Over 50's Trek Allant 9.9s Chronicles

Over50

Well-Known Member
...Does the Allant take a front suspension fork and a rear rack ?
The carbon Allants do not take a suspension fork. The aluminum do. Not sure about rear rack. The pannier rack is integrated w the fender so would probably require some retro fit on fenders and rear lighting.
 

emtbdude

Member
It seems performance is disappointing in several respects.

I've ridden a 2018 Gazelle CityZen Speed with claimed 28 mph top speed. I didn't test it for top speed but it pulled with ridiculous torque on moderate grade climbs up to 15 to 18 mph with modest effort. The motor was amazing in the mid range of the power band up to 22 mph or so.

This 2020 motor sounds like it's detuned. Is it optimized for range? It sounds like you are not getting great range, either. It sounds like both power and range are compromised for whatever reason.

What is your cadence while riding? Most mid drives are optimized to deliver peak power at around 90 rpm. At lower cadence, particularly around 70 rpm or lower, power drops off rapidly. The same is true at very high cadences say 110 or above.

This bike appears to be over-engineered for esthetics and a bit under-engineered for performance, assuming you are in the proper cadence range.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
How are you liking the handlebar, @Over50?
Does it replace the shockstop-suspension stem?
Well I can say I really didn't have any hand or shoulder discomfort on my commute. I can feel some slight give in the bar. It is nowhere near the suspension effect of the Redshift stem. I would say it is vibration dampening but not shock absorbing if that makes sense. The Redshift I put on my regular bike flexes more. I would like to be slightly more upright so I wish they had a trekking bar w just a bit more rise (if that is the right term). I'm not regretting buying the Baramind at all. It is a good alternative from what I can tell thus far.
 
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emtbdude

Member
The redshift suspension stem is designed primarily for road bike use; it exploits the additional leverage of the hoods and drop positions. They are not as effective when you ride on the tops of the bars. This is why they are less effective on bikes with flat bars with less reach. I suppose you could counter the leverage disadvantage by using softer elastomers.

The redshift stem works beautifully on road bikes, offering greater compliance without compromising efficiency in any way. As a matter of fact, it's possible you will be slightly faster with the redshift stem.

It's not really clear what the best alternative is in this case with a bike that can't accept a suspension fork (a major oversight). A plastic frame can only go so far to smooth road bumps. Smaller irregularities, sure, but potholes are still going to announce their presence rather forcibly in your you know what.

The combination of a flex handlebar, plastic frame and perhaps lower psi tires could all help. I do like how the matte black fork integrates with the frame esthetically but I'd rather have an ugly suspension fork rather than a pretty rigid one on rough roads.

Another significant issue iw with frame design, namely the very high standover. Even the step thru has plenty of room for a second battery mount. The stepover has a ludicrously high top tube and there's really no functional reason for it.

There is definitely significant room for improvement in a rev2 or 3 and beyond.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
The redshift suspension stem is designed primarily for road bike use; it exploits the additional leverage of the hoods and drop positions. They are not as effective when you ride on the tops of the bars. This is why they are less effective on bikes with flat bars with less reach....
I've found the Redshift to be a miracle-add on my steel-framed Spot Champa (flat bar). If I had known in advance how much it would have improved my ride, I would have been willing to pay twice the price.
42013
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Kinekt in place but no opportunity to get out and fine tune yet. Crappy, blustery weather today.

42062
 
Since I returned my Stromer ST5 due to unacceptable reliability, I'm looking for an alternative and stopped by my local Trek LBS to test the new Allant+ 9.9S (Medium size, though I a Large would have been a better fit for me). My test ride was limited to circling a few times within a cul-de-sac street next to the LBS; that was nonetheless helpful to give me a sense of key differences between the ST5 and the Allant+ 9.9S from my perspective:
  • Allant+ 9.9S is easy to lift safely with a single arm without much of second thought for body placement; lifting the ST5 safely requires two arms and proper body position. Several factors contribute to this difference: carbon vs. aluminium frame & fork; battery size/weight and motor power/weight; wheel size/weight. The lighter weight of the Allant+ 9.9S is attractive; however, it is unclear to me how well it will handle over time; particularly w.r.t. bumps and stress due to loads (person; loaded panniers).
  • The rear light (Trek Lync) is tiny but it blinks brightly; the ST5 has a Supernova rear light with 5 small leds. It is difficult to tell which is more visible from a distance. I suspect the Trek Lync's larger and brighter lens is more effective than the ST5's leds.
  • No brake light function. This is a big disappointment because it means that there is no motor power cutoff when braking. On the ST5, applying the brakes cuts off the motor even if one is still pedaling.
  • The Shimano index shifter is very loud -- one can hear a distinct "klunk" . The LBS told me they noticed this across all new Allant models and adjustment attempts have been ineffective at resolving this. This sound doesn't inspire confidence for me. In contrast, shifting with ST5 Shimano DI, when done properly, produces a satisfying buttery smooth experience devoid of unpleasant chain/cassette noise with a barely audible indication from the electrical shifting actuator.
  • The Allant+ 9.9S feels very sluggish even in the highest Turbo assistance level. For comparison, the ST5 tuned for max sensitivity felt a bit more sluggish than the ST2 tuned for max sensitivity. The difference is in a big part due to the larger wheel size on the ST5 compared to the ST2. The ST2 is by far the most responsive ebike I've used to handle aggressive urban environments. The Allant+ 9.9S responsiveness is definitely well below that of ST5 and somewhere above that of my old Grace MXII Urban (Bosch Gen2 w/ Gates & NuVinci hub).
  • The rear rack of the Allant+ 9.9S has a single attachment point to the chassis. Having recently watched the video of the WattWagons Ultra Commuter Pro's design that emphasized the importance of dual attachment points, it is unclear to me how well this design will perform on a carbon frame.
Overall, I'm glad to have had the opportunity of testing the Allant+ 9.9S ebike. With a $400 rebate at the LBS, it's nearly half the price of the Stromer ST5. For my needs, I wouldn't feel safe riding this bike for my commuting needs -- the carbon frame, drivetrain and brake design seems too fragile and too disconnected to me: I need a sturdy, reliable, robust, integrated urban commuter mule. The salvation on this bike is the easy access to the network of Trek LBS for maintenance/support.

- Nicolas.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Since I returned my Stromer ST5 due to unacceptable reliability, I'm looking for an alternative and stopped by my local Trek LBS to test the new Allant+ 9.9S (Medium size, though I a Large would have been a better fit for me). My test ride was limited to circling a few times within a cul-de-sac street next to the LBS; that was nonetheless helpful to give me a sense of key differences between the ST5 and the Allant+ 9.9S from my perspective:
  • Allant+ 9.9S is easy to lift safely with a single arm without much of second thought for body placement; lifting the ST5 safely requires two arms and proper body position. Several factors contribute to this difference: carbon vs. aluminium frame & fork; battery size/weight and motor power/weight; wheel size/weight. The lighter weight of the Allant+ 9.9S is attractive; however, it is unclear to me how well it will handle over time; particularly w.r.t. bumps and stress due to loads (person; loaded panniers).
  • The rear light (Trek Lync) is tiny but it blinks brightly; the ST5 has a Supernova rear light with 5 small leds. It is difficult to tell which is more visible from a distance. I suspect the Trek Lync's larger and brighter lens is more effective than the ST5's leds.
  • No brake light function. This is a big disappointment because it means that there is no motor power cutoff when braking. On the ST5, applying the brakes cuts off the motor even if one is still pedaling.
  • The Shimano index shifter is very loud -- one can hear a distinct "klunk" . The LBS told me they noticed this across all new Allant models and adjustment attempts have been ineffective at resolving this. This sound doesn't inspire confidence for me. In contrast, shifting with ST5 Shimano DI, when done properly, produces a satisfying buttery smooth experience devoid of unpleasant chain/cassette noise with a barely audible indication from the electrical shifting actuator.
  • The Allant+ 9.9S feels very sluggish even in the highest Turbo assistance level. For comparison, the ST5 tuned for max sensitivity felt a bit more sluggish than the ST2 tuned for max sensitivity. The difference is in a big part due to the larger wheel size on the ST5 compared to the ST2. The ST2 is by far the most responsive ebike I've used to handle aggressive urban environments. The Allant+ 9.9S responsiveness is definitely well below that of ST5 and somewhere above that of my old Grace MXII Urban (Bosch Gen2 w/ Gates & NuVinci hub).
  • The rear rack of the Allant+ 9.9S has a single attachment point to the chassis. Having recently watched the video of the WattWagons Ultra Commuter Pro's design that emphasized the importance of dual attachment points, it is unclear to me how well this design will perform on a carbon frame.
Overall, I'm glad to have had the opportunity of testing the Allant+ 9.9S ebike. With a $400 rebate at the LBS, it's nearly half the price of the Stromer ST5. For my needs, I wouldn't feel safe riding this bike for my commuting needs -- the carbon frame, drivetrain and brake design seems too fragile and too disconnected to me: I need a sturdy, reliable, robust, integrated urban commuter mule. The salvation on this bike is the easy access to the network of Trek LBS for maintenance/support.

- Nicolas.
You should have checked or researched the BH Nitro city 2018/2019 model. That is by far the most reliable and responsive speed pedelec out there .


At only 3.499 or 4k after taxes/accessories is a great deal. Unfortunately they don’t make those for 2020 so if you are really , really lucky to find one I will suggest to get it.
605wh pack, 860watts peak , 32mph top speed(52t), rear rack. Tektro Dorado(brake cutoff), Deore Xt.

Thinking back when i 1st got it, even if this bike was 7 grand knowing what I know now about this capability the reliability and exceptional tech support of BH i will have paid 7k.

Ps - mine is definitely not for sale, i am actuAlly buying a 2nd for winter. All experienced mechanics i have talked too told me that this one is much more faster than a Strawman..stromer i meant 😉
 

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You should have checked or researched the BH Nitro city 2018/2019 model. That is by far the most reliable and responsive speed pedelec out there .


At only 3.499 or 4k after taxes/accessories is a great deal. Unfortunately they don’t make those for 2020 so if you are really , really lucky to find one I will suggest to get it.
605wh pack, 860watts peak , 32mph top speed(52t), rear rack. Tektro Dorado(brake cutoff), Deore Xt.

Thinking back when i 1st got it, even if this bike was 7 grand knowing what I know now about this capability the reliability and exceptional tech support of BH i will have paid 7k.

Ps - mine is definitely not for sale, i am actuAlly buying a 2nd for winter. All experienced mechanics i have talked too told me that this one is much more faster than a Strawman..stromer i meant 😉
Thanks for the info. I'm glad the BH Nitro City is a wonderful bike for you. My recent test drive of a Trek Allant+ 9.9S w/ the Shimano Deore XT derailleur left me unimpressed. How could a shifting mechanism so violent as to produce a loud "klunk" be reliable in the long term?
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the info. I'm glad the BH Nitro City is a wonderful bike for you. My recent test drive of a Trek Allant+ 9.9S w/ the Shimano Deore XT derailleur left me unimpressed. How could a shifting mechanism so violent as to produce a loud "klunk" be reliable in the long term?

You definitely was riding the wrong Deore XT. Maybe the springs inside the mechanism were the wrong ones ?
Are you new to biking ? Deore Xt is a very reliable and higher end groupset from Shimano.

On mine it’s been butterfly smooth and crisp shifts since day 1 ! I’m sure it’s the same for all other Deore XT equipped bikes or ebikes.

When a new ebike model comes out it usually has some issues , over many months Trek should sort it out or recall all the Allant ebikes.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have heard of other Trek stores switching out for the M99 at no coast on Allants. You should see if they will bite at your LBS
 

McCorby

Member
You definitely was riding the wrong Deore XT. Maybe the springs inside the mechanism were the wrong ones ?
Are you new to biking ? Deore Xt is a very reliable and higher end groupset from Shimano.

On mine it’s been butterfly smooth and crisp shifts since day 1 ! I’m sure it’s the same for all other Deore XT equipped bikes or ebikes.

When a new ebike model comes out it usually has some issues , over many months Trek should sort it out or recall all the Allant ebikes.
I can second this. While my bike isn't a Trek, it also has an XT derailuer and it shifts up and down flawlessly....and quietly through all the gears.

Nicolas, were you possibly shifting while pedaling under heavy load? Even though Bosch has their shift sensing technology, I have found you can still mash gears while shifting under extremely heavy loads. I feel it's always a good practice to reduce your pedal force when changing gears, even with Bosch systems. Just a thought. YMMV
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I have heard of other Trek stores switching out for the M99 at no coast on Allants. You should see if they will bite at your LBS
My shop is calling Trek on Monday to get the lowdown on a switch to the M99. My bike is at the shop now. Next time I lay eyes on it, it should have some new rims and the dual battery rail.
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
I can second this. While my bike isn't a Trek, it also has an XT derailuer and it shifts up and down flawlessly....and quietly through all the gears.

Nicolas, were you possibly shifting while pedaling under heavy load? Even though Bosch has their shift sensing technology, I have found you can still mash gears while shifting under extremely heavy loads. I feel it's always a good practice to reduce your pedal force when changing gears, even with Bosch systems. Just a thought. YMMV
I concur, I have 3 bikes with the XT 11 speed derailleur and have no shifting issues. SRAM did a study and determined that in mountain biking most chain wear is from bad shifting not dirt or wear. The worst is from shifting more than one gear at a time. There's a video showing SRAM testing this on machines on a bench.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the info. I'm glad the BH Nitro City is a wonderful bike for you. My recent test drive of a Trek Allant+ 9.9S w/ the Shimano Deore XT derailleur left me unimpressed. How could a shifting mechanism so violent as to produce a loud "klunk" be reliable in the long term?
If you get a clunk, it means that the derailleur isn’t adjusted properly. You can adjust the relative hanger height on the XT via a dedicated bolt. This tweaks the distance of the jockey wheel with respect to the cassette, and that gets rid of the clunk. You’d have exactly the same clunk on your Di2 if it weren’t correctly adjusted...
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I can second this. While my bike isn't a Trek, it also has an XT derailuer and it shifts up and down flawlessly....and quietly through all the gears.

Nicolas, were you possibly shifting while pedaling under heavy load? Even though Bosch has their shift sensing technology, I have found you can still mash gears while shifting under extremely heavy loads. I feel it's always a good practice to reduce your pedal force when changing gears, even with Bosch systems. Just a thought. YMMV
DITTO
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Congrats on the new ebike. Nice looking!!
And the fun part of getting all the accessories.

One of your comments mentioned battery range. For me, I was so surprised to see the effects of a headwind, however light the wind. The range really dropped. Maybe because I tend to hold my normal speed and of course that drains the battery faster. I’m around 135 lbs and ride in upright position. Have both Bosch and Brose systems.

Many miles & smiles!
 

GuruUno

Active Member
I was getting 45-60 miles with my SuperCommuter 8 and I'm 225 (on a good day), so I sure hope it's better (mileage)
Additionally, when I did the NYC run with the Allant 9.9S, I felt the trigger shifter was a tough "push", and harder than my SC. I'd attribute it to maybe not being setup right.
Oh boy, I sure hope the Allant is not to be a problematic bike, given that the SC was comfortable and did not have the issues referenced here (like less from the battery, hard shifting).
Worst case; if after a few days, should the disappointments be there, would a LBS accept a return for a different model or do I eat it?
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I was getting 45-60 miles with my SuperCommuter 8 and I'm 225 (on a good day), so I sure hope it's better (mileage)
Additionally, when I did the NYC run with the Allant 9.9S, I felt the trigger shifter was a tough "push", and harder than my SC. I'd attribute it to maybe not being setup right.
Oh boy, I sure hope the Allant is not to be a problematic bike, given that the SC was comfortable and did not have the issues referenced here (like less from the battery, hard shifting).
Worst case; if after a few days, should the disappointments be there, would a LBS accept a return for a different model or do I eat it?
My LBS let me exchange my purchase the next day after putting 50 km on my first choice. The 2nd bike was a $400 upgrade from the first but was the right call for me. Hopefully your LBS will be cool about it also.There is certainly no harm in asking. After all they are going to want your future business .