Posture help needed!

bigcanoe

Member
I need some posture help! I rode my bike about 7 miles on Saturday and my tailbone is really sore. I am thinking I need to raise my seat or lower my handle bars, I may be sitting too upright. Does anyone have a geometry or seat adjustment guide they use for these folding, small fat tire bikes? I was using the stock seat, stock seat post, and sweat pants (no padding).
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I need some posture help! I rode my bike about 7 miles on Saturday and my tailbone is really sore. I am thinking I need to raise my seat or lower my handle bars, I may be sitting too upright. Does anyone have a geometry or seat adjustment guide they use for these folding, small fat tire bikes? I was using the stock seat, stock seat post, and sweat pants (no padding).
If you're just getting back to biking, give yourself some time. Backsides and saddles need time to get broken in.

When you say 'tailbone', do you mean the base of your spine, or do you mean your sit bones (the 2 bones that you sit on)? If it's the spine, then make some changes now. If it's your sit bones, give yourself some time before spending money. Try some padded under shorts. When I cycle every day, I don't really need any padding. When I ride less, I can get sore without padding. You will toughen up with time in the saddle, the padded under shorts can help a lot. After any layoff from bike riding most will suffer some soreness.

Best of luck!
 

bigcanoe

Member
I think its my sit bones? It hurts when I first sit in a chair and when I get up. And I havent ridden a bike in decades! I can try the padded shorts first, no big cost there.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I think its my sit bones? It hurts when I first sit in a chair and when I get up. And I havent ridden a bike in decades! I can try the padded shorts first, no big cost there.
There are services available to get a bike to fit the rider. If you're interested Google 'bike fitter near me'. They do all sorts of measuring and make suggestions for a proper fit. Some will adjust your bike to fit you. You might need some new accessories. It's worth it if you can't get there on your own.

I would get the shorts, adjust the saddle height for proper leg extension and slowly increase your time in the saddle.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Pearl Izumi make some great padded liners, not the best price. If you have a Dick's sporting goods store nearby, they sell Canari padded cycling liners. For your first pair I recommend buying in person. Buying online can be tricky. When you read reviews for online liners from China the sizing is often way off. People will suggest buying XXL if you wear 34" pants. You can buy padded liner shorts at any bike shop as well. They should be tight, without cutting off your circulation. And look for ones designed for mountain biking. Road riding liners often don't have a large enough pad. Don't worry, you'll get used to feeling like you're walking around with a load in your pants😖
 

ki11a

Well-Known Member
You need swept back grips/handlebars so you can sit in a more natural position and straighten out your back. This was an issue for me also when I first started riding the XP but with a handlebar upgrade those problems quickly went away.
 

bigcanoe

Member
Oh ok, thats good to know! I was actually thinking I wanted to lean more forward to get pressure off the tail.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Padded pants aren’t really intended to correct a sore tailbone. A proper seat, adjusted correctly, would be my first suggestion. It could easily be that your existing seat can work with a proper adjustment. I haven’t worn padded shorts since the ‘80s. I’d try the seat/handlebar adjustment first. You can the get a better seat and, if necessary, try padded shorts. I changed out my seat to the Serfas E-Gel (with cutout) but that’s more for nerve issues in the crotch. It’s very comfy and I never have to bother with special shorts. Good luck!
D2B4540F-9571-4694-98D8-91A16D090326.jpeg
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
BTW, you didn’t say what exact ebike you’re using. Pictures of how you have it set up might help.
 

Luto

Active Member
Also remember you ride on the bike versus sit on the bike. That means you legs often are lifting or relieving the pressure on your sit bones. If you watch carefully, you will see experienced cyclist look like they are walking on the bike versus sitting and pedaling. A good saddle and proper technique can help a lot. Padded shorts and seats can help, but they only offset the forces of gravity going down. Just try to not make so much down force all the time and give yourself some intermittent relief.. Hope that helps.

But of course make sure your seat height is correct and your reach to the handlebars is correct.
 

bigcanoe

Member
I was doing alot of sitting and pedaling, thats for sure. I will try changing up my technique as well as look at my seat and post, handle bar height, etc.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I need some posture help! I rode my bike about 7 miles on Saturday and my tailbone is really sore. I am thinking I need to raise my seat or lower my handle bars, I may be sitting too upright. Does anyone have a geometry or seat adjustment guide they use for these folding, small fat tire bikes? I was using the stock seat, stock seat post, and sweat pants (no padding).

Give it a couple of weeks and the pain will go away. I started back into riding bikes with a Lectric XP and my tailbone was sore as heck for the first couple of weeks. After that, it goes away and you wont even remember tailbone tenderness!
 

bigcanoe

Member
Give it a couple of weeks and the pain will go away. I started back into riding bikes with a Lectric XP and my tailbone was sore as heck for the first couple of weeks. After that, it goes away and you wont even remember tailbone tenderness!
That is very encouraging, thank you! I cant wait to get back on it but I am hesitant to make the situation worse.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
The seat looks pretty level at the moment, which is a good starting place. I would make sure your knees are slightly bent when your pedal is at the bottom of the stroke. If over extended, lower the seat. If overly bent, lift the seat. Once adjusted, see if the handlebar reach is comfortable and adjust as necessary. You may need to also slide the seat forward or backward or tilt it one way or the other.🤓
 

Retired in GA

New Member
Region
USA
Padded pants aren’t really intended to correct a sore tailbone. A proper seat, adjusted correctly, would be my first suggestion. It could easily be that your existing seat can work with a proper adjustment. I haven’t worn padded shorts since the ‘80s. I’d try the seat/handlebar adjustment first. You can the get a better seat and, if necessary, try padded shorts. I changed out my seat to the Serfas E-Gel (with cutout) but that’s more for nerve issues in the crotch. It’s very comfy and I never have to bother with special shorts. Good luck!
View attachment 74210
That Serfas E-Gel seat looks super comfy. I just got a Trek Verve+ 3 and would like a more comfy seat even though it comes stock with a wider seat than the Allant+. As the Verve is a more upright sit than your Allant, do you think this seat would be a good choice for me? I am a large guy...
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
That Serfas E-Gel seat looks super comfy. I just got a Trek Verve+ 3 and would like a more comfy seat even though it comes stock with a wider seat than the Allant+. As the Verve is a more upright sit than your Allant, do you think this seat would be a good choice for me? I am a large guy...
I'm no seat expert but I did just buy another one as a backup.
 

Retired in GA

New Member
Region
USA
Also remember you ride on the bike versus sit on the bike. That means you legs often are lifting or relieving the pressure on your sit bones. If you watch carefully, you will see experienced cyclist look like they are walking on the bike versus sitting and pedaling. A good saddle and proper technique can help a lot. Padded shorts and seats can help, but they only offset the forces of gravity going down. Just try to not make so much down force all the time and give yourself some intermittent relief.. Hope that helps.

But of course make sure your seat height is correct and your reach to the handlebars is correct.
Good point for the more aggressive riders such as road racers and others whose riding position has them leaning forward. However, on the OP's LECTRIC bike as well as many more casual bikes with handlebars higher than the seat (like my Trek Verve) it seems we are actually sitting on the bike moreso than "riding" the bike. I know I am more comfortable sitting more upright than leaning forward when I am riding casually. If I were racing or climbing a hill and had to apply more pedal pressure I'd probably benefit from leaning forward and pulling against the handlebar to enable me to generate that extra pedal power. But with my e-bike I simply select a mode with more assist as needed. I'll have to try reducing the downward force to see if that might help relive some of the pressure on my butt and tailbone.