Pedego Stretch Back Wheel

Perfectagain

New Member
I own and love a Pedego Stretch, about three years old. For the second or third time, I had a flat on the back wheel which required that I remove it. Each time the removal and re-installation has been extremely difficult because the dropouts for the wheel are, in my judgement, too narrow. I have to use a lever like a screwdriver to slightly open the frame and then use a block of wood to, as gently as possible, hammer the axle into the dropout. The first time, I called technical support and asked. They were prompt, but said more or less, "that's the way it is, live with it." I am a very experienced cyclist and have removed innumerable rear wheels from conventional bikes - derailleurs, three speeds, etc. Generally I know how to do it. I also have a Pedego City Commuter. There is no problem removing and re-installing its rear wheel. Has anyone had the same experience with their Stretch? Is there any "trick" am missing?
 

Paul Auclair

New Member
Hi @Perfectagain

Are you removing the lock washers when you are taking the rear wheel out, or are you leaving them in the dropout during this process?

I know leaving them in while you pull the wheel out can contribute to making this process more difficult.
 

Perfectagain

New Member
By the lock washers, I assume you mean the washers with a right angle tab which fits into the dropout on each side to prevent the axle from rotating. I pull those out when removing the wheel and keep them out until the wheel is returned and seated in the dropouts. Still too tight! Thanks for the response. Any other thoughts?
 

Paul Auclair

New Member
I know this is not the most luxurious resolution, but taking a file and removing some of the paint in the dropout (if there is any) may also help resolve this issue.
 

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, even though the Pedego rep was not helpful, you may indeed have to "live with it." Being an aluminum frame which has significant reinforcement due to the built-in rack and stretched rear triangle, there would be no way to widen the dropouts. Perhaps as Paul suggests, you might file away some paint, or maybe replace one of the locknuts on the hub with a thinner one?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
This is my speculation, but I noticed that there are very close application to rear dropout width.

In Bafang's case, the most common dropout widths are:
138mm and 135mm.

These two are very close in length, so you can just force it into the frame.
However, that 3mm will make a difference, you will need to use some muscle and leverage to force it in.

Dapu makes a pretty weird dropout widths too.

135mm (okay this is standard)
139mm (very close to 138mm)
142mm (close to 138mm, but could cause problem)

Perhaps, the Pedego's dropout widths is standard 138mm.
But the motor could be 142mm.
 

Perfectagain

New Member
Thank you all for the responses. I did get a response from the Pedego Technical Support people, basically saying that they have no answers and no suggestions. They gave one thought which I do not believe to be useful -- remove the derailleur. But that does not increase the width of the dropouts and would only leave me probably having to re-adjust the gears. That is not satisfactory and in 50 years of riding, and 18 bikes which I currently own, and all of the websites telling one how to change a tire, that has never been a suggestion. So, thanks again for your efforts and prompt response. Just to make certain I am clear that thanks to you is sincere, not sarcastic. Dave
 

Perfectagain

New Member
In fairness, I should add that after writing the above, I received another email from Pedego Technical Support suggesting two possible remedies. The first, removal of the derailleur is premised on the fact that the attachment of the derailleur interferes with the nuts on the axle so that removing the derailleur makes installation easier. The second is that when delivered, the brake side of the axle has a washer which goes on the inside of the drop out. The washer can be removed, making the assembly narrower and thus easier to insert in the dropouts. That will require re-adjustment of the brakes. Since I have just put the rear wheel back, I am not going to test either suggestion, for a long time, I hope.