Radrover Guidance for shorter riders...

Panama Vic

New Member
Hello all. I am 5’7” and per rad guidance in measurement instep 30.5. I do love the look of the radrover 5 vs th radrover step through. I’m looking to see some guidance from riders who are on the shorter side. How does it ride with the high step? Look forward to the discussion.
 

ExPatBrit

Active Member
Hello all. I am and per rad guidance in measurement instep 30.5. I do love the look of the radrover 5 vs th radrover step through. I’m looking to see some guidance from riders who are on the shorter side. How does it ride with the high step? Look forward to the discussion.

I have a rad-rover I am 5’8”, I have a spring post and a bigger seat which adds a few inches to the seat height.

If you are reasonably fit/ flexible it's no problem, to mount I tend to stand on one pedal push off and swing my other leg over once I am moving. Do the opposite when dismounting.

When stationary, I sometimes just slide off the saddle and stand astride the top frame. But I can just about reach the ground with one foot when seated.

I have a couple of older friends with step-thrus, they prefer the easier mount/ dismount.
 

Banzai

Active Member
Hello Panama Vic,
That's EXACTLY why they came up with the Step Thru model.
I tried to convince them that a miniature Rover with 24 inch wheels would make a lot of people happy and even increase sales.
But they finally came up with a better idea in 2020.
If a young whippersnapper of 50 or less, then don't worry about it. Agility will get you by.
I'm just under 6 feet tall and still have to deal with the height somewhat, mainly because the frame on my older RADRover 2 had not been adjusted yet for shorter riders. RAD made an ad showing how easy it was for riders of all heights to now ride the bike. I wish! Have to wonder how many people watching the ad realized the riders were all youngsters.
Unfortunately, if I don't have a cinder block or a berm to put my foot down on when coming to a stop, it's usually an UH OH! moment as I fall over.

But I'm a tough ol' hombre.

Happy Trails...


042718 Desert Schooner 2.jpg
 

Kyogiro

Member
I'm 5"6 on a good day and I would be considered youngish (35). I could understand stepping in and out would be an issue if there's a certain lack of agility. In that case, it would be wise to consider getting the step through instead.

As for stopping and staying on the bike, I do the same thing on all my bikes, I just move from my saddle and my inseam is just high enough for me to stay above the top tube and put my two feet on the ground. Again if there's an issue here, getting the step through would resolve this.

I never felt the bike to be too high, on the contrary since the handlebar is quite close to the body and it is very easy to maintain a straight stance. I never regard fitting the bike from the saddle to the ground standpoint but from the saddle to the pedals when they are in the lowest position, it's important that I can almost completely extend my leg.

Riding position (majority of the time) >>> stopping position (I can easily adjust for a couple of seconds).

My sister is 5"4 (and considerably younger than me, 23) and she could ride the Rhino (eu name for the rover). I thing she needs to lean to the bike when stopping, but it is fairly manageable, especially if one has previous cycling experience.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
am 5'6" and rode a regular rover for a couple of years, i would get the step thru
i handled it but it is a big heavy bike and just think it will be easier to handle in the step thru
 

BTfl

Active Member
am 5'6" and rode a regular rover for a couple of years, i would get the step thru
i handled it but it is a big heavy bike and just think it will be easier to handle in the step thru
I’m 5’5”, using stock seat post about 2 inches up, I am able to stay on the seat and put the ball of my foot on the ground no problem
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
You shouldn't have an issue with the standard Rad seat+seatpost. I added the Cloud-9 11.5X12.5 cruiser seat and Bodyfloat suspension seat (upgrade from the Suntour NCX SP-12. The suspension seatpost will raise the minimal seat height by around 2 1/2 - 3 inches. Depends on the upgraded seat if the new minimal seat height is added on top of that if you are think of doing both upgrades. My combo is about 4 - 4.5 inches taller with Cloud-9+Bodyfloat compared to Rad seat+post.
 

2wheelsturning

New Member
We've had our RadRover 5's for 2 months. My wife is 55 and 5'7, and hates getting on and off. It's been really tough for her; hip issues, etc. Consequently, I've ordered the RadRover Step-Thru 1 and waiting for it to arrive. Will be selling her RR 5 afterwards.
 
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Panama Vic

New Member
Thank you all for the various forms of guidance. It’s very hard to buy something sight unseen. I appreciate the posts and you all make some greats points all around. I am 41 no mobility issues so no problem and it looks like I have lots to consider.
 

Linternet1

New Member
Region
USA
You shouldn't have an issue with the standard Rad seat+seatpost. I added the Cloud-9 11.5X12.5 cruiser seat and Bodyfloat suspension seat (upgrade from the Suntour NCX SP-12. The suspension seatpost will raise the minimal seat height by around 2 1/2 - 3 inches. Depends on the upgraded seat if the new minimal seat height is added on top of that if you are think of doing both upgrades. My combo is about 4 - 4.5 inches taller with Cloud-9+Bodyfloat compared to Rad seat+post.
Hi.. I’m a 4’ 10”woman and saw your post about your wife of a similar size. Thinking of getting the Rad city step through. Will only ride on paved trails with no passenger. Leaning towards the Rad city but also the Rad runner has me a bit confused as to what would be best fit for me. Live on East coast so will have to buy sight unseen. Thank you.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
Hi.. I’m a 4’ 10”woman and saw your post about your wife of a similar size. Thinking of getting the Rad city step through. Will only ride on paved trails with no passenger. Leaning towards the Rad city but also the Rad runner has me a bit confused as to what would be best fit for me. Live on East coast so will have to buy sight unseen. Thank you.
If you have to deal with any hills I expect the runner would be the better choice.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
Hi.. I’m a 4’ 10”woman and saw your post about your wife of a similar size. Thinking of getting the Rad city step through. Will only ride on paved trails with no passenger. Leaning towards the Rad city but also the Rad runner has me a bit confused as to what would be best fit for me. Live on East coast so will have to buy sight unseen. Thank you.
Actually I meant the Rad runner plus. Sorry.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Look to see if there is a group eBike ride in your area. Talk to them and try a few bikes before you buy. Some are smooth. Some are nimble. Some surge and lurch. There are huge differences. Fit is just one significant factor.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
Hi.. I’m a 4’ 10”woman and saw your post about your wife of a similar size. Thinking of getting the Rad city step through. Will only ride on paved trails with no passenger. Leaning towards the Rad city but also the Rad runner has me a bit confused as to what would be best fit for me. Live on East coast so will have to buy sight unseen. Thank you.

We started out with two his/her 2016 Radrovers. She hated riding the Rovers because the fat tires made ebike seem larger and heavier than it was. Plus, the steering effort was a little different than with bikes with thinner tires. You sometimes turn the fat tire bike like a motorcycle and "lean to turn" instead of just using the handlebars (she didn't like riding like that). Low speed agility was difficult for her with the fat tires. All the advantages of having fat tires were lost on her because she was a paved road or improved double-wide dirt trails with speeds around 8-15 mph. I also couldn't add the thicker Cloud-9 seat or the Suntour NCX SP-12 or Bodyfloat suspension seatpost to the Rover because it would have made the seat height too high.

We were able to test ride the Rad City Step thru when on vacation in CA when they first came out. The Rad City came within a few pounds of her Radrover; but, it just felt like a smaller, lighter, more maneuverable, and more comfortable bike to ride for her size. She felt more confident and no issues doing the city tour of Newport Beach, CA. She liked the cruiser style handlebars with less of a reach for a more comfortable riding posture. I was also able to put the Cloud-9 seat and Bodyfloat suspension seatpost on her Radcity for a really smooth ride.


Picture of the wife's Radcity with C9 11.5X12.5 cruiser seat and Kinekt Bodyfloat v2 suspension seatpost set for her 4'11" height. The seat can still be lowered another 1 to 1 1/2 inches lower with the upgrades.
Rad City Seat.jpg
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I did a conversion of an Extra-Small 10-speed purple Specialized last week that is now 35 pounds and has no ugly wires. They are all thru-frame. It is a lithe and lovely bike. The Public C7-i is a great bike to make into a superior electric bike. The gears are internal and it is super comfy. I am converting the men's version today. It is the V7-i and a larger version of the Small British racing green bike shown. What is fun is these bikes out perform the $7400 bikes from stores and they do not look or feel like clunky electric bikes. Smooth. No thrilling surge and lurch associated with the heavy, online only, rear-drive bikes.
 

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Gordon71

Active Member
I did a conversion of an Extra-Small 10-speed purple Specialized last week that is now 35 pounds and has no ugly wires. They are all thru-frame. It is a lithe and lovely bike. The Public C7-i is a great bike to make into a superior electric bike. The gears are internal and it is super comfy. I am converting the men's version today. It is the V7-i and a larger version of the Small British racing green bike shown. What is fun is these bikes out perform the $7400 bikes from stores and they do not look or feel like clunky electric bikes. Smooth. No thrilling surge and lurch associated with the heavy, online only, rear-drive bikes.
Not sure what you mean by "surge and lurch" I've not experienced that with my Rad Rover.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Gordon71, In California we have some pedestrian bridges over freeways that have tight spiral ramps, making two and one-half rotations in a twelve-foot outer diameter, while going up about twenty-five feet. Electric bikes with thrilling surge and lurch crash on these bridges. E-Bikes that are smooth do not. We are doing a group ride tomorrow with a bunch of different bikes. That is the best way to experience and to celebrate the differences among bikes. My first eBike and second had surge and lurch but at the time I was happy because I didn't know the difference. When the fourth bike had this issue, I got rid of it fast.
 

ExPatBrit

Active Member
I did a conversion of an Extra-Small 10-speed purple Specialized last week that is now 35 pounds and has no ugly wires. They are all thru-frame. It is a lithe and lovely bike. The Public C7-i is a great bike to make into a superior electric bike. The gears are internal and it is super comfy. I am converting the men's version today. It is the V7-i and a larger version of the Small British racing green bike shown. What is fun is these bikes out perform the $7400 bikes from stores and they do not look or feel like clunky electric bikes. Smooth. No thrilling surge and lurch associated with the heavy, online only, rear-drive bikes.
Looks like a nice neat conversion, is the battery the water bottle? What's the range like.
 

ExPatBrit

Active Member
We were able to test ride the Rad City Step thru when on vacation in CA when they first came out. The Rad City came within a few pounds of her Radrover; but, it just felt like a smaller, lighter, more maneuverable, and more comfortable bike to ride for her size. She felt more confident and no issues doing the city tour of Newport Beach, CA.

Did you rent from Liam on Balboa Island? I did that prior to buying my Rover.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Looks like a nice neat conversion, is the battery the water bottle? What's the range like.
Yes, these look a lot like a water bottle. 3.04 pounds. Range depends on how they are ridden. I know that that is not very satisfying for an answer, so I will give a couple of examples.
We do group rides on Thursdays. Last week we only had three bikes, see photo. A Sondors, a Specialized Vado 5.0 and one of my bikes with a small battery in a water bottle cage. After 26 miles of hills the Sondors was on its last bar. The Vado which has five-bars was down by two. The bike I rode with four-bars was bilinking between 3 and 4 under heavy load but showed 4-bars while stopped. I have done 48-miles on one mini battery using power levels 1 & 2 with some hills, stops and starts. I have also run them hard up a mountain and depleted one after 22 miles of climbing. Sheading weight make a big difference on range. The bike's physics do not differentiate battery weight from any other weight. All weight is bad. The industry trend is toward light bikes with light motors and and with light batteries. https://fazua.com/en/drive-system/evation/
 

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