Perfect bike for a short rider?

AVikingsWife

New Member
First and foremost, I'm only 5'2" with a 28-ish" inseam (if I measured correctly), so finding an e-bike in general is a challenge for my short little legs. I've been lurking and researching for a while, and I finally narrowed it down between these options (though I'm open minded to more ideas):

- Ariel Rider M-Class
- Biktrix Stunner X 24x3
- Biktrix Stunner LT Small
- DIYing my hand-me-down Specialized Hardrock 15"

MY E-BIKE NEWBIE/POSSIBLY IGNORANT WISHLIST:

Comfort:
It's gotta feel good on my bum for a long ride. More importantly, I want something that fits my 5'2" body and is easy for me to maneuver. My husband has a 4 year old Voltbike Yukon that's WAY too scary for me to feel comfortable on. I have a hand-me-down Specialized Hardrock 15" that is a great size for me. I've tried the Specialized Vado 4.0 Medium size and it was slightly big, but I could probably get used to that size if I had to.

Weather:
I live near SLC, Utah and so it goes from unbearably hot in the summer to freezing cold in the winter. I'd like to be able to use it year round.

Range:
I will want to use pedal assist for the hard stuff and to go longer, but I still want to keep a little bit of a workout. I want to replace my car for everyday errands (most are within a 5 mile radius of my home). But I would also like to go at least 35-ish miles roundtrip to/from my sister's house a couple times a month. And then a few times a year my parents (they have Specialized Vado 4.0) want to do some longer/overnight type trips on well maintained/paved paths.

Terrain:
Mostly well maintained pavement, but it's a bonus if I could venture out on a packed trail every once in a while. Although I live near a lot of good off road trails, it's probably more realistic that I'll go hiking more than mountain biking because then I don't have to deal with a rack. But what do I know? Maybe I'd love it on a trail?

Cargo:
Storage options so I can get groceries and run errands.

MY E-BIKE NEWBIE/POSSIBLY IGNORANT PROS AND CONS:

M-Class Pros
- Mid drive motor
- Relatively lightweight
- Best bang for the buck
- Will definitely fit me

M-Class Cons
- Unsure about the comfort of small wheels over a long range.
- Unsure of the performance on less than ideal roads.
- Unsure of cargo capacity
- I think it's ugly (stupid I know, but it's a consideration).
- Customer service and QC are hit and miss

Stunner X 24x3 Pros
- Mid-drive motor
- More power
- Bigger tires for a more comfortable ride
- Great customer service

Stunner X 24x3 Cons
- I've verified that the height is OK for me, but it still *might* feel too BIG
- Heaviest (especially if I add a front rack)
- Most expensive option

Stunner LT Small Pros
- It will definitely fit me
- Cheaper than the Stunner X
- Lighter
- Great customer service

Stunner LT Small Cons
- I don't love the aesthetic of smaller tires.
- Hub drive
- Less power

I'm open to DIYing, but my second hand Hardrock isn't in nice shape and would need a big ol' tuneup. And although the size of it fits me great, the riding position is not comfortable for a long ride. And I think I'd prefer a step-through.

What do y'all think? Thanks for any insight!
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
i don't know if you've done a lot of rest rides, yet...but you also have to consider if you want a bike with a basic cadence sensor or a much more natural feeling torque sensor. for someone like me who likes to pedal, it's a huge factor and i know i'll never buy a bike without a torque sensor. out of the three you listed, only the Ariel Rider M has a torque sensing middrive. i really like the bike but the mixed reviews about customer service also scare me off.

my wife is also about your height and i've been considering getting her the motobecane EF3 which is a folding bike with a shimano middrive or the raleigh talus IE step thru (which is on sale at costco right now for $1100). both of these bikes have a torque sensor but we have a lot of hills in our area so i'm leaning towards a bike with a middrive.
 

AVikingsWife

New Member
i don't know if you've done a lot of rest rides, yet...but you also have to consider if you want a bike with a basic cadence sensor or a much more natural feeling torque sensor. for someone like me who likes to pedal, it's a huge factor and i know i'll never buy a bike without a torque sensor. out of the three you listed, only the Ariel Rider M has a torque sensing middrive.

Thanks for the reply!

Due to the high influx of Covid in my area and a couple high risk family members, I'm hesitant to go do a lot of test rides in shops, but I have tried my dad's Vado 4.0 with a torque sensor and it was reallllly nice. Consensus is torque is more natural feeling when pedaling, right? I too want to pedal as much as I can (if I wanted a moped I'd get a moped, you know?), so in that case I should heavily consider the torque? It's an important enough factor to sway the vote? How does the mid drive/hub drive debate sit with you as a peddler.

Also, on the BikTrix website specs it lists the Stunner LT as torque, but EBR has it as cadence. I should dig deeper on that one...
 

E-Wheels

Well-Known Member
First and foremost, I'm only 5'2" with a 28-ish" inseam (if I measured correctly), so finding an e-bike in general is a challenge for my short little legs. I've been lurking and researching for a while, and I finally narrowed it down between these options (though I'm open minded to more ideas):

- Ariel Rider M-Class
- Biktrix Stunner X 24x3
- Biktrix Stunner LT Small
- DIYing my hand-me-down Specialized Hardrock 15"

MY E-BIKE NEWBIE/POSSIBLY IGNORANT WISHLIST:

Comfort:
It's gotta feel good on my bum for a long ride. More importantly, I want something that fits my 5'2" body and is easy for me to maneuver. My husband has a 4 year old Voltbike Yukon that's WAY too scary for me to feel comfortable on. I have a hand-me-down Specialized Hardrock 15" that is a great size for me. I've tried the Specialized Vado 4.0 Medium size and it was slightly big, but I could probably get used to that size if I had to.

Weather:
I live near SLC, Utah and so it goes from unbearably hot in the summer to freezing cold in the winter. I'd like to be able to use it year round.

Range:
I will want to use pedal assist for the hard stuff and to go longer, but I still want to keep a little bit of a workout. I want to replace my car for everyday errands (most are within a 5 mile radius of my home). But I would also like to go at least 35-ish miles roundtrip to/from my sister's house a couple times a month. And then a few times a year my parents (they have Specialized Vado 4.0) want to do some longer/overnight type trips on well maintained/paved paths.

Terrain:
Mostly well maintained pavement, but it's a bonus if I could venture out on a packed trail every once in a while. Although I live near a lot of good off road trails, it's probably more realistic that I'll go hiking more than mountain biking because then I don't have to deal with a rack. But what do I know? Maybe I'd love it on a trail?

Cargo:
Storage options so I can get groceries and run errands.

MY E-BIKE NEWBIE/POSSIBLY IGNORANT PROS AND CONS:

M-Class Pros
- Mid drive motor
- Relatively lightweight
- Best bang for the buck
- Will definitely fit me

M-Class Cons
- Unsure about the comfort of small wheels over a long range.
- Unsure of the performance on less than ideal roads.
- Unsure of cargo capacity
- I think it's ugly (stupid I know, but it's a consideration).
- Customer service and QC are hit and miss

Stunner X 24x3 Pros
- Mid-drive motor
- More power
- Bigger tires for a more comfortable ride
- Great customer service

Stunner X 24x3 Cons
- I've verified that the height is OK for me, but it still *might* feel too BIG
- Heaviest (especially if I add a front rack)
- Most expensive option

Stunner LT Small Pros
- It will definitely fit me
- Cheaper than the Stunner X
- Lighter
- Great customer service

Stunner LT Small Cons
- I don't love the aesthetic of smaller tires.
- Hub drive
- Less power

I'm open to DIYing, but my second hand Hardrock isn't in nice shape and would need a big ol' tuneup. And although the size of it fits me great, the riding position is not comfortable for a long ride. And I think I'd prefer a step-through.

What do y'all think? Thanks for any insight!
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the reply!

Due to the high influx of Covid in my area and a couple high risk family members, I'm hesitant to go do a lot of test rides in shops, but I have tried my dad's Vado 4.0 with a torque sensor and it was reallllly nice. Consensus is torque is more natural feeling when pedaling, right? I too want to pedal as much as I can (if I wanted a moped I'd get a moped, you know?), so in that case I should heavily consider the torque? It's an important enough factor to sway the vote? How does the mid drive/hub drive debate sit with you as a peddler.

Also, on the BikTrix website specs it lists the Stunner LT as torque, but EBR has it as cadence. I should dig deeper on that one...

My first eBike had a basic cadence sensor. I might have kept it if not for the cadence sensor. It felt like an/off switch when pedaling. It was not pleasant for me at all.
I live in an area with a lot of hills so the middrive really does help since it can mechanically leverage the available gearing. A hub drive will still help for sure but would struggle on the long sustained hills I have on my commute.
 

AVikingsWife

New Member
My first eBike had a basic cadence sensor. I might have kept it if not for the cadence sensor. It felt like an/off switch when pedaling. It was not pleasant for me at all.

Yeah I'm thinking the torque sensor is the right fit for me too. I double checked with the owner of Biktrix and the newest model of the Stunner LT IS a torque sensor, so I think I'm going to go with that one! Wish it were also a mid drive, but I think a hub drive with torque will suite my ability better than a mid drive with cadence.
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
Biktrix Stunner LT Small has 15.4 frame size.

It also has stand-over height 20" (the lowest point to stand OVER it) - this is pretty high as step-through frames go. Won't cause problems standing over it but can be more hassle to step through it when getting into a saddle.

You might also consider Aventon Pace 300 or 500 Step-Through, Small size 14.5". They posted 34" stand over height for step-through model but they are of course wrong. Their step-through has about 16-18" stand over. 34" is for their regular diamond frame.
 
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Marci jo

Well-Known Member
AVikingsWife,
I can so relate to your situation. Although I'm 5'6, my legs are vertically challenged and I have a tough time finding smaller frames. Added to that many manufactures use 700 cc wheels and 2" tires and the end result is a huge wheel that requires an elevator for mounting/dismounting. (lol)
Both my ebikes claim to be step through frames, but are more like mid-step. I would not recommend them as true step through ebikes.

And I'm in agreement with aesthetics. For sure, if you think the bike is ugly, don't even consider it. I personally can't stand the look of a "brick on the downtube", such as the Trek Verve, even though it's one of Trek's top sellers.

Relatively light weight? hmmm....that's a tough one. What's heavy to one person may not be to another one. I only feel the weight of my ebikes when it comes time to haul them, not while riding them.

Saw this bike recently online. It's an Evelo Galaxy. What appealed to me is the wheels are only 24 inches, and thus lower to the ground. Beyond that, I'm not familiar with it.

Please post what you find as I am starting my list of features for my next ebike, and step through/wave frame is number one criteria.

1595190007303.png
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
MY E-BIKE NEWBIE/POSSIBLY IGNORANT WISHLIST:

Comfort:
It's gotta feel good on my bum for a long ride. More importantly, I want something that fits my 5'2" body and is easy for me to maneuver. My husband has a 4 year old Voltbike Yukon that's WAY too scary for me to feel comfortable on. I have a hand-me-down Specialized Hardrock 15" that is a great size for me. I've tried the Specialized Vado 4.0 Medium size and it was slightly big, but I could probably get used to that size if I had to.

Weather:
I live near SLC, Utah and so it goes from unbearably hot in the summer to freezing cold in the winter. I'd like to be able to use it year round.

Range:
I will want to use pedal assist for the hard stuff and to go longer, but I still want to keep a little bit of a workout. I want to replace my car for everyday errands (most are within a 5 mile radius of my home). But I would also like to go at least 35-ish miles roundtrip to/from my sister's house a couple times a month. And then a few times a year my parents (they have Specialized Vado 4.0) want to do some longer/overnight type trips on well maintained/paved paths.

Terrain:
Mostly well maintained pavement, but it's a bonus if I could venture out on a packed trail every once in a while. Although I live near a lot of good off road trails, it's probably more realistic that I'll go hiking more than mountain biking because then I don't have to deal with a rack. But what do I know? Maybe I'd love it on a trail?

Cargo:
Storage options so I can get groceries and run errands.

A well-designed step-thru frame would work well for you. At that physical stature, you would want to use a bike that doesn't weigh a ton. For example, most men weigh around ~175-200lbs and a 65lbs bike is around 1/3rd or less than that of their weight. Less than 1/3rd weight is a good number to aim for because it makes handling way more comfortable and a pleasure to ride.
Also, when you are moving the bike up the stairs or a car rack, a lighter weight desirable.

If you are 130 lbs and you get a bike like the Yukon which weighs 65 or 70lbs, then the bike weighs half the rider weight. No wonder you feel scary riding your husband's bike.
Not many people are comfortable handling such a bike that weights more than half their weight (may be if you are an expert rider, you can do it). So, a lighter bike would feel more agile, nimble and lend to a pleasant ride experience.

I also agree with your assessment that a bike with torque sensor would be truly delightful. Not all torque sensors are created equal. Bosch, Yamaha, Brose, Shimano etc have very good systems.

We have designed a bike that fits all your criteria but it will be ready early September: https://electricbikereview.com/foru...sings-kick-ass-mama-e-bike.33746/#post-275238

If you would like to ride year-round, you may also want to look at bikes with Gates belt drive. You never have to worry about rust, chain lubrication, road salt on the chain etc.

Most importantly, if you know how to shift gears, you can do away without needing a throttle. You would want at least 500 whr battery or more for a 35 mile round trip without any range anxiety.
 

jaizon

Active Member
Yeah I'm thinking the torque sensor is the right fit for me too. I double checked with the owner of Biktrix and the newest model of the Stunner LT IS a torque sensor, so I think I'm going to go with that one! Wish it were also a mid drive, but I think a hub drive with torque will suite my ability better than a mid drive with cadence.
Says cadence sensor on the website. 😦
 

AVikingsWife

New Member
Says cadence sensor on the website. 😦

It says cadence on the mobile version I noticed, but when you are at a computer it says torque. Let me know if you don't see that same thing. I asked the owner and he said it was torque so I'm guessing the mobile website is somehow out of date.
 

AVikingsWife

New Member
AVikingsWife,
I can so relate to your situation. Although I'm 5'6, my legs are vertically challenged and I have a tough time finding smaller frames. Added to that many manufactures use 700 cc wheels and 2" tires and the end result is a huge wheel that requires an elevator for mounting/dismounting. (lol)
Both my ebikes claim to be step through frames, but are more like mid-step. I would not recommend them as true step through ebikes.

And I'm in agreement with aesthetics. For sure, if you think the bike is ugly, don't even consider it. I personally can't stand the look of a "brick on the downtube", such as the Trek Verve, even though it's one of Trek's top sellers.

Relatively light weight? hmmm....that's a tough one. What's heavy to one person may not be to another one. I only feel the weight of my ebikes when it comes time to haul them, not while riding them.

Saw this bike recently online. It's an Evelo Galaxy. What appealed to me is the wheels are only 24 inches, and thus lower to the ground. Beyond that, I'm not familiar with it.

Please post what you find as I am starting my list of features for my next ebike, and step through/wave frame is number one criteria.

I really appreciate your perspective. I went on a longer ride yesterday with my step-mom's medium step through Specialized Vado 4.0 and I noticed "step through" was a loose description. Haha. It was only slightly lower than my dad's non step-through version. But even though that frame is a little bigger than recommended for my height, I actually felt very comfortable. The only part that was tricky was a quick stop. I can stop and dismount with ease, but it's harder to stop and start again quickly (like at a stop sign).

The Evelo looks nice! I wish it were in stock. I'm willing to wait for the right one, but something in stock is a lot more enticing.
 

Harleyman64

New Member
Tork sensors are better and less maintenance, as well the Bafang motors can be programmed to fit the needs of the rider.
I wouldn't steer you in the wrong direction.
you get exactly what you pay for.
Bixtrix has the best combination of hi end components of any affordable ebikes.
I wish I had brought the Bixtrix Juggernaut Ultra instead of my BPM imports F1000
Power and long distance are what I wanted.
also I would recommend the 48 volt 21Ah upgrade for more power and longer range.
 

EmilyRides

New Member
I read this thread with interest since I am your size and just starting to look at e-bike possibilities. I'm an avid cyclist and have been for a few decades but want to be able to keep up with my faster husband and not suffer quite so much on the hills. I also have a cranky lower bike so am looking for a more upright position than my road bikes.

You said that you rode a medium Specialized Vado -- have you considered a small? I am just about your exact size and am currently looking at the Specialized Turbo Como and Trek Allant+ 7S Stagger as possibilities. I think I decided that even the Small Vado might be a bit large for me, but I can't be sure of that until I can test ride. Not purchasing this year, so I have time. I don't really want to go with small wheels if I can help it.
 

AVikingsWife

New Member
You said that you rode a medium Specialized Vado -- have you considered a small? I am just about your exact size and am currently looking at the Specialized Turbo Como and Trek Allant+ 7S Stagger as possibilities. I think I decided that even the Small Vado might be a bit large for me, but I can't be sure of that until I can test ride. Not purchasing this year, so I have time. I don't really want to go with small wheels if I can help it.

I ended up buying a Biktrix Stunner LT 24" (medium) and it's PERFECT. Short enough to feel comfortable to handle, but big enough that I don't feel like I'm on a toy. I'm on my tippy toes while seated and can easily stop when needed. I'm thrilled with my choice. My parents (who own the Specialized Turbo Vados that I tried) like mine much better than theirs. Much more comfortable, way more power, better on sketchy roads, and almost half the price. Loooove my Stunner!
 

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EmilyRides

New Member
Cool! Glad you found something you really like. Is it a fat bike? Looks like it from the photo. I had a non-electric fat bike when we lived in a beach community, and it also had 24" wheels. Loved it!