Pedal Assist vs Throttle Battery Question

ebikelike

New Member
Region
USA
Hey All, new Trail Tracker owner here. Had a question regarding Pedal Assist vs Throttle in regards to the battery:

what would use more battery or is it equal

[1] using pedal assist at say 4 and pedaling vs
[2] using the full throttle and pedaling?

thanks
 

HCooke

New Member
Region
USA
I have a Platinum Interceptor. Look at the display that shows how much battery is being used. My experience is that full throttle will use up your battery faster than level 4 assist.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Hey All, new Trail Tracker owner here. Had a question regarding Pedal Assist vs Throttle in regards to the battery:

what would use more battery or is it equal

[1] using pedal assist at say 4 and pedaling vs
[2] using the full throttle and pedaling?

thanks
With this bike it will not matter. PAS uses the same source of power as the throttle while pedaling the same amount and going the same speed.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
The answer to your question really depends on the type of riding you do. For frequent stops & starts and riding at constantly changing speeds, you are probably better off using the PAS. If you ride at a relatively constant speed without many stops, you can gain efficiency by setting the throttle to that speed and pedaling to assist the throttle. That way, you minimize current spikes which occur when you stop pedaling and then start again.

I have a Platinum Interceptor and tests have shown I gain 14% more miles per charge using this process. I use a mechanical cruise control device which I set at the speed I want. I then apply a comfortable amount of pedal pressure so that I'm assisting the bike rather than it assisting me.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The answer to your question really depends on the type of riding you do. For frequent stops & starts and riding at constantly changing speeds, you are probably better off using the PAS. If you ride at a relatively constant speed without many stops, you can gain efficiency by setting the throttle to that speed and pedaling to assist the throttle. That way, you minimize current spikes which occur when you stop pedaling and then start again.

I have a Platinum Interceptor and tests have shown I gain 14% more miles per charge using this process. I use a mechanical cruise control device which I set at the speed I want. I then apply a comfortable amount of pedal pressure so that I'm assisting the bike rather than it assisting me.
You are correct about spikes. In the Wind and Climbs thread I will talk about easing them on mid-drive torque sensor bikes for improving range by reducing power drain. Your 14% data sounds about right. Interesting stuff. Thanks.
Today's group ride was cut short when a rider's new pedal seized and stripped the crank arm because he didn't just stop pedaling when it froze.