Owner experiences - Road ebikes - 40 lbs or less

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I just got my Specialized Creo E5 and will be taking it for the maiden voyage tomorrow. I'm looking forward to it, but also want to hear from owner's of similar bikes and their experiences, likes/dislikes of their bikes. This might be my first road ebike, but it's unlikely to be the last.

I'll post my first impressions after my ride, and hoping other owner's will post their impressions of similar bikes. I considered a number of other similar bikes like the Synapse Neo, wanted to consider the Orbea Gain but was not available locally. I liked the BMC Alpenchallenge Road series but the Two wasn't available and the One was too expensive.
 

Sean McIllwain

New Member
In 6 months, I put over 3500 miles on my Pinarello Dyodo. Recently sold it to make room for a Creo Expert that I have on order. The Dyodo is a fantastic bike and honestly, the ride quality between it and the Creo is very, very comparable.

I am only upgrading as the Creo addresses all of my minor complaints.

1. Mid-drive - Changing a rear flat on the Dyodo is no fun. Additionally, the mid-drive system centers the weight better (noticeable on descents), and the wider Q factor is negligible (for me).

2. Class 3 - 95% of the time, I had no problem with the Dyodo being a Class 1; however, I would occasionally get dropped on fast sections of the weekly group ride. With the Creo's ability to assist up to 28mph, I should be able to always stay with the pack or at least be able to have an easier time bridging any gaps.

3. Bigger battery / Better Range Extender - The Dyodo's Range Extender allowed me to easily explore the mountains with no anxiety, but it used a special cage that was designed specifically for the Extender. When I wasn’t using the Extender, I couldn’t carry an extra water bottle because of the odd shape of the cage. The Creo Range Extender fits into a standard water bottle cage.

4. 1x drivetrain - This is a personal preference, but I find a 2x drivetrain unnecessary on an e-bike.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Sean thanks for the impressions, appreciate them.

I took my Creo out for the maiden voyage today and it was interesting to say the least. I thought I'd be smart and put it into HR mode so that the motor would only kick in when my HR hit 140 bpm. So off I go and it doesn't seem like the motor is helping but it's probably because my HR isn't up to 140 bpm so no big deal. I ride up some short inclines and again the motor doesn't appear to come on.

So I finally get to a short but very steep hill. I start up the hill and I'm working like crazy. I think the motor comes on but I'm thinking geez it's not helping much. I'm halfway up this hill and now I feel searing pain and I'm thinking holy cow I'm in that bad of shape. I've ridden this hill on my Cervelo and done much better, but it is early in the year and I haven't been riding a lot so a bit understandable.

So after about 6 km's I arrive at my friends place and take my phone out of my pocket to check the stats and it says I have 99% battery left. Hmmm, I guess I didn't use much of the motor. Then I notice my HR says zero and then it dawns on me that I forgot to put my HRM on and the Creo doesn't seem to pick up the HR of my Garmin watch when I put it in broadcast mode.

No wonder I found it so hard to ride up the hill, it's normally hard and I wasn't using the motor but I had the extra weight. But how come I had 99% battery, where did that 1% of battery get used?

Anyhow after this I put it in standard mode and I set it to Eco to get some minimal assistance.

Stats from the ride
  • 44.21 km's, elevation gained 26 meters, 733 calories burned, 96 wh used, average support level 43.44%
I used Eco for the majority of the ride but when I got to within 5 km's of home I put it into turbo.

When I first rode the bike I felt it did not have the response and handling of my Cervelo. But after the ride I have to say that I'm not sure it rides that differently from my Cervelo. I was planning on keeping the Cervelo, but now I think I might sell it. The bike rides closely enough to the Cervelo that I don't think it makes sense to keep the Cervelo.

I really enjoyed the bike and I was skeptical of the range claims of the bike. But I used a bit less than 1/3 of the battery to ride 44 km's. So perhaps 130 km's on the internal battery is possible. Then again I had the system off for the first part of the ride, so who knows. I used 96 watt hours in 44 km's, so less than 2.5 watt hours per km, which I find amazing.

This bike resolves a lot of the issues I had with my Juiced CCS. It's so much lighter and feels like a real bike, it offers a more aerodynamic position which really helps the efficiency. Best of all it's far more efficient and the range appears to be fine. I'll need to go on my rides, but it looks good at the moment.

An enjoyable first ride and looking forward to logging many more miles. I have a friend who races Cat 3 and I haven't gone riding with him for a while as I can't keep up. This new bike means I'll be able to go on longer rides with him.
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
In 6 months, I put over 3500 miles on my Pinarello Dyodo. Recently sold it to make room for a Creo Expert that I have on order. The Dyodo is a fantastic bike and honestly, the ride quality between it and the Creo is very, very comparable.

I am only upgrading as the Creo addresses all of my minor complaints.

1. Mid-drive - Changing a rear flat on the Dyodo is no fun. Additionally, the mid-drive system centers the weight better (noticeable on descents), and the wider Q factor is negligible (for me).

2. Class 3 - 95% of the time, I had no problem with the Dyodo being a Class 1; however, I would occasionally get dropped on fast sections of the weekly group ride. With the Creo's ability to assist up to 28mph, I should be able to always stay with the pack or at least be able to have an easier time bridging any gaps.

3. Bigger battery / Better Range Extender - The Dyodo's Range Extender allowed me to easily explore the mountains with no anxiety, but it used a special cage that was designed specifically for the Extender. When I wasn’t using the Extender, I couldn’t carry an extra water bottle because of the odd shape of the cage. The Creo Range Extender fits into a standard water bottle cage.

4. 1x drivetrain - This is a personal preference, but I find a 2x drivetrain unnecessary on an e-bike.
everyone is selling their ebikemotion or fazua vastly inferior ebikes. Lucky if you get 1.500 or higher ..

Weren't those some clever scams !! 250wh battery, 40lb ebike...
Yea , but you can remove the battery and ride it lol 😉

The reference ebike is TREK Domane +HP.

Waiting for some honest reviews about Creo's 320wh battery range.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I really enjoyed the bike and I was skeptical of the range claims of the bike. But I used a bit less than 1/3 of the battery to ride 44 km's. So perhaps 130 km's on the internal battery is possible
so, 1/3 of bat. (used in Eco 70% and 30% turbo )(5km) for a total of 39km ? (44-the 6 in the beginning).

How fast were you able to go in Eco mode on flats ?How did you like the Turbo ? It feels stable at 26-28mph ?

Being that it is early season, there is plenty of room for fitness improvement🚴🏻‍♂️ .

oh and 1 other q- What is your BW ?bodyweight. that can give a better idea of a possible range.

Thank you
 
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Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
everyone is selling their ebikemotion or fazua vastly inferior ebikes. Lucky if you get 1.500 or higher ..

Weren't those some clever scams !! 250wh battery, 40lb ebike...
Yea , but you can remove the battery and ride it lol 😉

The reference ebike is TREK Domane +HP.
Trek's top-of-the-line (or at least most expensive road e-bike) is the Domane+ LT 9, which still uses the Fazua drive. Not having ridden one, I can't say if I would be completely turned off by its 20mph cut-off, or whether its 6lb. weight advantage would offset that. I suppose Fazua is for someone who wants as close to a pure analog bike but does not mind having assistance when the road points upwards.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
so, 1/3 of bat. (used in Eco 70% and 30% turbo )(5km) for a total of 39km ? (44-the 6 in the beginning).

How fast were you able to go in Eco mode on flats ?How did you like the Turbo ? It feels stable at 26-28mph ?

Being that it is early season, there is plenty of room for fitness improvement🚴🏻‍♂️ .

oh and 1 other q- What is your BW ?bodyweight. that can give a better idea of a possible range.

Thank you
I do know that I for all intents and purposes wasn't using the motor for the first 6 km's. I honestly was really questioning myself and almost stopped on the hill to walk. But I thought to myself what kind of rider am I if I can't even get up this hill with the help of the motor. I felt both relieved and stupid when I realized I was riding without motor assistance.

As for the amount of time using turbo mode I'd estimate that to be almost exactly 5 km's as I was riding my regular commute route home so it would have been 11% of the route in turbo mode, Roughly 72% in Eco with a very tiny bit in sport mode and 13% with no motor. Definitely favourable conditions for conserving battery.

I weigh roughly 170 lbs with my winter cycling gear on as it's still pretty cold here. I live in Canada, one of the warmest parts of Canada but it's still pretty cold here just the same.

Today I rode to work and decided to ride Sport the entire way. I had probably 20-25 lbs. of backpack, laptop, clothes and a heavy Kryptonite chain while riding. I used 86 watt hours to travel 18.5 km's so more than twice the battery drain of the previous day. Used just under 4.8 watt hours per km.

Not sure how fast I was going as with all the winter gear on my jacket covers my watch. We weren't going that fast though. Just riding fairly casually and chatting. If I had to guess we were probably cruising at 25 - 30 km/hr.

I don't think I ever hit 28 mph in turbo mode because I wasn't riding that hard and in Canada the limiter hits at 20 mph.

I am discovering the bike and I'm sure the data is going to be all over the map depending on route, who I'm riding with, etc ..... my riding partner yesterday is what I'd consider an intermediate level cyclist. In 2019 he rode 2,000 km's and that was his highest year ever.

The real test and that one that gives me range anxiety is when I go with my racing buddies who like to hammer. I run the risk of getting dropped since these guys will ride local Gran Fondo's at an average of around 40 km/hr. so above my speed limit and I'll have to follow wheels closely or I am going to get dropped fast! Even if I didn't have a speed limiter, I can imagine going that fast is going to drain the battery pretty quick.

Riding to work today with the weight I was carrying I was thinking that geez even with all this weight with the bike in Sport mode I can go pretty fast. I can imagine the Domane +HP would be an absolute rocket, and maybe I should never get that bike to avoid the risk that I crash at really high speed :)

Update: Rode home today and thought I'd try out the HR mode. Put my HRM on turned it on and set the mode on my phone and off we go, or did we? I can feel that the HRM came a bit loose when I put my jersey on over it, but hey it's still on my arm connected right? I'm not positive but I've got two jerseys and two jackets on. I'm not taking it all off to ensure my HRM is connected properly. I look at my watch and it shows a HR, but is that from the wrist sensor or the strap? I ride home and I'm not going as fast as I would expect. I have over 200 metres of elevation gain and one hill that is the majority of it. I'm thinking geez if I didn't know any better it's easier to ride up this hill on my Cervelo. I'm redlining like crazy and suspect I'm getting little to no assistance from the motor.

I get home and see, yep my HRM was loose and not sending a signal to the Mission Control app, so once again it thought my HR was below the threshold and the motor didn't turn on. I check the app and it says I used a grand total of 1 wh to ride the almost 18 km's home and with about 210 metres of elevation gain. Once again I made the ride and climb harder than if I had just ridden my Cervelo because at least that bike is about 12-14 lbs. lighter!

I'll get the HRM mode right one of these days.
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Trek's top-of-the-line (or at least most expensive road e-bike) is the Domane+ LT 9, which still uses the Fazua drive. Not having ridden one, I can't say if I would be completely turned off by its 20mph cut-off, or whether its 6lb. weight advantage would offset that. I suppose Fazua is for someone who wants as close to a pure analog bike but does not mind having assistance when the road points upwards.
That's no longer true. It was indeed and still is a 7.000$ ebike but nobody in their right mind will buy it , since 2weeks ago with the new one (the Domane +HP) being revealed.

They were reading my posts 😉 and decided to beat Specialized and made this one:

Note- it can have a 500wh X 2 battery set up, 37-42lb weight only. Amazing i say.


It was launched about 2 weeks ago.


Joke aside, it was a ? on what type of road ebikes to make , and i think that is becoming very clear:
Young Or Not so young, we want good or very good range and speed for our ebikes. And make them light under 40lb.

Is CREO & DOMANE +HP Right now. Maynbe also BMC AMP ONE,
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
eigh roughly 170 lbs with my winter cycling gear on as it's still pretty cold here. I live in Canada, one of the warmest parts of Canada but it's still pretty co

Very nice read, thank you i for a well written piece.

You sound like you have the right weight, i'm sure in a few weeks you will get some speed in the legs. Endurance or junk miles is the key, then some threadshold rides and you can hang on with the cat. 3's . I was one of them, we have a local ride in Ny/Nj is called Rocket Ride( 25mph average in the summer, 21-22 in the winter and a shorter route). I had put my carbon Storck Scenario on the wall since i've got my 30mph Ebike. I don't miss the overtraining and sore legs.

I think that b/c the +HP has a bigger battery , more amps (11.6 vs 8.6 ?) it will perform better.
But Creo is a few lbs lighter and it seems that it has a better motor ? Bosch i read that it has too many warranty issues... Only by riding both of them can know.

You got a very good range for ~ 220lb weight, 260lb with the ebike ! 86wh for 11miles even if it wasn't that fast (17-18mph ?) . Almost 30% of the battery for 220-230lb w/o including ebike weight. I think is very good.

That means that in eco / sport it would eat about 40-50% for a 20mph avg. speed with that weight. For 165-170lb probably 20-25% only.
It sounds like it can do 40-50miles but if hammering at 28mph i would just use the draft of the peloton😉 and conserve the battery.

Hopefully they won't ask you to pull too long just b/c you have an xtra engine.
 

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
That's no longer true. It was indeed and still is a 7.000$ ebike but nobody in their right mind will buy it , since 2weeks ago with the new one (the Domane +HP) being revealed.
I am looking at what Trek is offering for 2020 (in the USA). The Domane+ LT 9 with Fazua and Dura Ace Di2 is listed at $12,499.99, and the Domane+ HP 7 with Bosch and Ultegra Di2 is listed at $9699.99. I have no clue as to how many Trek will sell, or which model will sell better. It is interesting to note that the HP 7 comes with lights and a kickstand, which indicates it is marketed to a different rider than the person who would buy the LT 9.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Given how many variables can affect battery consumption I want to acquire a lot more data before coming to any conclusions. Temperature might affect efficiency, I'm not sure about that but it might. Certainly riding home today with the HRM slipping off means the data point is useless as I rode 17.X km's using a grand total of 1 watt hour.

Fortunately the app keeps all the history, so I'll report back in April or May.

I don't think I had 220 lbs with my backpack though. Say I'm 170 lbs. with shoes, and all my gear, say 25 lbs. for backpack and everything inside, that's only 195 lbs. bike is say 30 lbs. so 225 lbs. including the bike. Oh and my speed was pretty slow. I'm always a lot slower in winter than spring/summer or fall. All that gear seems to affect my pedaling efficiency and it was really cold today. Go faster and the wind chill is worse. I'd estimate I was doing about 13 mph, maybe 14 mph.

I like the Creo, but in say 2 years time if they changed the law here and I could buy a Domane+HP, I'd be there! I'd use both bikes in different circumstances.
 
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King me

New Member
Saying howdy to Captain Slow and thanks for the invite to this thread. I've recently purchased a Cannondale Synapse Neo SE. At 40 pounds, it just does qualify as a participant in this topic ha ha.
In coming to my buying decision, I considered these parameters: comfort, range, quality, and performance. I knew I'd be riding with my local group around 3X/week. This would be a mix of my ebike and existing (accoustic? what does that mean?) road bike. I also knew I and my wife would be riding casually/socially with a group of friends who have already purchased ebikes as well. So, range was near the top of my priorities. I also recently retired and this purchase was my gift to myself, therefore quality wanted. Performance was mainly defined by torque sensing mid-drive systems, leaving hub and Fazua drives out for me.

The Neo SE has very good range: 90ish miles on a charge (in Eco) due to its 500wh battery pack and relatively light weight. I knew I could easily stretch that range by riding non-assisted for parts of a given ride. The quality of the SE is unquestionable: Sram 1X11 Apex1 derailleur/shifters, FSA cranks & chainring, tubeless ready tires & rims, carbon fork & seatpost, etc. So far I've been impressed and pleased with the performance of the Bosch Active Line Plus motor system. But since purchasing the bike, I have done some minor second-guessing about getting a Class 1 (20mph) vs. Class 3 (28mph) system. Yet as I ride with it, I content myself with the awareness that anytime I'm riding faster than 20mph, I'm in a situation (e.g. descent, tailwind) where I can maintain that speed unassisted anyway. Lastly, the riding comfort of this bike was a real surprise for me. I've regularly read about the greater stability of ebikes due to their greater weight. Confirmed. The SE has a 2" longer wheelbase than my road bike. This makes it track straighter but turn slower, that is, some understeer. For the kind of non-technical and more casual rides I'll be doing, this is a big plus. The spec'd 650b wheels are mounted with 47mm tires. They reduce road chatter A LOT. Ruts, potholes, bumps are all smaller & softer. People who ride cruisers already know this - I had forgotten from my youth! Yet the SE still rolls out like a road bike.


I feel like I hit the intersection of my goals. Now to get one for my wife and get her riding! Cheers for now.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I am looking at what Trek is offering for 2020 (in the USA). The Domane+ LT 9 with Fazua and Dura Ace Di2 is listed at $12,499.99, and the Domane+ HP 7 with Bosch and Ultegra Di2 is listed at $9699.99. I have no clue as to how many Trek will sell, or which model will sell better. It is interesting to note that the HP 7 comes with lights and a kickstand, which indicates it is marketed to a different rider than the person who would buy the LT 9.

Is pretty much for the same rider , just one ebike is A LOT slower and SHORT RANGE.
-and the +HP w/o DI2 is 7.000$. No need for DI2 for some.
Another grand and it has a 2nd 500wh pack.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
There is the electric guitar and there is the acoustic guitar.
There is the electric bike, so there is the acoustic...
🤣
Makes sense until you look up the definition of the word "acoustic".

Captain Slow, I'm interested in your Creo's comfort level, since it has an aluminum frame. If I were to buy a Creo the E5 would be the model I'd purchase. The $6000 (Can) price tag looks to be very fair, considering I paid $5500 for my 2018 Giant Defy Advanced Pro 0. The carbon version probably has a better ride, but it's also $2000 more.

The only thing holding me back is I want to get another year out of my Defy, because I probably won't ride much after I purchase something like the Creo.

King Me, I also like the Neo SE and the price also looks to be decent. Too bad Cannondale didn't go with the Gen 4 Bosch motor for 2020.