POLL: Speed Limit Per Level

AdamT

Member
Region
USA
I recently bought a Level step-through for my wife and we're both finding that the assist is too abrupt throughout the range, and particularly in PAS 1. And this is a bike with the new controller that purportedly addressed the issue. I found that setting the top speed to 20 mph makes PAS 1 much more forgiving, with slower acceleration up to 8 mph instead of a quick sprint to 12 mph. Unfortunately, one then loses the 28 mph top speed!

In my opinion, Aventon should allow the speed setting for each PAS level to be user-defined. In my case, I would choose something like: 1-8, 2-10, 3-12, 4-20, 5-28. That's because we tend to either ride at a leisurely pace, or else want a good turn of speed to keep up with traffic or to get somewhere fast. Rarely are we in the 13-25 mph range.

What would you all set as your PAS speed limits?

PAS 1:
PAS 2:
PAS 3:
PAS 4:
PAS 5:
 

Jacko

New Member
Region
USA
I recently bought a Level step-through for my wife and we're both finding that the assist is too abrupt throughout the range, and particularly in PAS 1. And this is a bike with the new controller that purportedly addressed the issue. I found that setting the top speed to 20 mph makes PAS 1 much more forgiving, with slower acceleration up to 8 mph instead of a quick sprint to 12 mph. Unfortunately, one then loses the 28 mph top speed!

In my opinion, Aventon should allow the speed setting for each PAS level to be user-defined. In my case, I would choose something like: 1-8, 2-10, 3-12, 4-20, 5-28. That's because we tend to either ride at a leisurely pace, or else want a good turn of speed to keep up with traffic or to get somewhere fast. Rarely are we in the 13-25 mph range.

What would you all set as your PAS speed limits?

PAS 1:
PAS 2:
PAS 3:
PAS 4:
PAS 5:
I have 2 bikes an Izip Dash and a Bagi 27. The Izip has 4 levels of assist so it jumps out fast in level 1 and continues the boost in the 3 remaining levels. Now the Bagi on the other hand has, would you believe 9 levels! This makes a more progressive step up in assist which I prefer. Many folks, myself included don't really like that "snappy" assist that bikes like the Izip give. It would be nice to easily program your own bike, which I believe some brands offer.
 

AdamT

Member
Region
USA
Is that behavior that you are experiencing similar with all other e-bikes? Im asking as I dont know.
Basically there are two main options in the ebike world: cadence sensor bikes and torque sensor bikes. Cadence sensor bikes like Aventon are generally alike in that the motor is either on or off and it's going to deliver a fixed amount of power at a given PAS level. Most, but not all, hub motor bikes use cadence/speed sensors only. One exception is Juiced, which is my other bike (CrossCurrent X) which has cadence and torque sensors. I believe most/all mid-drive bikes use torque sensors.

As the name implies, a torque sensor bases its output on the amount of force being applied to the pedals. So in PAS 1 (Eco) mode on my CCX, the motor will put out anywhere from around 25w to 150w of power based on how hard I'm pedaling, and that range increases as I move up the PAS levels. In my opinion the torque sensor delivers a more natural riding experience.
 

Limeybastard

Member
Region
USA
City
Florida Unfortunately.
Basically there are two main options in the ebike world: cadence sensor bikes and torque sensor bikes. Cadence sensor bikes like Aventon are generally alike in that the motor is either on or off and it's going to deliver a fixed amount of power at a given PAS level. Most, but not all, hub motor bikes use cadence/speed sensors only. One exception is Juiced, which is my other bike (CrossCurrent X) which has cadence and torque sensors. I believe most/all mid-drive bikes use torque sensors.

As the name implies, a torque sensor bases its output on the amount of force being applied to the pedals. So in PAS 1 (Eco) mode on my CCX, the motor will put out anywhere from around 25w to 150w of power based on how hard I'm pedaling, and that range increases as I move up the PAS levels. In my opinion the torque sensor delivers a more natural riding experience.
Thanks for the explanation. So in essence could one merely have PAS set to zero and just feather the throttle for assistance for max cardio?
 

Limeybastard

Member
Region
USA
City
Florida Unfortunately.
Theoretically you could do that, but Aventon disables the throttle in peddle-only mode. Juiced does not.
According to the attached statement they dont anymore. But that document isn't clear where one knows what they are purchasing.

 

AdamT

Member
Region
USA
According to the attached statement they dont anymore. But that document isn't clear where one knows what they are purchasing.

Well, not exactly. I have the updated controller, and while it does allow you to use the throttle before peddling in modes 1-5, the throttle doesn’t work *at all* in level 0. Very annoying.
 

theemartymac

Active Member
Well, not exactly. I have the updated controller, and while it does allow you to use the throttle before peddling in modes 1-5, the throttle doesn’t work *at all* in level 0. Very annoying.
Annoying, but critical for safety. You do need a setting where the computer is on and can be manipulated without the risk of the bike moving under power. That is what PAS 0 is for. You can view or change settings, troubleshoot things, or use your walk mode as desired without the bike lurching away because you bumped the pedal or the throttle.

My own bike (Not an Aventon) allows the throttle to 'top up' the torque sensor regardless of the PAS setting, so I can be lollygagging along in PAS 2, and then hammer the throttle for a big hill or quick pass of a car or other biker. The ability to get the full beans on demand is invaluable to me.
 

AdamT

Member
Region
USA
Annoying, but critical for safety. You do need a setting where the computer is on and can be manipulated without the risk of the bike moving under power. That is what PAS 0 is for. You can view or change settings, troubleshoot things, or use your walk mode as desired without the bike lurching away because you bumped the pedal or the throttle.

My own bike (Not an Aventon) allows the throttle to 'top up' the torque sensor regardless of the PAS setting, so I can be lollygagging along in PAS 2, and then hammer the throttle for a big hill or quick pass of a car or other biker. The ability to get the full beans on demand is invaluable to me.
My Juiced bike is the same, but as mentioned, also has the throttle active in PAS 0. It's nice for those times when I'm out to get some exercise, but still want the throttle on occasion to zip across an intersection or up a steep incline. I don't consider it terribly dangerous. If I'm moving the bike about I just turn off the electronics. Of course the throttle can also be disabled altogether in config settings as well.
 

pkchari

New Member
Region
USA
City
Redmond, WA
Yeah, Aventon can easily do that, but the thing is that they don't make any of the components. They have designs and contracts with third-party manufacturers and they take care of assembly in-house. This is how most e-bike brands are -- they are not manufacturers, they're designers. At most, they do assembly, and some don't even do that. Some just buy common parts through and through (why you see so many identical-looking bikes from different brands) and some have their own custom designs for certain parts (which I think applies to Aventon for the frames at least). So in order to have that level of programmability, the only thing they can do is start sourcing a different controller and/or computer from the same manufacturer(s).

But to answer the original poster's question --

PAS 1: 5 mph
PAS 2: 10 mph
PAS 3: 15 mph
PAS 4: 20 mph
PAS 5: 28 mph

The lower speeds in the lower PAS levels are pretty key. 5 mph is slow enough that even if it jerks off the start, it's a slow enough speed to not jar anyone. Though to be fair, I choose that as my speed mainly because my bikes are also shared with in-laws in their 70s -- not just myself and my wife.