Please help with my frustration. Looking for ebike, but.....

I looking for a hassle free, and very reliable ebike, but every bike model I look into I see people posting of issues with the bikes!....this is with every bike I check. This would be my primary mode of transportation, and the bike shop I would be purchasing from is a long ways away. What bike should I be looking at if bullet proof reliability is a concern?......I am in chicago, so hills are not an issue. I am also 5'8 and 215 pounds. Advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

Wes Lem

New Member
If you are looking for a safe and reliable, but affordable Pedelec 3 e-bike that does a lot if most things of things well (as eBikes go) please check out the $1499.99 Juiced Cross Current:

www.juicedbikes.com

I have had mine since the end of October and it has been great. Reliable, Fast, Safe and Trouble Free. I am 6 ' 3 ' 235 Pounds and have been carrying a 14 pound back pack on my daily commute.
 
If you are looking for a safe and reliable, but affordable Pedelec 3 e-bike that does a lot if most things of things well (as eBikes go) please check out the $1499.99 Juiced Cross Current:

www.juicedbikes.com

I have had mine since the end of October and it has been great. Reliable, Fast, Safe and Trouble Free. I am 6 ' 3 ' 235 Pounds and have been carrying a 14 pound back pack on my daily commute.
Thank you, Wes! The price point is great on this bike as well.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
No bike is without issue, they are mechanical and will have problems if not taken care of properly. Are you buying from crazy Lenny in Madison? If not, you should...The day trip will save you a ton (i made it a day trip from Minneapolis so you don't have an excuse!)

The juiced cross current is nice...but you'll be surprised how far your dollar will go with Lenny.

So, what kind of riding will you be doing and what features are you looking for?
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
I think what you are looking for is not necessarily what specific ebike but a strong aftermarket support. I suggest you visit your local ebike store and look at their offerings that has solid warranty and make sure that the store honors warranty related services.
 

Woodenshoe

New Member
Haibike, Haibike, Haibike.... Yamaha drive sduro line.. I own an allmtn SL that is abused daily. I have riden it on the hardest trails imaginable out west. I would not hesitate to recommend that brand, I trust mine. The trekking models are solid bikes with integrated lights and include racks and fenders. Great customer support, and the 2016 models are on sale at a few online dealers.
 
No bike is without issue, they are mechanical and will have problems if not taken care of properly. Are you buying from crazy Lenny in Madison? If not, you should...The day trip will save you a ton (i made it a day trip from Minneapolis so you don't have an excuse!)

The juiced cross current is nice...but you'll be surprised how far your dollar will go with Lenny.

So, what kind of riding will you be doing and what features are you looking for?
I am thinking of Lenny's. I am looking for a car replacement/ daily commuter. My only fear about Lenny's would be getting something serviced if a problem occurs. I don't know if other bike shops near would be of help with warranty/servicing needs. They have many options, and not all bikes are created equal. Lol
 
Haibike, Haibike, Haibike.... Yamaha drive sduro line.. I own an allmtn SL that is abused daily. I have riden it on the hardest trails imaginable out west. I would not hesitate to recommend that brand, I trust mine. The trekking models are solid bikes with integrated lights and include racks and fenders. Great customer support, and the 2016 models are on sale at a few online dealers.
Thank you, for your reply. I was actually looking at their Haibikes. I was reading of many problems people on this board had with them. Is there a reason why you recommend the Yamaha, as opposed to the Bosch?
 

Woodenshoe

New Member
Both are good, Bosch is used across many brands so serving can be done almost anywhere. I prefer Yamaha because the stock sized chainrings peddle as easily as an unpowered bike. Yamaha does not use an idler wheel like Bosch on their fullseven bikes. I prefer the Yamaha displa, it has more information like cadence rpm, battery percentage %, more battery bars (so estimating power usage is more precise) AND a half level assist that is subtile and takes away the weight of the bike. In the low levels the bike is very smooth and it has more peak torque (80nm)... If you can maintain traction, you can go up it.. Yamaha is not new to ebikes either, they have been making mid-drivessince the early nineties.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
Both are good, Bosch is used across many brands so serving can be done almost anywhere. I prefer Yamaha because the stock sized chainrings peddle as easily as an unpowered bike. Yamaha does not use an idler wheel like Bosch on their fullseven bikes. I prefer the Yamaha displa, it has more information like cadence rpm, battery percentage %, more battery bars (so estimating power usage is more precise) AND a half level assist that is subtile and takes away the weight of the bike. In the low levels the bike is very smooth and it has more peak torque (80nm)... If you can maintain traction, you can go up it.. Yamaha is not new to ebikes either, they have been making mid-drivessince the early nineties.

These are all the reasons I recommend the Yamaha over Bosch as well. Brose is like the largest small motor manufacturer in the world too, so you're not going to go wrong either way. Yamaha has been doing ebikes in Japan for over a decade...They are new here but not new to the market by any means. Bottom line is all 3 of these motor companies know what they are doing!
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
I am thinking of Lenny's. I am looking for a car replacement/ daily commuter. My only fear about Lenny's would be getting something serviced if a problem occurs. I don't know if other bike shops near would be of help with warranty/servicing needs. They have many options, and not all bikes are created equal. Lol
Your concern points you toward the solution, call your nearby bike shops and ask which ebike brand can they service under warranty.
 
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Catfish

New Member
Hassle free, very reliable, bullet-proof implies you are unable or unwilling to do-it-yourself.

I assume this refers to e-bike technology rather than routine maintenance (i.e. lube chain, adjust brakes) and repairs (i.e. fix flat tire).

If so, simple would be better than complex or sophisticated. For example, if there are no hills to climb, a light weight, single speed bike with a 250 watt rear hub motor might be a good fit at relatively low price point.

At over 200 lb rider weight, I would consider the strength of rear wheel spokes and overall ride comfort. For example, I started riding e-bike at 245 lbs and broke several rear spokes on brand new bike.

As heavier rider, I also went with e-bike equipped with shock absorbers on front forks and seat post and a spring loaded seat. I would also consider a bike that has wider tires or can accept wider tires (smoother ride, more traction).

Another thing to consider is outgrowing an entry level bike. For example, after a couple years, I’m now an athletic 220 lbs (65 years old) and have eclipsed bike’s capabilities.

Consequently, I would consider spending more time on due diligence. Here, visiting bike shop with knowledgeable people and testing brands and models is invaluable.

After all, if this is principal transportation, you will be living with your decision and you might as well be very comfortable with it.
 

Joe Remi

Active Member
Thank you, for your reply. I was actually looking at their Haibikes. I was reading of many problems people on this board had with them. Is there a reason why you recommend the Yamaha, as opposed to the Bosch?

I'm getting my new Haibike Sduro Trekking from Lenny's on Friday, so I can't verify reliability yet, but I'll update the forum as the miles pile up. I'm sure electric drivetrain issues will be a hassle if I have to work them out with a far away shop, but I do all my bike stuff online so I'm used to dealing with things this way. I'll either figure it out myself, with help from forum members, or hash it out with Lenny's over the phone. For the non-e parts I do my own work, so gimme a holler if you find yourself needing advice on that end..I might be able to talk you through it.

Here's the bike I got from Lenny's. It's a great deal, and you may be able to drive there and save on shipping. Rack, fenders, lights, and it's a great color!

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 
Hassle free, very reliable, bullet-proof implies you are unable or unwilling to do-it-yourself.

I assume this refers to e-bike technology rather than routine maintenance (i.e. lube chain, adjust brakes) and repairs (i.e. fix flat tire).

If so, simple would be better than complex or sophisticated. For example, if there are no hills to climb, a light weight, single speed bike with a 250 watt rear hub motor might be a good fit at relatively low price point.

At over 200 lb rider weight, I would consider the strength of rear wheel spokes and overall ride comfort. For example, I started riding e-bike at 245 lbs and broke several rear spokes on brand new bike.

As heavier rider, I also went with e-bike equipped with shock absorbers on front forks and seat post and a spring loaded seat. I would also consider a bike that has wider tires or can accept wider tires (smoother ride, more traction).

Another thing to consider is outgrowing an entry level bike. For example, after a couple years, I’m now an athletic 220 lbs (65 years old) and have eclipsed bike’s capabilities.

Consequently, I would consider spending more time on due diligence. Here, visiting bike shop with knowledgeable people and testing brands and models is invaluable.

After all, if this is principal transportation, you will be living with your decision and you might as well be very comfortable with it.
Great information, and this is definitely my gripe on the technology. Do you have a bike suggestion(s)? Would appreciate it greatly.
 
I'm getting my new Haibike Sduro Trekking from Lenny's on Friday, so I can't verify reliability yet, but I'll update the forum as the miles pile up. I'm sure electric drivetrain issues will be a hassle if I have to work them out with a far away shop, but I do all my bike stuff online so I'm used to dealing with things this way. I'll either figure it out myself, with help from forum members, or hash it out with Lenny's over the phone. For the non-e parts I do my own work, so gimme a holler if you find yourself needing advice on that end..I might be able to talk you through it.

Here's the bike I got from Lenny's. It's a great deal, and you may be able to drive there and save on shipping. Rack, fenders, lights, and it's a great color!

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
Thanks!!...I was looking at that model, as well as a few others. They really do have some great deals.
 

Joe Remi

Active Member
Thanks!!...I was looking at that model, as well as a few others. They really do have some great deals.

It just depends on how much power and versatility you want, and how much you're willing to risk more complex technology. I don't commute, but I live around big hills so a 250W singlespeed doesn't do it for me. I have a couple conversions with throttle-only 250 front hubs, and they really only qualify as a bit of help on regular bikes. Nice for what they are, but I'm ready for a more powerful integrated bike that operates most of the time while I'm pedaling. I can't wait for Friday!
 
There are a lot of good brands out there these days. Very different from just 10 years ago.
Call me crazy (not Lenny!), but my least problematic brand is Pedego. And if there was..they wrote the book on customer service. JMO
And why am I still a new member...ben on here since 2012!
 

Woodenshoe

New Member
Yes, pedego very reliable! Rock solid brand. Very zippy ride with throttle available in all assist levels. If you like to ride a normal bike then the pedego will feel very laid back with weight up over the rear wheel. If you want to get up out of the seat and pump like a traditional bike then you will feel this weight moving back and forth behind you... A few more comments. A mid-drive bike will have stock wheels on the back. This means less unsprung weight of the rear tire. Less spokes broken. Easy to take off for tire changes. Easy maintenance. A mid-drive utilizes all your gears on the rear sprocket, this means efficiency and that it is easier to tune your cruising speeds and achieve much higher torque for climbing. The Bosch and Yamaha may be more technically sophisticatedbut they are used across many bike brands and are easy to get parts if you break something or if you want an extra battery.
Gary
 

Cameron Newland

Well-Known Member
Bikes with the Bosch mid-drive motor tend to be quite reliable, as are most direct drive hub motor ebikes. The bikes that people tend to avoid due to reliability concerns are the Specialized Turbo and the Stromer ST2. The Turbo has issues with its charger (among other things) and the Stromer ST2 has a strange battery issue in which the battery contacts disconnect while riding and the bike shuts off and cannot be turned on again unless you brought your key with you to remove the battery and place it back again.