Over 50's Trek Allant 9.9s Chronicles

Ebike Novice

New Member
Thanks for the info. I'm glad the BH Nitro City is a wonderful bike for you. My recent test drive of a Trek Allant+ 9.9S w/ the Shimano Deore XT derailleur left me unimpressed. How could a shifting mechanism so violent as to produce a loud "klunk" be reliable in the long term?
I think the DD hub motors shift smoother because they don’t put as much pressure on the chain and derailleur. That was my impression after riding a Stromer and a Vado back to back.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I borrowed my bike from the LBS today. It is in the middle of the mods but is waiting on some additional parts related to the light swap therefore I was able to borrow it for a ride. The rims are done but it is not tubeless yet and we are discussing some alternatives here (more on that in the near future). I did almost 20 miles on the new rims. Also the dual-battery rail was installed but I chose to ride without the second battery to better gauge the impact of the change in rims. I rode mostly Eco and really pushed hard for part of the ride - standing and sprinting several times. The bike felt more agile and faster accelerating (or maybe it was my imagination). I found it quite comfortable over 20 miles (stop for lunch in the middle - Peruvian - yum) and I don't think I'm going to miss the suspension fork. I can see this being a commuter that I can choose to ride as a fitness bike (I was maintaining 20-23 mph in Eco) or as an efficient transport bike (Tour - it flies and accelerates fast).

A few notes on the dual battery mount:
  • I have the medium frame and with the rail, the water bottle needs to be mounted under the top tube due to lack of space - there are bosses under the top tube and on the seat tube. There is still plenty of room on the seat tube to mount a lock
  • You'll see in the pics that the rail is permanent even if not riding with the battery. So it will ugly up the bike just having that rail attached. I'm not sure how much it weighs. Trek needs to design a bag to mount on the rail when the battery isn't needed. I tried my R&M faux-battery/bag and it doesn't fit
  • There isn't a separate locking mechanism for the 2nd battery. It locks via the Powertube lock. To remove the 2nd battery, you have to unlock and remove or just pop out the Powertube
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
That is just an awesome looking bike! I test rode its predecessor which was a really nice bike too. It looks like it is definitely the new, improved version.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
A few notes on the dual battery mount:
  • I have the medium frame and with the rail, the water bottle needs to be mounted under the top tube due to lack of space - there are bosses under the top tube and on the seat tube. There is still plenty of room on the seat tube to mount a lock
  • You'll see in the pics that the rail is permanent even if not riding with the battery. So it will ugly up the bike just having that rail attached. I'm not sure how much it weighs. Trek needs to design a bag to mount on the rail when the battery isn't needed. I tried my R&M faux-battery/bag and it doesn't fit
  • There isn't a separate locking mechanism for the 2nd battery. It locks via the Powertube lock. To remove the 2nd battery, you have to unlock and remove or just pop out the Powertube
Thanks for posting pics of the additional rail/battery. I’m really interested to know if you find a solution for a cover. For my next bike I absolutely need the option of having at least 1000Whs locked on the bike. However, I won’t need the second battery all the time. Therefore esthetics and whether protection play an important role.

So far I have identified five Bosch powered class 3 candidates with dual battery setups:

- Trek Allant series w/ dual battery
- Haibike Sduro S9.0 with the multi-rail system.
- R&M Supercharger
- Flyer GoRoc 3 w/ 45Km/h optimization and dual battery
- Scott e-ride 10

So far the R&M is the bike I find to be the most appealing as it addresses the weather/aesthetic problem. All the others leave the cradle exposed, except for the Scott which has the second battery tucked under the porter. I think manufacturers should realise that people won't be using the second battery all the time and provide some sort of cache/protection.
 
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MinnesotaMiles

New Member
Thanks for posting pics of the additional rail/battery. I’m really interested to know if you find a solution for a cover. For my next bike I absolutely need the option of having at least 1000Whs locked on the bike. However, I won’t need the second battery all the time. Therefore esthetics and whether protection play an important role.

So far I have identified five Bosch powered class 3 candidates with dual battery setups:

- Trek Allant series w/ dual battery
- Haibike Sduro S9.0 with the multi-rail system.
- R&M Supercharger
- Flyer GoRoc 3 w/ 45Km/h optimization and dual battery
- Scott e-ride 10

So far the R&M is the bike I find to be the most appealing as it addresses the weather/aesthetic problem. All the others leave the cradle exposed, except for the Scott which has the second battery tucked under the porter. I think manufacturers should realise that people won't be using the second battery all the time and provide some sort of cache/protection.
re: R&M Supercharger

I got a chance to ride the SuperCharger2. It was very nice, except that it weighed just under 70lbs. I particularly liked that fact that it drew from both batteries, 5% at a time, which prolongs battery life.
 

Rob NJ

Member
I was getting 45-60 miles with my SuperCommuter 8 and I'm 225 (on a good day), so I sure hope it's better (mileage)
Additionally, when I did the NYC run with the Allant 9.9S, I felt the trigger shifter was a tough "push", and harder than my SC. I'd attribute it to maybe not being setup right.
Oh boy, I sure hope the Allant is not to be a problematic bike, given that the SC was comfortable and did not have the issues referenced here (like less from the battery, hard shifting).
Worst case; if after a few days, should the disappointments be there, would a LBS accept a return for a different model or do I eat it?
Just brought my Allant 9.9 back from the bike shop a few minutes ago. I discussed with the bike tech the hard shifting, and in the shop it definitely felt stiffer. His view was that it was the length of the cable and the twists through the frame. When I got home, I put my wife's Supercommuter right next to the Allant, and it is WAAAY stiffer. Hopefully it will lighten up.

Weather is cold and icy in NJ today, so only rode it a little bit. No clunking, smooth power, I believe the Allant is quieter than the SC, but again can try my wife's SC when it is warmer for direct comparison.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
I spent 20+ minutes on the phone yesterday with Shimano support.
They say if you were to disconnect the shift cable at the derailleur, that the effort to "push" the trigger shifter should be "minimal" to operate, and only slightly more when connected. The test is to compare the 2; cable disconnected, connected. The LBS/Trek + ?? should make appropriate adjustments. BUT, as we know the new design with concealed cables leave much to be said about the design, engineering, etc.
I am looking to have an appointment with a ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON or HAND SURGEON.
Bottom line is: Trek, be alert, aware, let's address & fix the issue, PLEASE
 

Rob NJ

Member
I spent 20+ minutes on the phone yesterday with Shimano support.
They say if you were to disconnect the shift cable at the derailleur, that the effort to "push" the trigger shifter should be "minimal" to operate, and only slightly more when connected. The test is to compare the 2; cable disconnected, connected. The LBS/Trek + ?? should make appropriate adjustments. BUT, as we know the new design with concealed cables leave much to be said about the design, engineering, etc.
I am looking to have an appointment with a ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON or HAND SURGEON.
Bottom line is: Trek, be alert, aware, let's address & fix the issue, PLEASE
Good. I have to go back to the bike shop later this week to have different pedals put on the bike. The tech said he would do some research, and I am sure he would be happy to try disconnecting the cable. Will let you know. I have arthritis starting in my right thumb, so it is important for me as well. I also am friends with the sales manager for Trek in NY/NJ. Let me see how things go with the cable, and if the effort is high, then he is a person I can reach out to in Trek.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
You mean Jon? Great guy, he's the NJ/NY rep. Met him this year. Let's see what his take is on it all.
Me too re: arthritis.
I just got my Shimano PD-M8140 pedals, love 'em
 

Rob NJ

Member
You mean Jon? Great guy, he's the NJ/NY rep. Met him this year. Let's see what his take is on it all.
Me too re: arthritis.
I just got my Shimano PD-M8140 pedals, love 'em
Yup, Jon. We took our SuperCommuters up to Cape Cod last summer and rented his mom's place for 5 days. Total fun. Not sure what the LBS ordered for pedals, will check.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Here is the setup w 2nd battery and the lock installed. Abus Bordo Plus keyed alike. 21 miles of messing about doing errands today. 44F. Unbelievable weather.

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GuruUno

Active Member
Over50, did you put the Baramind handle bars on? I started to do mine today, and saw that the OEM grips are the BontragerSatellite Plus IsoZone Handlebar w/Satellite inForm Grips which means they are next to impossible to remove without damage, making it a necessity to get new Ergon grips (or ?) which I don't mind doing), but I wanted some feedback before I make the change. Bottom line is was it worth it? (if you did it)
I had the RedShift ShockStop Stem on my previous SuperCommuter and anything is welcome to absorb shock since it's a no go for the Allant,
BTW, absolute KILLER finished results, your bike looks sweet, and I'm jealous!
 

Rob NJ

Member
Got my Allant 9.9S The other day. It had been delayed three weeks at the LBS because the hub had been cross threaded and they had to get a new brake rotor directly from Shimano. Trek did not have any in stock. Been too cold for a ride, just up and down the driveway. No modifications yet. Did you guys notice this tag? Thought that was interesting.

1577017720224.jpeg
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Over50, did you put the Baramind handle bars on? I started to do mine today, and saw that the OEM grips are the BontragerSatellite Plus IsoZone Handlebar w/Satellite inForm Grips which means they are next to impossible to remove without damage, making it a necessity to get new Ergon grips (or ?) which I don't mind doing), but I wanted some feedback before I make the change. Bottom line is was it worth it? (if you did it)
I had the RedShift ShockStop Stem on my previous SuperCommuter and anything is welcome to absorb shock since it's a no go for the Allant,
BTW, absolute KILLER finished results, your bike looks sweet, and I'm jealous!
Thanks. Yes, the Baramind bars are on. Come to think of it, I think the shop told me they switched the grips to another Isozone variant. They look exactly the same. I can ask them which ones they used but they are really comfy. Again, they look exactly the same as the stock grips so not sure if it is a case where Bontrager has a couple of size variants in the same grip. Yes, I have the Redshift stem on my non-electric and it is nice. Wish that was an option here but so far I'm finding the Baramind + grips + carbon rims pretty comfy. I wish the Baramind had a bit more rise to it.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Any more on this? I miss my M99
Yes, the shop is just waiting on some parts/wires that they said are on backorder. I know they've had some discussions with Trek on the light switch and they seem pretty confident about being able to pull it off but are just lacking some parts.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Perhaps this is a good point for a carbon rim update. The original plan was to go with carbon rims and a tubeless setup. The goal was to achieve a nice blend of ride comfort, efficiency and safety (I figured flats on tubeless would be less frequent and faster to repair on the road). I rode the bike with the new carbon rims and with tubes and it was pretty sweet and within an acceptable level of comfort for commuting. The next step of going tubeless however didn't really go so well. My shop wasn't able to get a good seal with the stock Bontrager tires. We discussed perhaps changing to Super Moto-X and, alternatively, we discussed a plan that the shop wanted to try/recommend which was to go with Tannus Tire Armours. I noticed the Super Moto-X is a bit heavier vs the Bontragers so the latter is a lighter tire vs what I am used to riding on my other commuters. I was pretty hesitant about the Tannus, however, because I thought they would negate the gains of the carbon rims and make the bike more sluggish. I checked out the reviews and they seemed pretty good. The few comments I found on the forum seem positive. I weighed the safety gains against the efficiency loss. The Tannus is a ride-flat product: it would make flats much less likely but in the event of one, I could still ride the bike under 10 mph and protect the rims. A flat at 6am in a dark section of the city on my commute has not been something I've been looking forward to. I decided to give it a go weighing some promise of better ride comfort and increased safety against a heavier setup. The shop has done the back wheel and I took the bike on a 20+ mile ride yesterday. They are waiting on the liner for the front wheel. I'm not sure if I could tell a difference in the ride with the back tire complete. I was riding heavier overall relative to the last ride because I went dual battery and carried the new lock which weighs about 3 pounds. The bike was still acceptable in terms of comfort. Perhaps I noticed it less zippy but I'm not sure about that. Again, it was hard to notice a difference. By the end of this week, the front tire setup should be done afterwhich we will only lack the M99 swap.
 

Luv2ride

Member
Perhaps this is a good point for a carbon rim update. The original plan was to go with carbon rims and a tubeless setup. The goal was to achieve a nice blend of ride comfort, efficiency and safety (I figured flats on tubeless would be less frequent and faster to repair on the road). I rode the bike with the new carbon rims and with tubes and it was pretty sweet and within an acceptable level of comfort for commuting. The next step of going tubeless however didn't really go so well. My shop wasn't able to get a good seal with the stock Bontrager tires. We discussed perhaps changing to Super Moto-X and, alternatively, we discussed a plan that the shop wanted to try/recommend which was to go with Tannus Tire Armours. I noticed the Super Moto-X is a bit heavier vs the Bontragers so the latter is a lighter tire vs what I am used to riding on my other commuters. I was pretty hesitant about the Tannus, however, because I thought they would negate the gains of the carbon rims and make the bike more sluggish. I checked out the reviews and they seemed pretty good. The few comments I found on the forum seem positive. I weighed the safety gains against the efficiency loss. The Tannus is a ride-flat product: it would make flats much less likely but in the event of one, I could still ride the bike under 10 mph and protect the rims. A flat at 6am in a dark section of the city on my commute has not been something I've been looking forward to. I decided to give it a go weighing some promise of better ride comfort and increased safety against a heavier setup. The shop has done the back wheel and I took the bike on a 20+ mile ride yesterday. They are waiting on the liner for the front wheel. I'm not sure if I could tell a difference in the ride with the back tire complete. I was riding heavier overall relative to the last ride because I went dual battery and carried the new lock which weighs about 3 pounds. The bike was still acceptable in terms of comfort. Perhaps I noticed it less zippy but I'm not sure about that. Again, it was hard to notice a difference. By the end of this week, the front tire setup should be done afterwhich we will only lack the M99 swap.
I have been riding with Tannus and a slime filled tube in the rear tire for the last few thousand miles. I have had two incidents of flats, the first one was an inch long nail that flattened the tire but I was able to re-inflate it and the slime sealed the hole allowing me to get to my LBS and let them change it for me. The second one just this week was an inch long piece of metal and unfortunately the slime would not seal the hole. I called a friend for a ride and the shop (who encouraged me to use Tannus) with no expectation from me changed it for free. I have not yet put it on the front as I almost never get front flats and it is easier to repair on the road then the rear.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
Yes, the shop is just waiting on some parts/wires that they said are on backorder. I know they've had some discussions with Trek on the light switch and they seem pretty confident about being able to pull it off but are just lacking some parts.
An even swap out or at an expense to you?
If n even swap out, how it get approved/validated?