R&M Charger3, corrosio frame possible ?

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
So finally would you recommend painting my scratch or it’s safe to leave it like it is ? I don’t cate d’or aesthetic side of it
It is safe.
The oxide layer that forms on aluminium offers high resistance to corrosion, and this is where I -- as a chemical engineer -- cannot agree with you Alaskan. The layer is as thin as 1 nanometre! (Have any of you ever seen a rusty aluminum kitchen vessel?) Aluminum can only be destroyed by strong bases such as sodium hydroxide.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It is safe.
The oxide layer that forms on aluminium offers high resistance to corrosion, and this is where I -- as a chemical engineer -- cannot agree with you Alaskan. The layer is as thin as 1 nanometre! (Have any of you ever seen a rusty aluminum kitchen vessel?) Aluminum can only be destroyed by strong bases such as sodium hydroxide.
My point was that the exposure will spread to destroy more and more of the finish, not that it makes the item any weaker. Any possible place where moisture can enter will weaken the paint edge, eventually delaminating the surface and growing the blemish.

Many commercial fishing boats made of aluminum are left unpainted. Once the surface oxidizes to a dull gray, it is totally stable. This reduces cosmetic maintenance and does not compromise integrity. It is just rather ugly is all.
 
Last edited:

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the answer. Maybe I should take the sellers offer and let them paint it professionally
That would be my recommendation, absolutely. As long as they have offered to do the right thing, best to take them up on it. You will be without the bike for a few days but it will be worth it in the long run. And do find a close matching touch up paint and sand paper for dealing with the inevitable scratches and dings you will be putting on the bike as you use it. Depending on the color, fingernail polish can be used as well. A couple of layers and then a clear overcoat will keep you bike looking like new.
 

pnowak2

Member
what the dealer proposed is to sand it, paint professionaly and putting a sticker to cover the scratch in addition.
on top of that they proposed to install the abus chain holder so overall the sticker/patch will not be visible.
maybe its not that bad idea at all to make them do it, of course dealer pays for it.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
what the dealer proposed is to sand it, paint professionaly and putting a sticker to cover the scratch in addition.
on top of that they proposed to install the abus chain holder so overall the sticker/patch will not be visible.
maybe its not that bad idea at all to make them do it, of course dealer pays for it.
That sounds like a high integrity solution from a high integrity dealer...most generous. I would be thrilled with that resolution to the issue were I in your situation.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Stefan, my boat has an all aluminum house and superstructure, from the deck up. It is painted with a two part linear polyurethane paint. Sanding down, patching and fairing in repair paint is an annual chore that takes days. It looks great but only at the expense of great labor.

P1010124.JPG
 

pnowak2

Member
They have also offered 25% rebate for the bike, I’m good with them, the only thing for me was whether to accept their proposal of painting or not
 
Last edited:

JVBulman

Active Member
Region
USA
Not for e-bikes. 6061 aluminium is used for Kona e-bikes.

Surly makes no e-bikes.
Tout Terrain appear to take their non-electric bikes and convert them with Direct Drive motor, Gates belt and Pinion gearbox. Sorry to say it but Riese & Muller belong to another world: e-bike world.
Surly makes the Big Easy - a steel, Bosch-powered longtail. Benno makes the RemiDemi. Xtracycle has an entire line of Bosch-powered cargo bikes made of steel. There are many companies who make great Bosch eBikes out of steel, making this strange choice of hill for you to die on, friend-o.
 
Last edited:

webcurl

Well-Known Member
It is safe.
The oxide layer that forms on aluminium offers high resistance to corrosion, and this is where I -- as a chemical engineer -- cannot agree with you Alaskan. The layer is as thin as 1 nanometre! (Have any of you ever seen a rusty aluminum kitchen vessel?) Aluminum can only be destroyed by strong bases such as sodium hydroxide.
I'm a 3 minute walk from the beach here in Australia (heat & sea air) and several of my Aluminum window frames need replacing soon as they are majorly pitted. I'm paranoid about the scratches on my badly painted R&M!
I'll be getting a magnifying glass to them soon when i overhaul the SC1
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Pitting is one thing (a larger area of unpainted frame exposed to the elements could experience that) but generally aluminium doesn't rust. It is the main reason modern bike frames are mostly made from that metal I guess. Because you need to use as much as three times of aluminium more to make the frame as stiff as the steel one. Which effectively cancels the weight benefit.

There's nothing perfect in this vale of tears. Go for carbon fibre to eliminate corrosion and it will crack sooner or later :) No warranty on CF frames while many manufacturers give a life-time warranty on Al frames...
 

webcurl

Well-Known Member
Pitted with large holes and white aluminum debris falling down, essentially rusting/corroding. We had some stoby poles (overhead power poles) fall down here in high winds a few years back and the insides of the Aluminium Earth cables were just a white mushy mixture inside the plastic insulated encasing.