Rad City top speed after adjustment?

Brock

New Member
I have had the Rad City for about a year now and it has been great. I did the top speed adjustment about a month after I had it and that was great. The thing I wonder is often when I am riding now I will be at the 750 watts to get up to speed but as I pass 20 mph the wattage tapers off. Am I correct that at about 25 mph there just isn't enough voltage in the pack to push the motor any faster? Or is this a limitation of the stock controller? I am regularly riding about 24-25 mph and 100 or less watts in PAS 5.
 

CynicalZombie

New Member
Correct, there isn't enough voltage in the stock 48V battery to get you going much faster... the way the stock controller works is that once you are past the limit on speed, 20-24 MPH, the motor won't assist anymore until you get back below the limit.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I have had the Rad City for about a year now and it has been great. I did the top speed adjustment about a month after I had it and that was great. The thing I wonder is often when I am riding now I will be at the 750 watts to get up to speed but as I pass 20 mph the wattage tapers off. Am I correct that at about 25 mph there just isn't enough voltage in the pack to push the motor any faster? Or is this a limitation of the stock controller? I am regularly riding about 24-25 mph and 100 or less watts in PAS 5.
Consider that one of the reasons Mr. Bolton's kit is so popular is that the speed restriction is no longer in place, unless you want one.

That fact tells me there is definitely a built in restriction in the OEM controller.

In PAS 5 with that kit installed, you could have 6 or 700 watts in play, or more with the throttle. You WILL have some say in the matter, depending on how you set it up.

I don't know how fast a 'City will go with Bolton's kit. Never tried. I would have a tendency to believe it would be about how fast you can peddle?
 

Brock

New Member
That is sort of what I was wonder, if the stock controller was limiting the top speed or voltage to the motor and if the Bolton controller would allow a higher voltage to the motor. From what I have seen and read the Bolton controller lets more wattage (amperage) through to the motor, but most people say the top speed is the same. If that is the case I am fine with the stock controller. Then maybe the option would be a 52v battery, but I am not sure it would be worth it cost wise for 2-4 mph top end increase, at least not until I need a new battery and at that point I will likely need a new bike as well :)
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
That is sort of what I was wonder, if the stock controller was limiting the top speed or voltage to the motor and if the Bolton controller would allow a higher voltage to the motor. From what I have seen and read the Bolton controller lets more wattage (amperage) through to the motor, but most people say the top speed is the same. If that is the case I am fine with the stock controller. Then maybe the option would be a 52v battery, but I am not sure it would be worth it cost wise for 2-4 mph top end increase, at least not until I need a new battery and at that point I will likely need a new bike as well :)
The battery casing is proprietary for Rad Power. :confused:
Bolton has 52V 20Ah battery for a little bit less price than the Rad Power 48V 14Ah.
I am not sure if it fits Rad City though.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Alternatively, I guess you can just get a battery pack and change the battery cradle.
I believe Rad Power has unique pattern for hole for screw, but drilling a hole on frame should be easy enough.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Doing the same thing here, waiting for my '17 OEM battery to screw up. We'll check our options then. If 52v is still king, we'll figure out just what the most effective way to go is at that point. Not going to get hung up on what's going on today.