Orbea Gain D50 ( User learning and experiences )

AntonioAlfaro

Member
Region
Other
Battery Extender
Continuing with the experiences and learning of the Orbea Gain D50, I have come to the conclusion that it will not be bad to have a battery extension system. We have optimized the administration of the energy available in the main battery to the maximum, we have gotten physically fit, we have reduced our mass and that of the ebike as much as possible, but now we want to make long-lasting and more demanding routes, and always count on our support levels.
It is in these cases where we need an additional battery.
Mahle/Orbea has developed its own battery extender, and I'll start by summarizing its features:
Total capacity: 208.8W/h (5.8A)
Voltage: 36 V
Cells: Panasonic
Charging time: 3 hours
Maximum discharge ratio: 1.9 A
Water resistance: IP57
Color: Anodized black
Charging and ignition display: Iwoc One button Charging port protected by a rubber cover.
Dual charging: The Range Extender and main battery can be charged at the same time by connecting the Range Extender to the main battery and the X35 charger to the Range Extender.
Certifications: EN 15194.2017 Bicycle mounting: Specific X35 bottle holder with Quick Lock rubber band. Exclusive mounting on the seat tube *(diagonal tube on the Optima).
Weight: 1645 g with bottle holde
1647902052263.png

The Mahle Range Extender works like a portable internal battery charger that charges the main battery while it is turned on. It operates differently from other systems in that on the Ebikemotion X35, only the main battery provides power to the motor, while the Range Extender charges the main battery, regardless of whether the motor demands current from the main battery or not (such as at speeds greater than 25 km/h, when there is no pedaling or the bicycle is not moving).
The Range Extender provides charge to the main battery at a discharge ratio of 2A, while the motor can demand current of up to 9A. Therefore, the Range Extender is not capable of supplying enough current to the motor by itself, and all this current comes from the main battery.

So far so good and very nice, but 1) the price of this battery extender is extremely high 2) they are not available on the market today.
This has motivated many desperate enthusiasts like me to look for a DIY solution.
Of all that I have read and seen on the web, Yako's experiments (see attached YouTube link) are the ones that have shown a functional and tested DIY system.
I'm going to stop at this point, and I would like to know your opinions, experiences and comments in general.
Will continue...
 

ngg

Member
Region
Europe
Battery Extender
Continuing with the experiences and learning of the Orbea Gain D50, I have come to the conclusion that it will not be bad to have a battery extension system. We have optimized the administration of the energy available in the main battery to the maximum, we have gotten physically fit, we have reduced our mass and that of the ebike as much as possible, but now we want to make long-lasting and more demanding routes, and always count on our support levels.
It is in these cases where we need an additional battery.
Mahle/Orbea has developed its own battery extender, and I'll start by summarizing its features:
Total capacity: 208.8W/h (5.8A)
Voltage: 36 V
Cells: Panasonic
Charging time: 3 hours
Maximum discharge ratio: 1.9 A
Water resistance: IP57
Color: Anodized black
Charging and ignition display: Iwoc One button Charging port protected by a rubber cover.
Dual charging: The Range Extender and main battery can be charged at the same time by connecting the Range Extender to the main battery and the X35 charger to the Range Extender.
Certifications: EN 15194.2017 Bicycle mounting: Specific X35 bottle holder with Quick Lock rubber band. Exclusive mounting on the seat tube *(diagonal tube on the Optima).
Weight: 1645 g with bottle holde
View attachment 117441
The Mahle Range Extender works like a portable internal battery charger that charges the main battery while it is turned on. It operates differently from other systems in that on the Ebikemotion X35, only the main battery provides power to the motor, while the Range Extender charges the main battery, regardless of whether the motor demands current from the main battery or not (such as at speeds greater than 25 km/h, when there is no pedaling or the bicycle is not moving).
The Range Extender provides charge to the main battery at a discharge ratio of 2A, while the motor can demand current of up to 9A. Therefore, the Range Extender is not capable of supplying enough current to the motor by itself, and all this current comes from the main battery.

So far so good and very nice, but 1) the price of this battery extender is extremely high 2) they are not available on the market today.
This has motivated many desperate enthusiasts like me to look for a DIY solution.
Of all that I have read and seen on the web, Yako's experiments (see attached YouTube link) are the ones that have shown a functional and tested DIY system.
I'm going to stop at this point, and I would like to know your opinions, experiences and comments in general.
Will continue...

According to your data, you achieved (before changing the tires) an average consumption of less than 1.5 watts / km. I expect that now (with the new tires) your average consumption is close to 1 watt / km. This means that the basic battery was enough for a tour of between 150-170 km before changing the tires, and now after replacing the tires for tours between 220 and 250 km. In either case, you will be left with enough watts in the battery to return safely.

With an average speed of around 22 km / h, this means that your basic battery is enough for 10 hours of cycling, without the need for recharging. So, if you are going to ride for over 10 hours without the possibility of recharging the battery, you absolutely need a Battery Extender. However, it is not cardiologically recommended to ride a bicycle for more than 4 hours at a time. Practically over 7-8 hours a day is not the smartest thing to ride a bike.

By the way, why did you reduce the weight of the bike at all and increase the cost, if you are going to replace it all now with the Battery Extender?!
 

AntonioAlfaro

Member
Region
Other
According to your data, you achieved (before changing the tires) an average consumption of less than 1.5 watts / km. I expect that now (with the new tires) your average consumption is close to 1 watt / km. This means that the basic battery was enough for a tour of between 150-170 km before changing the tires, and now after replacing the tires for tours between 220 and 250 km. In either case, you will be left with enough watts in the battery to return safely.

With an average speed of around 22 km / h, this means that your basic battery is enough for 10 hours of cycling, without the need for recharging. So, if you are going to ride for over 10 hours without the possibility of recharging the battery, you absolutely need a Battery Extender. However, it is not cardiologically recommended to ride a bicycle for more than 4 hours at a time. Practically over 7-8 hours a day is not the smartest thing to ride a bike.

By the way, why did you reduce the weight of the bike at all and increase the cost, if you are going to replace it all now with the Battery Extender?!
hi ngg,
Thanks for your comments. Maybe I wasn't clear enough, but let me say that battery extender should be considered only in very particular cases. In no way am I proposing that the extender is necessary for everyone, nor that it should always be installed on the bike.
It is an implement that can be useful if we want to do a very steep and long-lasting route that would be impossible to achieve with the normal battery of the Ebike.
Agree with you, It makes no sense to add 1.5Kg more mass (extender) if our routes do not require more battery autonomy.
 

PlanBee

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
I think Mahle is optimized at 70 RPM. That has been written before. With this cadence, it is easiest to ride a bike.

I think Mahle is optimized at 70 RPM. That has been written before. With this cadence, it is easiest to ride a bike.
Interesting chat, which I barely understand TBH!

But if the above is true it must mean that the X35 has a cadence sensor (of the pedals, not the hub). Is that true?
 

AntonioAlfaro

Member
Region
Other
Interesting chat, which I barely understand TBH!

But if the above is true it must mean that the X35 has a cadence sensor (of the pedals, not the hub). Is
Hi Plan Bee,
There has to be a way to sense the pedaling to activate the motor when the assist is on. What I can't say is if the internal RPM reading (not the rider's cadence) is part of the motor control algorithm (probably it is).
The truth is that when you use the assistance and you reach about 70 rpm on the crank, you will feel that the system is more fluid and smooth.