R&M Roadster touring 2021

b.amelie

New Member
Region
Canada
City
BC
I've been searching these forums and Reddit but haven't found much recent feedback on the Roadster model. A Riese & Muller bike is pushing my budget (so far I've been looking at Trek Allant 7+, Bulls Cross Lite Evo, and Ohm Quest) but I like that the Roadster can be customized and it seems lightweight compared to many ebikes. On paper it looks great and I'm hoping to try one out this week. Does anyone have any input on this bike? Personal experience?

Also, is the suspension fork air or coil? I can't find that info anywhere which makes me think it must be coil... I'm hoping not.

What have been your experience with R&M bikes in general? Do they live up to their price tag in quality and longevity? How is their support after purchase?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have a Trek Allant 9.9 and my wife rides a Riese & Muller Homage (that I have ridden quite a bit). They are both great bikes but my opinion is that the Trek offers better value for the money. I am not sure about the fork but all the R&M bikes I know that have a front fork use a lower grade Suntour air fork that is adequate and clearly more comfortable that rigid fixed forks.

Not sure about Canada but in the US, Trek has a much broader distribution of shops that will service your bike after the purchase. Trek is a far more customer oriented company and really stands behind their products better than most. Riese & Muller has no parts distribution in North America so getting replacement parts from them can take far longer as they have to come from Germany. Unless you have a local dealer nearby, you could find yourself having to tranport a bike in need of service a long distance and waiting weeks or longer for repairs. All that said R&M bikes are well designed, well equipped, and generally quite reliable. I would say the brands are of comparable quality but the local service factor favors Trek.
 

dblhelix

Well-Known Member
I've been searching these forums and Reddit but haven't found much recent feedback on the Roadster model. A Riese & Muller bike is pushing my budget (so far I've been looking at Trek Allant 7+, Bulls Cross Lite Evo, and Ohm Quest) but I like that the Roadster can be customized and it seems lightweight compared to many ebikes. On paper it looks great and I'm hoping to try one out this week. Does anyone have any input on this bike? Personal experience?

Also, is the suspension fork air or coil? I can't find that info anywhere which makes me think it must be coil... I'm hoping not.

What have been your experience with R&M bikes in general? Do they live up to their price tag in quality and longevity? How is their support after purchase?

As you probably know, the current spec on this model lists the fork as “Suntour NCX 28”, tapered.” There are multiple NCX models. The D-LO appears to be steel spring (certainly true for older models) and the NCX-E is air. Both claim 63mm travel. I would ask R&M directly for the specific ID. It’s a budget fork, regardless.

I would agree with all of @Alaskan’s remarks about parts/service. If your configuration is derailleur/chain, you’ll have less to worry about, of course.
 

TheRaja

New Member
Region
USA
FWIW: At approx 6:15 mark of this video review of the R&M Roadster 2021
Chris of Propel states that the front suspension fork is a coil spring type.

b.amelie: We must share similar tastes/needs in ebikes. I have not purchased or taken a test ride yet, but have spent a lot of online time researching ebikes, much of it on this forum. I also narrowed my choices down to Trek Allant+ 7, R&M Roadster 2021, and 2021 Bulls CrossLight Evo Diamond . Allant+7 doesn't quite tick all my boxes, but the Bulls pretty much does other than minor items such as bike color, rear rack wouldn't be my first choice, and not too thrilled with front light positioning. But the nearest Bulls dealer to me is 2 hours away, and R & M much further than that. So for my first ebike purchase I am concurring with the sentiments of Alaskan and dblhelix expressed above and will patiently wait with fingers crossed that Trek refreshes their ebike line later this year and offers something a bit closer to my desires than the Allant 7+. I have a couple choices of Trek dealers in my area, and am currently riding an accoustic 2019 Trek Dual Sport 3 hybrid and have been generally pleased with it and had no problems.
 

rickbollocks

New Member
Region
USA
I've been searching these forums and Reddit but haven't found much recent feedback on the Roadster model. A Riese & Muller bike is pushing my budget (so far I've been looking at Trek Allant 7+, Bulls Cross Lite Evo, and Ohm Quest) but I like that the Roadster can be customized and it seems lightweight compared to many ebikes. On paper it looks great and I'm hoping to try one out this week. Does anyone have any input on this bike? Personal experience?

Also, is the suspension fork air or coil? I can't find that info anywhere which makes me think it must be coil... I'm hoping not.

What have been your experience with R&M bikes in general? Do they live up to their price tag in quality and longevity? How is their support after purchase?
Hi, I own a 2020 R
I've been searching these forums and Reddit but haven't found much recent feedback on the Roadster model. A Riese & Muller bike is pushing my budget (so far I've been looking at Trek Allant 7+, Bulls Cross Lite Evo, and Ohm Quest) but I like that the Roadster can be customized and it seems lightweight compared to many ebikes. On paper it looks great and I'm hoping to try one out this week. Does anyone have any input on this bike? Personal experience?

Also, is the suspension fork air or coil? I can't find that info anywhere which makes me think it must be coil... I'm hoping not.

What have been your experience with R&M bikes in general? Do they live up to their price tag in quality and longevity? How is their support after purchase?
Hi, I own a 2020 R & M Roadster Touring HS. This is one of the best bikes I have ever owned. Sporty, fast, perfect weight that gives you stability but not too heavy to be cumbersome. It is air suspension. I added a suspension seat post and the ride is very compliant even over potholes (I live in New England and there are many!) It is a fast Level 3 bike, you can keep up with traffic averaging 24 - 28pmh on the flat and it handles great around corners. The build quality is excellent and I have had zero issues after around 700 miles. Just an awesome bike, I suspect the 2021 model is even better with a 650W engine, may have to upgrade :) Let me know if you would like any further info.
 

niveksilliw

New Member
Hi, I own a 2020 R

Hi, I own a 2020 R & M Roadster Touring HS. This is one of the best bikes I have ever owned. Sporty, fast, perfect weight that gives you stability but not too heavy to be cumbersome. It is air suspension. I added a suspension seat post and the ride is very compliant even over potholes (I live in New England and there are many!) It is a fast Level 3 bike, you can keep up with traffic averaging 24 - 28pmh on the flat and it handles great around corners. The build quality is excellent and I have had zero issues after around 700 miles. Just an awesome bike, I suspect the 2021 model is even better with a 650W engine, may have to upgrade :) Let me know if you would like any further info.
I currently own a Tinker HS and have owned it for three years. But I always loved the Roadster and was waiting for an integrated battery. The 650 watt battery seems to be a nice size to provide for an extended range without the weight of an additional battery. We are lucky in the Chicagoland area because a few dealers that sell R & M bikes have popped in the last few years. Right now I’m trying to decide if I want the tried and true deraileur versus the belt-drive option. Any thoughts?
 

rickbollocks

New Member
Region
USA
I currently own a Tinker HS and have owned it for three years. But I always loved the Roadster and was waiting for an integrated battery. The 650 watt battery seems to be a nice size to provide for an extended range without the weight of an additional battery. We are lucky in the Chicagoland area because a few dealers that sell R & M bikes have popped in the last few years. Right now I’m trying to decide if I want the tried and true deraileur versus the belt-drive option. Any thoughts?
Hi, I am not that familiar with the Tinker. It's funny, but I own many bikes, most none electric, but I keep coming back to the Roadster. I don't mind the external battery, and I also have a spare battery. I added a wood frame in a pannier that keeps it rock solid on my rear rack, and I don't notice the weight increase. This can give me up to 100 miles range.

I just did a fast 40-mile hilly ride this weekend, and it was awesome. I was exhausted at the end because I rode it to its maximum, burnt 2200 calories, and had almost zero battery at the finish. I can do way over 50 miles on one battery if needed with mostly Eco and Tour. I get a bit tired of people saying e-bikes are for lazy riders. Any riding is good, but you can get as much or less of a workout on an e-bike as a regular bike; it's simply down to your own goals and motivation for that day.

Regarding the derailleur or belt, I think there is a lot of marketing hype around the belt drive. I am not sure if the power / efficiency performance is as good as a chain yet, you could google that. I don't think the Tour de France riders are using belts yet. It's like electric cars, we will be all driving them one day, but does it need to be today? I have the original chain and have now done around 1000 miles, with zero issues. I do have a replacement which I will put on soon.
 

RMK!

Well-Known Member
I believe the issue isn't chain vs belt as much as IGH vs a cassette derailleur drive train. In that regard the choice should be based upon your own research and where/how you ride. IMO, the IGH is a better option for everything except single track mountain biking. I have 2300 multiuse miles on a 2019 RM Delite GX Rohloff e14 (chain model) equipped bike and the gear range, smooth fast shifting and quiet operation are simply amazing. I know some owners have had issues with the Rohloff which I believe are primarily oil leaking due to temperature differentials causing rubber seal expansion/contraction which is the root cause.. I haven't encountered this issue but then I live in a mild climate. I'd like to think it is more than me just being lucky.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I did belts, Enviolo and Rohloff on various R&M bikes. The one I rode the most and still have is a 2018 Delite Mountain with dual batteries and an old school derailleur.

I had problems with the other setups, especially waiting for parts, which I am sure, what with the current global supply chain disruptions, is even worse. My 2019 Homage Rohloff HS developed a serious oil leak, far beyond the usual pressure equalization Rohloff insisted was happening. My bike sat in the shop awaiting warranty replacement of simple seals for over three months during its first year of service before it was finally fixed...after many phone calls and much fuss.

Being able to get what you need and find a mechanic that can help you fix it, should you be far afield is invaluable. A really fine bike with the latest drive train tech is cool to own and operate, but not nearly so much if it becomes disabled for three months in its first year with few service options and sketchy parts supply. Then that fine bike becomes just a pile of metal plastic, rubber and frustration...much easier to avoid with more common, time tested and proven components.
 

JVBulman

Active Member
Region
USA
@Alaskan put it nicely - Low-maintenance™ alternatives to traditional derailleur drivetrains work great until they don't; at which point it can be an even bigger headache to get them running again.
 

JimAndArrow

Member
Region
USA
City
SoCal
I don’t have my R&M E-14/Gates setup yet so I cannot speak to that, but I have two Rohloff bikes and also two Schlumpf drives (one bike with both), with 20k+ miles over the last 14 years, and I greatly, greatly prefer them to my derailleur setups - and while an anecdote is just that, I personally have found them more reliable than my derailleur bikes, not less. They might be more difficult to get running if something breaks in theory, but I’ve also never had one place me on the side of a trail having thrown or broken the chain, both of which have happened to me on different derailleur bikes.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I don’t have my R&M E-14/Gates setup yet so I cannot speak to that, but I have two Rohloff bikes and also two Schlumpf drives (one bike with both), with 20k+ miles over the last 14 years, and I greatly, greatly prefer them to my derailleur setups - and while an anecdote is just that, I personally have found them more reliable than my derailleur bikes, not less. They might be more difficult to get running if something breaks in theory, but I’ve also never had one place me on the side of a trail having thrown or broken the chain, both of which have happened to me on different derailleur bikes.
My two E-14 with gates bikes were a dream to ride but one, as I said, turned into a nightmare to get repaired. Anyone dismissing this as an "anecdote" and not a factor worth considering is asking for the fickle finger of fate to work its mischief.

When I travel far afield, up into the hills or on a long tour, I always carry both a few quick links and a spare chain. I can easily replace a broken chain in under 5 minutes. It takes a bit longer and a few more tools to change out a Gates belt. . There have been numerous accounts here and on the Riese & Muller FB page of people whose Gates belt has parted mid-ride. No quick link will fix that and your chances of finding the right belt at a nearby bike shop are slim or none. I highly recommended buying a spare belt and keeping it in the trunk bag on your bike. Do not over bend or fold that spare belt to fit in a small bag or you will ruin it.
 

JVBulman

Active Member
Region
USA
I don’t have my R&M E-14/Gates setup yet so I cannot speak to that, but I have two Rohloff bikes and also two Schlumpf drives (one bike with both), with 20k+ miles over the last 14 years, and I greatly, greatly prefer them to my derailleur setups - and while an anecdote is just that, I personally have found them more reliable than my derailleur bikes, not less. They might be more difficult to get running if something breaks in theory, but I’ve also never had one place me on the side of a trail having thrown or broken the chain, both of which have happened to me on different derailleur bikes.
Right on! I'm installing my first personal Rohloff on my daily commuter next month.

I've found over the years the problems specific to R&Ms are less often with the Rohloff itself and more to do with the combination of the high tension of the belt unthreading the DU/Rohloff lockrings and various E14 parts failures (most often the DC/DC converter or the Shift unit at the hub)