Priority Current - Delivery & Assembly - Initial Feedback

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
Not sure if this will be particularly helpful to anyone else, but I'm eager to share my first impressions after receiving delivery of my new Current bike this afternoon.

DELIVERY ► A-
Arrived via FedEx, who set the moderately heavy box on my porch (upside down) and drove off without ringing the doorbell, much less asking for a signature. So much for Priority Bicycles' insistence (via multiple emails leading up to today) that an "Adult Signature Required". On a more positive note, the parcel arrived quickly (on a Thursday, having shipped on Monday morning, after ordering on a Friday afternoon) and without any noticeable damage. The double-boxing in thick cardboard ensures safety in transit, but the method of securing components inside the box leaves much to be desired. Some of the tubes and padding inserted to prevent shifting, for example, were completely dislodged, while a few of the straps and cardboard inserts were so loose as to question their effectiveness. Nevertheless, the bike parts themselves emerged unscathed! No paint chips, bent or missing parts.

ASSEMBLY ► B+
With decades' experience assembling, tuning and modifying bikes of all kinds, I found the necessary steps of putting together the Current to be straightforward and uncomplicated. Perhaps the "fiddliest bits" involved attaching the front fender (find the required bolt inside the box with the charger), since that meant unscrewing and re-attaching three bolts+washers followed by tweaking two more bolts at the friction fittings.
Likewise, attaching, aligning and orienting the handlebars required a good deal of forethought — not just for things like cable routing (the fork arrives turned about 270 degrees clockwise from its intended direction), but also stem angle (default is +10 degrees), handlebar pitch (totally subjective) and centering (no white markings to go by) — especially with all the loose items vying for space. Of note was the odd placement of the headlight "inside" the LCD display's bracket (whose mounting screws require an unusual 2.5mm Allen key, btw) rather than off to one side, where I ultimately moved it. Because the handlebars are not of uniform diameter, but instead taper to the left and right of the stem bolts, I had to get creative on where to secure the headlight; turns out sliding the display's bracket slightly off-center toward the non-drive side helped with that. Conversely, the front (white) reflector's clamp ring's smaller diameter allowed it to be placed more freely to the left of center, where I happen to like it.
Pretty much everything else – pedals, rear fender (which at least comes attached at 2 of its 4 main supports), seat, rear reflector – proceeded without much fanfare or worry. The Li-ion battery came fully charged, but be advised that its dedicated charger does emit a noticeable (though not at all annoying) amount of fan noise during charging.

FIT AND FINISH ► A+
I can't say enough good things about the build quality of this bike! Paint is immaculate. Wheels, rims and spokes suggest a robustness that I find reassuring even ahead of taking my first test ride. The rear drivetrain is truly a thing of beauty, not least in how the Gates belt drive and Enviolo hub combine seamlessly with such clean lines and an aura of solid function. Even the disc brakes seem, well, beefy! Ditto the brake levers and overall hardware, which all appear to have been meticulously sourced by the team at Priority. They even picked the exact type of seat (Selle Royale gel, if I read it right) that I might have selected myself. Skewer and various quick releases I engaged worked flawlessly and are well machined.
A special mention is warranted of the bike's wheels and spokes, insofar as fellow Clydesdale riders may want to know that (a) the hubs are 36-hole (nice touch!), and (b) the spokes appear to be quite stout (13 gauge?). The rims and disc brakes both run true and none of the spokes required tensioning. Will check again soon.

TUNING AND FIRST RIDE ► A++ with honors
My 1st ride was delayed 24 hours owing to a sprained back, but today I finally managed with minimal pain to hop into the saddle for a quick spin, and here are my immediate impressions:
  • Beware the "pokey" corners of the LCD display, which love to stab you in the belly at a stop if you slide forward off-saddle like I do. I will definitely be angling the display up (toward the front of the bike) to alleviate this problem, especially since the seat rails leave very little wiggle room for sliding the saddle rearward. Granted, to the extent that I *could* shift the seat aft, should the need arise to compensate in my overall reach, I can simply raise the handlebar up slightly more.
  • Let's talk about power... OMG, I did not expect this much oomph in an electric bike (this is my first-ever e-bike, mind you) with someone as heavy as me (340+ lbs. unclothed). Level 5 is absolute insanity which magnifies every crack and undulation of the street surface, sending this ride past onlookers "in a blur". Takes maybe 3 revolutions of the pedals to achieve top speed! Pretty sure I'm going to be spending a lot of my time in Level 1, because...
  • Going motorless!? I covered the first few blocks of my test ride with the display turned OFF, to get a sense of how well the Current pedals and handles without assistance. Color me shocked! Under my own power, this bike feels every bit as nimble and efficient as my traditional Trek hybrid, no matter what "gear" of the CVP I happen to be in. (Granted, my Trek is fully loaded so probably doesn't weigh much less than the Priority.) I'm frankly astonished by the touted 380% range of the Enviolo hub, how smoothly it shifts, plus the convenience of being able to adjust its ratio whenever and however much I want to dial in just the right feel or cadence.
  • Hub's hidden "taller gear"? As other Enviolo enthusiasts have suggested, once you've "throttled" into the highest (fastest) ratio, there's still a little gas left in the tank. Access it by scrolling the shifter just a skosh more (toward the "flat terrain" end) while pedaling. Feel it go higher? Repeat. Repeat again. I think I manage to squeeze four more of these "bumps" into taller gear ratios as I went. Handy!
    IMPORTANT: Enviolo's own service literature warns riders NOT TO DO THIS, especially on new ebikes whose shifting might be stiffer for the first 500 miles. Over-shifting risks rendering the shift system inoperable!
  • Stealth. Everybody I've shown the Current to says the same thing, "That doesn't look like an electric bike." Then they ask, "Is that a carbon fiber frame?" "Where does the battery go?" I know Priority doesn't market this model as a "stealth e-bike" but honestly they should consider doing so!
  • Ground clearance. I mentioned this potential issue previously, but can now confirm I'm able to scrape the heel of my shoe against the pavement if I try. Best keep your feet level or ankles slightly elevated to avoid inadvertent contact with road obstacles.
  • Motor noise. This bike is so quiet that it barely merits mentioning the volume or character of the noise emitted during pedal assist. If I had to draw a comparison, I'd say the whirring of the motor sounds a bit like a kitchen faucet you left running at 10% – kind of a constant, inoffensive high-pitched whine. The volume is so negligible as to become entirely masked by wind or road noise. Its pitch remains fairly constant – think "tea kettle ready a few rooms away, over an unsteady flame" – neither falling nor rising more than a half-tone in unison with other inputs like cadence or power level setting. It's either off (no pedaling) or on (while pedaling), with the starts and stops very closely timed to your feet pushing or pausing. In case you're wondering, with power "Off" or in Level 0, there is zero motor noise. Even while in motion the bike is so eerily quiet that doubt anyone will hear me coming.
BATTERY RANGE ► A
I'm giving this topic its own subsection largely because I plan to continually update it with ongoing data. I know prospective buyers place a lot of weight on just how far a particular bike can travel under controlled circumstances, but since my rides are always going to be a mixed bag, I'll just do my best to note which Assist levels were used, average speed, the total mileage traveled, type of terrain covered, bars remaining.
STARTING WITH FULL CHARGE (100% = 4 LED lights on battery = 10 bars on LCD display)
RIDE 1: 5 miles mostly in 0, 1, 2 over level ground @ 4-12 MPH (incl. 2 overpasses) ► 9 bars
RIDE 2: 8 miles mostly in 1, 2, 3, 4 over level ground @ 6-20 MPH (incl. 2 overpasses) ► 7 bars
RIDE 3: 11 miles mostly in 3, 4, 5 over level ground @ 12-23 MPH ► 3 bars
CHARGED TO 100% (Note: From 30%, achieved 75% in 1 hr., 100% in 2 hrs.)

QUIBBLES ► My own subjective feedback
I will update this section as things arise, but for now, let me enumerate some points of interest:
  • Ground clearance – Due to the frame design, minimum pedal height from level ground appears to be 1/4 - 1/2" less than that of my previous daily driver (Trek Zektor hybrid 56cm), which may be a significant enough difference to warrant added caution when taking tight turns, as someone mentioned in a previous thread. While I somehow doubt this will become a problem for me (who already rides very carefully, with my inside pedal always pinned at the 12 o'clock position), riders who use extra-wide pedals and/or pedal extensions should remain extra cautious.
  • Seat comfort – Meh. Atop the stock seat, my hindquarters don't seem to mind 3-5 mile rides too much, exhibiting only minor numbness or soreness the following day. But after a 10+ mile excursion, my entire undercarriage aches in ways it's not supposed to. Hence I intend to swap the seat out for an even plusher, beefier model by Selle, which includes more substantial rails that may better withstand shifting the seat fore or aft to suit my junk. The roads of New Orleans are unforgiving with their innumerable potholes and bike lane irregularities; combined with a stiff frame and heavy rider, this is the perfect storm for posterior pounding. I may also swap out the seat post for my Thudbuster.
  • Frame lock mounts – I would like to have seen Priority include a pair of braze-ons at the rear triangle specifically for the addition of a café (a/k/a metro) lock, rather than relegate such security to aftermarket "strap-on" devices. Heck, if I had my druthers, a frame lock would have been included, and honestly should be at this price point.
  • Gates Carbon Drive belt – Seems they have begun outfitting the Current with the slightly more reliable "CDX" model (with its telltale ribbed surface) rather than the "CDN" (smooth outer surface) belt. That's a nice little upgrade, something not yet reflected in company literature. I haven't yet checked the belt's tension using the Gates mobile app, but the suggested readings are mentioned both in the included paper manual as well as within the free CarbonDrive app.
  • Wish list items – Beyond that, would I like to have seen a rack as standard equipment? Yes. A suspension fork? Maybe (though probably not, as I understand that a suspension stem accomplishes much of the same effect for far less cost and weight). Beefier seat rails? Perhaps (as a Clydesdale rider, I tend to break regular gauge ones within a year). Mirror? Yes (although admittedly no single style suits all riders). Narrower handlebar? Open for debate.
  • Charger noise – Incredibly (and annoyingly), the constant fan noise coming from the included battery charger while plugged in is substantially louder than that of the bike's motor. I can easily hear it from two rooms away, and I'm not known for my excellent hearing. Makes me wish had electricity in the bike shed, so I could charge the battery there instead.
PRO TIPS
  • Tires – Be sure to inflate yours to the maximum PSI stamped on the sidewall, which in the case of the Goodyear Transit Tour 650b tires that come with my 2022 Current, is 70 PSI (I went with 60 PSI). Initially, my front was only at 25 PSI while the rear was at 40 PSI. I'm sure this is another "safety while shipping" precaution taken at the factory warehouse.
  • Password – Take the time to set a 4-digit password on the controller (under PARAMETERS), so that nobody can casually hop on your bike and ride it away under power. Easier than carrying a key!
  • Lock(s) – I found a couple of Abus Bordo Combo 6100 folding locks (resettable 4-digit combination with no need for a key) in "Open Box" condition on eBay, and highly recommend these as a sensible balance between cost, security, form and function. They are hefty yet fold compactly and fit the Current's frame (at least the L) in several convenient places. I plan to use one through the rear triangle and one to secure the front wheel separately, for 2x+ the peace of mind.
  • Rack – Went with another Current owner's suggestion of the Topeak MTX rear rack system, combining their Explorer rack with the matched DXP trunk bag, which is ridiculously capacious and expandable. I don't plan to leave the bag on the bike in my absence, so the slide-to-mount-plus-clip system makes total sense, along with the bag's inherent water resistance. For heavy rain, I'll deploy a garbage back over the whole rack system, though Topeak does offer a dedicated rain cover for $20-30 online.
 
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TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
NOTES FROM MY FIRST HIGH-ASSIST RIDE ABOARD THE CURRENT

Left home at 11:45am for this 16-mile round trip ride, with 60 PSI in the tires and 100% on the battery. My objectives were to (a) ride as far in one direction as I could on Assist Level 4, (b) return via the same route on Level 5, and (c) monitor my cadence and speed, as well as gauge battery bars, along the way. Got back exactly 60 minutes later with nothing left in the tank (battery and rider, physically). The following notes come from memory, not a route-tracking app (I would normally use Strava, Google My Tracks, or RideWithGPS for that purpose).

PRELIMINARY ADVISORY
Even if you think you're just "taking the Current out for a quick spin", I strongly urge you to take your bike tools and flat repair kit along regardless. It's entirely possible on this bike to wind up many miles from home, to the point where "walking it back" might exceed your capacity. Even pedaling the Current sans battery can quickly become a trudge. Likewise, bring your customary hydration along because, although cruising along at high speed feeling the breeze may trick your brain into thinking "I'm not sweating at all", you can still lose fluids through evaporation, respiration, and other bodily processes during a long adventure.

OUTBOUND SEGMENT
Averaging about 20 MPH throughout, I rode the outbound leg of today's journey exclusively in Assist Level 4, with the Enviolo hub set to "flat" or "near flat" the entire time. Outdoor temperature on this sunny day was steady at 85F, with no appreciable wind. My route initially consisted of the shoulder of a 3-lane highway, leading to a (very) smooth paved road, turning onto a paved levee trail heading up the Mississippi River. My "turn around" criteria were either "10 miles on the odometer" or "5 bars on the display", whichever came first.
The display dropped down to exactly 5 bars at the 8-mile mark, around 25 minutes since departure, so I stopped and turned around, resting for about a minute to allow the battery to cool a bit. I then bumped up the Assist Level from 4 to 5 and commenced the return trip.

INBOUND SEGMENT
Averaging 23 MPH for the next 2 miles, I could certainly feel the additional "oomph" of Level 5, but that sensation quickly abated precisely when the "bars" fell to 4 remaining. That's also about when my average speed dropped noticeably (to around 19 MPH), and my legs felt like they were back in Level 4. Thereafter, with each passing mile, the battery bars fell again to 3, then to 2, whereupon I began to question how Priority programmed the so-called "discharge matrix" for this bike's battery. They clearly have placed an emphasis on maximizing ride time over delivering the highest possible assistance, once the battery reaches 2 bars remaining.

PETERING OUT
As before, there was neither a headwind nor tailwind present to skew my results, and I tried to keep my pedaling cadence consistent over the otherwise level terrain. At precisely 51 minutes into the ride, with the trip odometer showing 14 miles, all assistance vanished. So I turned off the display, leaving me to pedal home under my own power. Over the following 7 minutes, I pondered the stark difference between mindlessly racing about in Level 4 or 5, compared with plodding along in the single digits. Contrary to my earliest impressions, while human-powered the Current really does feel like a heavy bike suffering from under-inflated tires. Such is the juxtaposition of "battery" vs. "no battery."

On the plus side, two minutes from home, I decided to turn the display back on and found to my surprise 1 battery bar visible, so I bumped her into Level 2, enabling me to achieve a somewhat spritely clip over the final 500 yards of my excursion. Home again!

HIDDEN RESERVE?

While plugging in the battery charger, I took a moment to observe how many of the battery's bright green LED lights would illuminate upon pressing its "Test" button. Thinking the answer should be "Zero", imagine my delight when not 1, but 2 LEDs lit up! This adds more weight to my "maximum ride time" theory in which the battery does whatever it can to postpone dropping all the way to 0% — which, let's face it, is never good for the battery's health and longevity — by keeping a little reserve leftover.

WARNING: If you want your Current's battery to last its longest, avoid the aggressive 0%-Charge-100%-Discharge-0% cycle that I just put mine through. By favoring a maximum charge of 80-90% and stopping your rides once the charge depletes to 20%, I'm told you can expect more than double the lifetime number of recharges. Definitely something to consider when replacement batteries cost over $500!

Any questions?
- Tim G.
 

BobR

New Member
Region
USA
Thanks @TimGNO . Good to see you enjoying riding!
I found on my first long trip with my Priority Current the drop in power happened sooner than it now does. In fact the display went nuts, first level 5 power felt like a drop to 2 or 3 with four bars left, then the display went to one flashing bar. But that doesn’t happen anymore. Perhaps battery conditioning after a few recharges helped the software estimate better? I too can tell when level 5 assist drops to more like 4, but I don’t find it happening at 4 bars, more like 2 bars.
Yes, the green lights on the battery show higher percent of charge left. For a while I was comparing, and even using a volt meter. Decided it wasn’t worth exploring anymore. I don’t worry about storing my bike at 2 bars left on the display, as I figure it is well above the 20% minimum in reality.

I’ve learned I can make it to work and back no matter how hard I’m pushing the battery and motor, so it is only the loss of level 5 on the very last 8% hill that I sometimes miss.

For battery health, I try not to full-charge the battery until I’m just about to use it. Now that I’ve bought a second charger to leave under my desk at work I don’t worry if the charge cycle hasn’t stopped after breakfast, as I know I can just start riding and top it off a little during lunch at the office when I’m afraid to lose level 5 on the way back home.
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
Update: After a series of medium-duty rides with a speed averaging 10-15 MPH on mostly level ground, with outside temperature around 85F, I've concluded that my maximum expected range on a single battery charge tracks according to this chart:

Assist Level 1 = Untested
Assist Level 2 = 40 miles
Assist Level 3 = 30 miles
Assist Level 4 = 20-25 miles
Assist Level 5 = 15-20 miles
 
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TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
WARNINGS

1. Be aware that, without a proper motor cut-off switch in the braking system, the Current can (and will, under certain predictable circumstances) lurch forward. This will typically happen while stopped, if you have dismounted without turning off the display or setting it back to Level 0. For instance, the other day, while standing next to my bike (still On and set to Level 2) with a foot resting on one pedal, I suddenly had to hold it back as the bike forcefully tried to move without me.

SOLUTION: If planning to dismount or stand idle for a while, switch display Off or click '' until back in Level 0.

2. Be sure to test your disc brakes to make sure the system exhibits no sponginess or fade during initial pull, and that the levers do not over-pull (should always leave at least a finger's width clearance between lever and grip). My Current apparently suffered from quite a few air bubbles in both lines – front and rear – so I had to bleed them. (EDIT: Twice. And again. And once again. So many air bubbles!)

SOLUTION: Using a dedicated Shimano/Tektro/TRP disc brake bleed kit, plus a bottle of mineral oil, follow the suggested steps on bleeding your brakes until no air bubbles appear.
 
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TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
SPOKES

Turns out I'm still a heavy rider, and I've managed to bust 3 or more of my rear spokes in just under 90 miles of riding. For reference sake, here's the spec for all models:
  • Front wheel L: 268mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
  • Front wheel R: 269mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
  • Rear wheel Shimano L: 247mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
  • Rear wheel Shimano R: 246mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
  • Rear wheel Enviolo L: 238mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
  • Rear wheel Enviolo R: 236mm/ 13g spoke (2.3mm)
Priority kindly offered to remunerate me for the cost of my LBS replacing them and truing the wheel, which is a very fair deal. I'm also exploring the possibility of beefing them up to the next higher gauge if the Enviolo hub will accept larger spokes, which is highly unlikely.

CHECK YOUR SPOKE TENSION, FOLKS!!

BONUS:
I created a Spoke Tension template over on Park Tool's website, which you are more than welcome to copy (by scrolling down and clicking SAVE DUPLICATE immediately after reaching the linked page). Bookmark the resulting URL for future reference! Then edit the data with your own bike's spoke tensions and click SAVE to update.
 
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etiej

Member
Region
USA
The hardest thing about setting up my Priority Current for me was removing all the packaging. They really worked hard to protect that bike.
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
The hardest thing about setting up my Priority Current for me was removing all the packaging. They really worked hard to protect that bike.
OMG 1000x yes. So much packaging, it took me another 2-3 days to clear it all out via the Recycling and Trash bins out front. :)
I even managed to create a whole other cardboard box, to ship out an eBay item, by cutting large squares out of the sides of the outer container. Saved all the zip ties, though! (Pro tip: You can always "back out" a zip tie by inserting a very small, thin blade into the catch, then back out the tongue intact and reuse.)
 

etiej

Member
Region
USA
Not sure if this will be particularly helpful to anyone else, but I'm eager to share my first impressions after receiving delivery of my new Current bike this afternoon.

DELIVERY ► A-
Arrived via FedEx, who set the moderately heavy box on my porch (upside down) and drove off without ringing the doorbell, much less asking for a signature. So much for Priority Bicycles' insistence (via multiple emails leading up to today) that an "Adult Signature Required". On a more positive note, the parcel arrived quickly (on a Thursday, having shipped on Monday morning, after ordering on a Friday afternoon) and without any noticeable damage. The double-boxing in thick cardboard ensures safety in transit, but the method of securing components inside the box leaves much to be desired. Some of the tubes and padding inserted to prevent shifting, for example, were completely dislodged, while a few of the straps and cardboard inserts were so loose as to question their effectiveness. Nevertheless, the bike parts themselves emerged unscathed! No paint chips, bent or missing parts.

ASSEMBLY ► B+
With decades' experience assembling, tuning and modifying bikes of all kinds, I found the necessary steps of putting together the Current to be straightforward and uncomplicated. Perhaps the "fiddliest bits" involved attaching the front fender (find the required bolt inside the box with the charger), since that meant unscrewing and re-attaching three bolts+washers followed by tweaking two more bolts at the friction fittings.
Likewise, attaching, aligning and orienting the handlebars required a good deal of forethought — not just for things like cable routing (the fork arrives turned about 270 degrees clockwise from its intended direction), but also stem angle (default is +10 degrees), handlebar pitch (totally subjective) and centering (no white markings to go by) — especially with all the loose items vying for space. Of note was the odd placement of the headlight "inside" the LCD display's bracket (whose mounting screws require an unusual 2.5mm Allen key, btw) rather than off to one side, where I ultimately moved it. Because the handlebars are not of uniform diameter, but instead taper to the left and right of the stem bolts, I had to get creative on where to secure the headlight; turns out sliding the display's bracket slightly off-center toward the non-drive side helped with that. Conversely, the front (white) reflector's clamp ring's smaller diameter allowed it to be placed more freely to the left of center, where I happen to like it.
Pretty much everything else – pedals, rear fender (which at least comes attached at 2 of its 4 main supports), seat, rear reflector – proceeded without much fanfare or worry. The Li-ion battery came fully charged, but be advised that its dedicated charger does emit a noticeable (though not at all annoying) amount of fan noise during charging.

FIT AND FINISH ► A+
I can't say enough good things about the build quality of this bike! Paint is immaculate. Wheels, rims and spokes suggest a robustness that I find reassuring even ahead of taking my first test ride. The rear drivetrain is truly a thing of beauty, not least in how the Gates belt drive and Enviolo hub combine seamlessly with such clean lines and an aura of solid function. Even the disc brakes seem, well, beefy! Ditto the brake levers and overall hardware, which all appear to have been meticulously sourced by the team at Priority. They even picked the exact type of seat (Selle Royale gel, if I read it right) that I might have selected myself. Skewer and various quick releases I engaged worked flawlessly and are well machined.
A special mention is warranted of the bike's wheels and spokes, insofar as fellow Clydesdale riders may want to know that (a) the hubs are 36-hole (nice touch!), and (b) the spokes appear to be quite stout (13 gauge?). The rims and disc brakes both run true and none of the spokes required tensioning. Will check again soon.

TUNING AND FIRST RIDE ► A++ with honors
My 1st ride was delayed 24 hours owing to a sprained back, but today I finally managed with minimal pain to hop into the saddle for a quick spin, and here are my immediate impressions:
  • Beware the "pokey" corners of the LCD display, which love to stab you in the belly at a stop if you slide forward off-saddle like I do. I will definitely be angling the display up (toward the front of the bike) to alleviate this problem, especially since the seat rails leave very little wiggle room for sliding the saddle rearward. Granted, to the extent that I *could* shift the seat aft, should the need arise to compensate in my overall reach, I can simply raise the handlebar up slightly more.
  • Let's talk about power... OMG, I did not expect this much oomph in an electric bike (this is my first-ever e-bike, mind you) with someone as heavy as me (340+ lbs. unclothed). Level 5 is absolute insanity which magnifies every crack and undulation of the street surface, sending this ride past onlookers "in a blur". Takes maybe 3 revolutions of the pedals to achieve top speed! Pretty sure I'm going to be spending a lot of my time in Level 1, because...
  • Going motorless!? I covered the first few blocks of my test ride with the display turned OFF, to get a sense of how well the Current pedals and handles without assistance. Color me shocked! Under my own power, this bike feels every bit as nimble and efficient as my traditional Trek hybrid, no matter what "gear" of the CVP I happen to be in. (Granted, my Trek is fully loaded so probably doesn't weigh much less than the Priority.) I'm frankly astonished by the touted 380% range of the Enviolo hub, how smoothly it shifts, plus the convenience of being able to adjust its ratio whenever and however much I want to dial in just the right feel or cadence.
  • Hub's hidden "taller gear"? As other Enviolo enthusiasts have suggested, once you've "throttled" into the highest (fastest) ratio, there's still a little gas left in the tank. Access it by scrolling the shifter just a skosh more (toward the "flat terrain" end) while pedaling. Feel it go higher? Repeat. Repeat again. I think I manage to squeeze four more of these "bumps" into taller gear ratios as I went. Handy!
    IMPORTANT: Enviolo's own service literature warns riders NOT TO DO THIS, especially on new ebikes whose shifting might be stiffer for the first 500 miles. Over-shifting risks rendering the shift system inoperable!
  • Stealth. Everybody I've shown the Current to says the same thing, "That doesn't look like an electric bike." Then they ask, "Is that a carbon fiber frame?" "Where does the battery go?" I know Priority doesn't market this model as a "stealth e-bike" but honestly they should consider doing so!
  • Ground clearance. I mentioned this potential issue previously, but can now confirm I'm able to scrape the heel of my shoe against the pavement if I try. Best keep your feet level or ankles slightly elevated to avoid inadvertent contact with road obstacles.
  • Motor noise. This bike is so quiet that it barely merits mentioning the volume or character of the noise emitted during pedal assist. If I had to draw a comparison, I'd say the whirring of the motor sounds a bit like a kitchen faucet you left running at 10% – kind of a constant, inoffensive high-pitched whine. The volume is so negligible as to become entirely masked by wind or road noise. Its pitch remains fairly constant – think "tea kettle ready a few rooms away, over an unsteady flame" – neither falling nor rising more than a half-tone in unison with other inputs like cadence or power level setting. It's either off (no pedaling) or on (while pedaling), with the starts and stops very closely timed to your feet pushing or pausing. In case you're wondering, with power "Off" or in Level 0, there is zero motor noise. Even while in motion the bike is so eerily quiet that doubt anyone will hear me coming.
BATTERY RANGE ► A
I'm giving this topic its own subsection largely because I plan to continually update it with ongoing data. I know prospective buyers place a lot of weight on just how far a particular bike can travel under controlled circumstances, but since my rides are always going to be a mixed bag, I'll just do my best to note which Assist levels were used, average speed, the total mileage traveled, type of terrain covered, bars remaining.
STARTING WITH FULL CHARGE (100% = 4 LED lights on battery = 10 bars on LCD display)
RIDE 1: 5 miles mostly in 0, 1, 2 over level ground @ 4-12 MPH (incl. 2 overpasses) ► 9 bars
RIDE 2: 8 miles mostly in 1, 2, 3, 4 over level ground @ 6-20 MPH (incl. 2 overpasses) ► 7 bars
RIDE 3: 11 miles mostly in 3, 4, 5 over level ground @ 12-23 MPH ► 3 bars
CHARGED TO 100% (Note: From 30%, achieved 75% in 1 hr., 100% in 2 hrs.)

QUIBBLES ► My own subjective feedback
I will update this section as things arise, but for now, let me enumerate some points of interest:
  • Ground clearance – Due to the frame design, minimum pedal height from level ground appears to be 1/4 - 1/2" less than that of my previous daily driver (Trek Zektor hybrid 56cm), which may be a significant enough difference to warrant added caution when taking tight turns, as someone mentioned in a previous thread. While I somehow doubt this will become a problem for me (who already rides very carefully, with my inside pedal always pinned at the 12 o'clock position), riders who use extra-wide pedals and/or pedal extensions should remain extra cautious.
  • Seat comfort – Meh. Atop the stock seat, my hindquarters don't seem to mind 3-5 mile rides too much, exhibiting only minor numbness or soreness the following day. But after a 10+ mile excursion, my entire undercarriage aches in ways it's not supposed to. Hence I intend to swap the seat out for an even plusher, beefier model by Selle, which includes more substantial rails that may better withstand shifting the seat fore or aft to suit my junk. The roads of New Orleans are unforgiving with their innumerable potholes and bike lane irregularities; combined with a stiff frame and heavy rider, this is the perfect storm for posterior pounding. I may also swap out the seat post for my Thudbuster.
  • Frame lock mounts – I would like to have seen Priority include a pair of braze-ons at the rear triangle specifically for the addition of a café (a/k/a metro) lock, rather than relegate such security to aftermarket "strap-on" devices. Heck, if I had my druthers, a frame lock would have been included, and honestly should be at this price point.
  • Gates Carbon Drive belt – Seems they have begun outfitting the Current with the slightly more reliable "CDX" model (with its telltale ribbed surface) rather than the "CDN" (smooth outer surface) belt. That's a nice little upgrade, something not yet reflected in company literature. I haven't yet checked the belt's tension using the Gates mobile app, but the suggested readings are mentioned both in the included paper manual as well as within the free CarbonDrive app.
  • Wish list items – Beyond that, would I like to have seen a rack as standard equipment? Yes. A suspension fork? Maybe (though probably not, as I understand that a suspension stem accomplishes much of the same effect for far less cost and weight). Beefier seat rails? Perhaps (as a Clydesdale rider, I tend to break regular gauge ones within a year). Mirror? Yes (although admittedly no single style suits all riders). Narrower handlebar? Open for debate.
  • Charger noise – Incredibly (and annoyingly), the constant fan noise coming from the included battery charger while plugged in is substantially louder than that of the bike's motor. I can easily hear it from two rooms away, and I'm not known for my excellent hearing. Makes me wish had electricity in the bike shed, so I could charge the battery there instead.
PRO TIPS
  • Tires – Be sure to inflate yours to the maximum PSI stamped on the sidewall, which in the case of the Goodyear Transit Tour 650b tires that come with my 2022 Current, is 70 PSI (I went with 60 PSI). Initially, my front was only at 25 PSI while the rear was at 40 PSI. I'm sure this is another "safety while shipping" precaution taken at the factory warehouse.
  • Password – Take the time to set a 4-digit password on the controller (under PARAMETERS), so that nobody can casually hop on your bike and ride it away under power. Easier than carrying a key!
  • Lock(s) – I found a couple of Abus Bordo Combo 6100 folding locks (resettable 4-digit combination with no need for a key) in "Open Box" condition on eBay, and highly recommend these as a sensible balance between cost, security, form and function. They are hefty yet fold compactly and fit the Current's frame (at least the L) in several convenient places. I plan to use one through the rear triangle and one to secure the front wheel separately, for 2x+ the peace of mind.
  • Rack – Went with another Current owner's suggestion of the Topeak MTX rear rack system, combining their Explorer rack with the matched DXP trunk bag, which is ridiculously capacious and expandable. I don't plan to leave the bag on the bike in my absence, so the slide-to-mount-plus-clip system makes total sense, along with the bag's inherent water resistance. For heavy rain, I'll deploy a garbage back over the whole rack system, though Topeak does offer a dedicated rain cover for $20-30 online.
I should have read this before ridding my Current with almost no air in the tires. Jeez. Anyway, did you get a mirror for your bike? I really need one I discovered since I can't easily turn my head to look back. Also I am curious as to how you mount more than one folding lock onto your frame. My 'foldy lock' only fits in one place and I used the other for a bottle holder.
 

etiej

Member
Region
USA
OMG 1000x yes. So much packaging, it took me another 2-3 days to clear it all out via the Recycling and Trash bins out front. :)
I even managed to create a whole other cardboard box, to ship out an eBay item, by cutting large squares out of the sides of the outer container. Saved all the zip ties, though! (Pro tip: You can always "back out" a zip tie by inserting a very small, thin blade into the catch, then back out the tongue intact and reuse.)
Great idea re the zip ties, except that I bought a million pack at Costco years ago. I will never use all of them.
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
I should have read this before ridding my Current with almost no air in the tires. Jeez. Anyway, did you get a mirror for your bike? I really need one I discovered since I can't easily turn my head to look back. Also I am curious as to how you mount more than one folding lock onto your frame. My 'foldy lock' only fits in one place and I used the other for a bottle holder.
Yes, I've always loved the Mirrycle mirror, so I bought and installed one of those on my left handlebar grip. Really can save my bacon on a busy road with passing traffic. I actually think drivers act "better" (drive less agressively) when they see I'm looking at them in my mirrors. (My 2nd mirror is a small clip-on style worn on the left temple of my eyeglasses; perfect for swiveling around and seeing what's behind me. This way, I can even "cheat" and keep an eye on a traffic light about to change, thus beating everyone off the starting line.)

To answer your question about two locks, I actually wound up only mounting one foldy lock to my seat tube (screws and Velcro, why not), and used the other bosses for a water bottle cage, as you rightly suggest above. I may start taking a double-ended cable with me to extend the "reach" of my foldy lock, since it's VERY limited.
 

etiej

Member
Region
USA
Yes, I've always loved the Mirrycle mirror, so I bought and installed one of those on my left handlebar grip. Really can save my bacon on a busy road with passing traffic. I actually think drivers act "better" (drive less agressively) when they see I'm looking at them in my mirrors. (My 2nd mirror is a small clip-on style worn on the left temple of my eyeglasses; perfect for swiveling around and seeing what's behind me. This way, I can even "cheat" and keep an eye on a traffic light about to change, thus beating everyone off the starting line.)

To answer your question about two locks, I actually wound up only mounting one foldy lock to my seat tube (screws and Velcro, why not), and used the other bosses for a water bottle cage, as you rightly suggest above. I may start taking a double-ended cable with me to extend the "reach" of my foldy lock, since it's VERY limited.
This mirror actually fits on top of, or around, the grip?
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
This mirror actually fits on top of, or around, the grip?
You have to cut a small hole through the end of the handgrip, then insert the two-part wedge mechanism of the Mirrycle into the opening and tighten it in place. Its ingenious design lets you angle and tilt the mirror very precisely and, if you tighten the allen bolts just so, it stays in place while still allowing you to manually tilt it (or be pushed out of the way by passing brush, etc.) without much effort.
 

etiej

Member
Region
USA
Cut small holes ... my mechanical abilities are limited to turning the occasional screw. What did you cut holes with?
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
Cut small holes ... my mechanical abilities are limited to turning the occasional screw. What did you cut holes with?
I should have been more specific, sorry. The cutting is done into the fairly hard rubber outer end of the grip, which necessitates using either a utility knife or spade bit on a drill or something like that which can help you trace out a hole. The hole diameter need not match that of the handlebar ends; it can actually be a little smaller so long as the wedge components of the mirror slide into it.
Take a look at the item listing on Amazon and see for yourself how the parts go together.
 

Muso

New Member
Region
USA
City
Hollywood
I had a fairly easy time assembling mine - A friend and the extra pair of hands that came along with him helped a lot! My cats helped out by crawling into the empty box and promptly going to sleep.

I'm getting a bit better range, but I'm not quite a Clydesdale rider - I'm probably more of an Ardennes lol. I have to say, I do love the power. Even with the lesser gear range of the Shimano hub, I can get up the hills. And yeah, with the power off, it's quiet as a tomb.

As for the mirror, this one just plugs into the bar end - pull the cap out of the bar, and stick the mirror in. There may be better ones, but this one does the job well enough.

-James-
 

kam619

New Member
Region
USA
I’ve had my Current for about 3 months now, and have about 700 miles on it. My experience has been similar to a lot of TimGNO’s except for motor noise. Mine has a constant high pitch motor whine regardless of assist level or gear. The pitch will change, but it’s loud enough that walkers ahead of me on bike paths will move out of the way! Priority customer service said this is normal.

In spite of the motor noise, I really like the bike. It’s a comfortable ride, good on hills, and the belt drive and Shimano shifter are nice. I ride probably 75% of the time in level one, but do live in a hilly area, so am often in 2-5. My range is about 40 miles.
 

TimGNO

Member
Region
USA
The pitch will change, but it’s loud enough that walkers ahead of me on bike paths will move out of the way! Priority customer service said this is normal.
No doubt it is normal, so I'm glad you mentioned it. Full disclosure: I am largely deaf in the high-frequency sound range, so would never notice the noise myself. 🙃