R&M Charger3, corrosio frame possible ?

pnowak2

Member
HI,

I got new Charger3 2020 model and it has some bumps on the frame, straight to the metal.
Do you think to places should be fixed by painting cause corrosion can eat it, or its made of aluminium or other alloys which are corrosion resistant ?
 

percymon

Active Member
Are these bumps from transit damage ? If so, i'd be raising with the supplier; even if the package looked fine on delivery you cannot check the internal parts until after any courier has left.
 

pnowak2

Member
sure
 

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pnowak2

Member
it has been done by seller, i got finally deal with them, got great discount etc + they offered repair in form of sanding, painting and putting a protective sticker on it, but not sure if i really should do it, as it makes the frame look weird..

just wondering if such damage can be bad for the frame in future..
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Aluminium alloys are corrosion resistant. Don't worry. (Aluminium reacts with oxygen immediately, forming a hard layer of resistant Al2O3. Only never treat your e-bike with bases, like, er, Domestos) :)
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
All modern bike frames are made either of aluminium alloys or carbon fibre, or (rarely) titanium. I am sure your bike's frame is made of aluminium alloy. Nobody makes modern e-bikes of steel anymore.
1605277378314.png
 

pnowak2

Member
ok so no corrosion, i dont care that scratch is there, there will be more.
that concludes the topic, i will not ask them to make painting and protective sticker.

thx a lot!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Kona still makes steel frame bikes
Not for e-bikes. 6061 aluminium is used for Kona e-bikes.

Surly makes no e-bikes.
Tout Terrain appear to take their non-electric bikes and convert them with Direct Drive motor, Gates belt and Pinion gearbox. Sorry to say it but Riese & Muller belong to another world: e-bike world.
 
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Not for e-bikes. 6061 aluminium is used for Kona e-bikes.

Surly makes no e-bikes.
Tout Terrain appear to take their non-electric bikes and convert them with Direct Drive motor, Gates belt and Pinion gearbox. Sorry to say it but Riese & Muller belong to another world: e-bike world.
Yes you’re correct , just see that you said ebikes
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I would rather expect you Richard confirming R&M frames were made of hydroformed aluminium :)
I can't confirm hydroformed frames one way or the other, not having personally examined each model. All the frames I have seen have consistently shaped tubes, with no flares or compound curves and plates welded together with very high quality, durable welding jobs. I've not seen better welding on any other bike. Some have complained that their welds still show the layered beads of weld rather than being ground down to make the smooth and pretty. That looks nice but it weakens the welds. In my mind R&M made the proper choice on this. I have never heard of a break on a R&M frame.

Their paint is another story. My observation and that of others is that they use soft paints without a harder protective clear coat...very easily scratched and damaged. I have made repeated requests for touch up paint or at least color formulas to get paint custom mixed locally. However we are talking aesthetics here. No functional issues with frame strength or durability.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I only meant R&M e-bikes were made of aluminum (not of steel) because the only question from the OP was whether the Charger3 frame could corrode... :)
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I only meant R&M e-bikes were made of aluminum (not of steel) because the only question from the OP was whether the Charger3 frame could corrode... :)
Yes Riese & Muller frames are all made of aluminum. I don't know which specific alloys are used as that is something rarely if ever revealed in any product literature.

There are many different alloys of aluminum that are used for different purposes. Some alloys are specifically designed for enhanced strength, others for corrosion resistance. These are used more often in marine applications.

Aluminum has an excellent strength to weight ratio so even though to match the strength of steel it must be much thicker, it still weighs much less. Often products made to sell at bargain prices will skimp on the thickness of the aluminum used to trim costs. These products look the same but over time their inherent weakness will be revealed. Also use of the wrong alloys can results in weaker construction. Aluminum is brittle so it is subject to metal fatigue and does not flex or absorb vibrational energy. Again there are alloys of aluminum that in part correct these properties.

Aluminum is very difficult to keep properly finished. It oxidizes very quickly and those oxidized surfaces will not hold finishes for very long. It must first be sanded to bare shiny newly exposed metal and then immediately an acid etch must be applied to halt oxidation. Then are barrier coats of primer are applied. If there is any pitting in the metal surface then a filler coat applied, then coats of finish primer and finally top coats. Proper sanding must be done between each coat.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Once you have a scratch down to metal in aluminum, it becomes and entry point for corrosion and the size of the exposed area will grow over time. Frankly, if you have little experience with preparation, sanding and application of primers and paint, you should take up the shop's offer of having the paint repaired professionally. Insist that it be done properly, best done by an auto repair shop. This is a brand new, very expensive bike. It should be delivered in perfect condition and I personally would accept nothing less.

Yes you will put scratches on it and you should look after them. But it should not be delivered to you new with a scratch. When you do scratch it yourself, go to an auto parts store and buy a the closest color touch up paint . Use a little piece of 320 grit sandpaper folded in half to just carefully sand inside the scratch and not on adjacent paint. Then brush on some white vinegar to acid etch the metal. Shake up the touch up paint and carefully fill the crack Let it dry one day and then apply a second coat.