R.I.P. CrossRip+

e-boy

Well-Known Member
I'd like to see Trek bring back and update the discontinued CrossRip+ .
Maybe even offer a flat bar version .
As far as I know they do not currently offer (USA) a class 3 , 700c , flat bar commuter .

 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
I'd like to see Trek bring back and update the discontinued CrossRip+ .
Maybe even offer a flat bar version .
As far as I know they do not currently offer (USA) a class 3 , 700c , flat bar commuter .

Domane + is superior to cross rip and I believe it can take wider tires in case you want to ride it on gravel. It is a very nice offering.

On the other hand I agree that they don't have a light, fun to ride without assist flat bar model. The ones they have all have 27.5x2.4 which is more like a hybrid mtb tire and not much fun/efficient to ride without assist.
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
Trek says Domane + is designed for roadies .
CrossRIP + was designed for commuters .
As long as you can put on a rack and fenders you are fine. Crossrip was nothing special, just a drop bar bike with rack/fenders.

There are quite a few people who commute with their domane+ hp on the forums.
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
Nice bike ! , but I still think it's designed for roadies vs. commuters .
For one , Look at the chainstay length , 42 vs 47 .
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
Both Giant and Specialized now offer a Class 3 700c commuter .
I'm sure Trek will soon offer one too .
 
Yeah, the regular CrossRip was developed as a commuter-oriented cyclocross bike. Basically Trek's concession to the continued existence of the Surly Cross Check. The guy does refer to the CrossRip+ as having an "endurance road fit." But it has "cross" in the name, it's a cx bike for commuters. If the CrossRip+ still existed, I would have considered it.

On the other hand, the Domane/Domane+ are endurance road bikes. You can commute on them, but it doesn't work as well. That shorter chainstay can lead to heel striking your pannier bags, for example. Not to mention the Domane+ is super expensive!
 

Chancelucky2

Active Member
I have a CrossRip+ which I bought used from another member here who moved on to a Turbo Creo SL. I've had a great time with it (1800 miles 6 months), because it's so flexible. I've used it as a road bike, a grocery getter, as a gravel bike, etc. Oddly, I mostly got it because I wanted to do multi-day tours, but due to COVID, that's the one thing I haven't done on it. My take is that Trek put a lot of thought into the design and execution. For instance, it has drop bars, but it's set up in such a way that you can ride the brake hoods, something that's reasonably close to flat bar position, and still use the brakes wihtout having to move your hands. Basically, it's a really good bike that simply didn't sell well. I suspect that only offering it in black didn't help. I also think that marketing the thing as a long distance commuter meant it was competing with Trek's own Alliants. Knobbier tires and they could have easily promoted the Crossrip+ as an E-gravel bike. My take is that Trek had the Alliants with the Bosch Gen4 motors and internal battery and the Domane as an e-road bike, so the Crossrip+ wound up as the odd model out, because it was right in between the two and I suspect had lower profit margins. I do think the e-road bike trend has been to bikes that trade off weight for less power and smaller batteries. It makes sense on the road, especially for group rides where e-bikes are analogous to Viagra (it's more fun when you can hide the fact that you need it). I'm not as sure that it makes sense for gravel, for loaded touring, or roads like the Blue Ridge parkway (mostly hills). On those occasions, I'm glad I have a 500 wh battery and 60+ Newton Meters of Torque. Bottom line, at least for me, it's part of what makes it so versatile. In the meantime, you might find a pretty similar mix of attributes with the Yamaha Civante.
 
I have a CrossRip+ which I bought used from another member here who moved on to a Turbo Creo SL. I've had a great time with it (1800 miles 6 months), because it's so flexible. I've used it as a road bike, a grocery getter, as a gravel bike, etc. Oddly, I mostly got it because I wanted to do multi-day tours, but due to COVID, that's the one thing I haven't done on it. My take is that Trek put a lot of thought into the design and execution. For instance, it has drop bars, but it's set up in such a way that you can ride the brake hoods, something that's reasonably close to flat bar position, and still use the brakes wihtout having to move your hands. Basically, it's a really good bike that simply didn't sell well. I suspect that only offering it in black didn't help. I also think that marketing the thing as a long distance commuter meant it was competing with Trek's own Alliants. Knobbier tires and they could have easily promoted the Crossrip+ as an E-gravel bike. My take is that Trek had the Alliants with the Bosch Gen4 motors and internal battery and the Domane as an e-road bike, so the Crossrip+ wound up as the odd model out, because it was right in between the two and I suspect had lower profit margins. I do think the e-road bike trend has been to bikes that trade off weight for less power and smaller batteries. It makes sense on the road, especially for group rides where e-bikes are analogous to Viagra (it's more fun when you can hide the fact that you need it). I'm not as sure that it makes sense for gravel, for loaded touring, or roads like the Blue Ridge parkway (mostly hills). On those occasions, I'm glad I have a 500 wh battery and 60+ Newton Meters of Torque. Bottom line, at least for me, it's part of what makes it so versatile. In the meantime, you might find a pretty similar mix of attributes with the Yamaha Civante.

Interesting you should mention the Civante, that's exactly what I bought! But I also agree that Trek needs an e-gravel bike. Somehow the only gravel-specific bike they have is the Checkpoint, which replaced the CrossRip. The rest of their gravel lineup are cx and endurance road bikes; that would have been perfectly fine before GRX, but not any more. Perhaps a Checkpoint+ is in the works.
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
According to Trek chat support they are not aware of any plans for a 700c class 3 commuter this year .