, damaging it; or it can throw the chain completely off. If the B adjustment is off, the top derailleur cog can collide with the #9 cassette cog, damaging the entire derailleur. I do wonder if this is what is happening.

Fine tune the rear derailleur and I do believe you will be fine. No need to reinvent the wheel with a short cage or another derailleur brand. The XT is a good one. Ensure your existing derailleur cages are not bent, if in doubt, replace. Carefully look at that hangar and ensure the derailleur is mounted properly onto it. Make sure the chain is not stretched, if in doubt, replace. Ditto the front chain ring if you have high miles and teeth wear in the chain ring.

Link:
That is correct about the B screw, and the chain is a bit too long. The lower tensioner pully is vertical to the cage. It should be under greater tension and at a forward angle. It is as if a 116 L chain was installed on a 114 set-up. Good eye Mike!
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
That is correct about the B screw, and the chain is a bit too long. The lower tensioner pully is vertical to the cage. It should be under greater tension and at a forward angle. It is as if a 116 L chain was installed on a 114 set-up. Good eye Mike!
Thanks, PedalUma. Bruce, as for @PedalUma 's advice about chain length, again reference that Park Tool youtube library of videos. I recall one where Calvin Jones or one of the other Park folks show you how to check for a proper length chain.
 

brucecava

New Member
Region
USA
WOW! That sounds like it just might be what is happening. I will make sure I watch those videos. If I understand correctly the body of derailleur should be farther from the smallest cog of the cassette. Is there a good average measurement for distance between them in the lowest gear?
good catch! thank you.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
WOW! That sounds like it just might be what is happening. I will make sure I watch those videos. If I understand correctly the body of derailleur should be farther from the smallest cog of the cassette. Is there a good average measurement for distance between them in the lowest gear?
good catch! thank you.
Bruce, in the video you will find how Calvin Jones sets up the proper B adjustment for the derailleur body. Just follow everything he does, recheck your adjustments a few times before moving onto the next adjustment. Keep in mind, if the hanger is bent inward or outward from normal, no amount of derailluer adjustments will ever be correct!!!!

Beforehand, everything must start with a straight derailleur hanger, with a smooth, undamaged derailleur mounted properly on it. Good shift cable, too. From there, it's just following Calvin's work, step by step.

A good local bike shop could knock this all out for you in short time at minimal cost. But doing it yourself gives one a measure of self-satisfaction of "I can do this, too."

Check out the other Park videos about the derailleur, chain, etc. That site is a gold mine of great bike repair information.

Let us know how it works out for you.

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Poor man's bike stand.....after replacing my front chain ring, chain and new rear derailleur, I needed to set the High/Low and B adjustments according to Park's video. Instead of investing in an expensive bike stand, I just used a 3 dollar Harbor Freight strap and used it on my homebuilt boat's tarp frame (made of 3 inch pvc pipe). Ran it under my saddle and raised the rear tire off the ground. You want the back tire up in order to make your adjustments while shifting on the fly. Use your eyes, use your ears. Your ears will know everything is perfect when everything is whirring along with no clicks or clacks, just a nice, smooth whirring motion.

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2016 Haibike Full FatSix, Shimano XT derailleur with chain tension clutch. If your cages are bent, replace them. They are available at online bike suppliers.

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Myself, I'm a forgetful sort anymore. So I write stuff down, like directions to get here or there. Or directions on how to adjust the derailleur in accordance with the Park video. End result, the new derailleur and chain & front chain ring shifted and worked like a charm. If I could pull it off, no doubt, you can too!