RadRover owner - Review videos inside!

SuperGoop

Active Member
Yes, love your videos. I watched them all even before this post. Keep them coming!

I actually don't have the Radrover, but instead, I have the Voltbike Yukon 750. A very similar bike (same Bafang G06 750W fatbike) at a slightly lower total price (US$1,499+70 shipping). I posted lots of pictures (but no videos) with some upgrades which can apply to your Radrover as well. Check it out here: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/new-voltbike-yukon-750-spotted.8120/

I also posted my experience with an inexpensive rack (US$200) that fits fatbikes with fenders and works well as a bikestand here: https://electricbikereview.com/foru...n-one-fat-ebikes-with-fenders-welcomed.10190/

Most of my thoughts and accessories for my Yukon 750 can translate to your Radrover.
 
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mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I love your reviews of the Radrover and accessories. Pretty much have the same praises and complaints; but, overall extremely pleased with the RR ebike. The Radrover is an extremely comfortable long haul bike with an addition of a larger seat. I don't get "numb hands" after 20-30 minutes like I do with my old GT Transeo 3.o hybrid commuter bike.

One thing I had to do is double-check all the nuts/bolts for the rack, rear derailleur guard, and water bottle mount points (added blue loctite to see if that would help keep them secured). I even double-checked the front and rear spokes because a few were a little loose after a few hundred miles.

I was tempted with the Voltbike. I wish I had the ability to test ride side-by-side. Just on paper, the Radrover had a some little extras that put it over the top
 

SuperGoop

Active Member
I was tempted with the Voltbike. I wish I had the ability to test ride side-by-side. Just on paper, the Radrover had a some little extras that put it over the top
A friend is interested after seeing my Yukon 750 and comparing it to the Radrover. Since I don't have experience with the Radrover, may I ask what those little extras were that made you choose the Radrover over the Yukon 750? Thanks.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
- larger leather looking hand grips with palm rest and very nice looking stitching
- I can plug/play and upgrade to a Luna cycle brand of 52v/13.5ah battery for more range/power because the RR beefed up controller
- ability to adjust the PAS up to 40 km/h (little under 25 mph). I use PAS 4 and my mph is between 20.5-22.5 mph depending on the incline of the road.
- 3 bottle cage holders on the bike located with one on the underside of down tube and either side of top tube near handlebars
- 180mm front and rear brake disks (docs say 180mm front/160mm rears; but, they are both look like 180mm)
- suspension forks with lock out (use lock out for commuting, adjustable for trail riding)
- quick release on front tires (came in handy on my first flat)
- neoprene chain slap guard
- more comfortable standard seat
- came with a rear light (replaced; but, use RR rear light on bike helmet for 5:30am commute)
- Looked like a more comfortable riding position for me (6'3", 265lbs) and wife (4'11", 130lbs) when comparing both bikes on ElectricBikeReview.com
- seems easier to add the triangle bag for the RR to help the battery against summer dust/dirt and winter cold temps.
- I just figured being a Seattle company, they would make sure the RR would be protected against wet weather.
- There were 3X-4X more reviews of the RR compared to Voltbike. Wasn't sure of the weight limit of the Voltbike; but, on-line review of a testers weighing 290-295lbs had no problems with the RR (Barnacules Nerdgasm YouTube reviews). I'm about that heavy with commuting gear (lunch, cold weather stuff, work cloths, etc...) and bike accessories (rack, Topeak rack bag with panniers, fenders, extra lights, Suntour NCX SP12 suspension post, cloud-9 seat).
 
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SuperGoop

Active Member
@mrgold35 Thanks! That's exactly what I was looking for. I agree with all of them. The Yukon 750 also have some advantages over the Radrover, but I agree with your list. Sometimes, it is hard to notice the little things until you've actually own and experienced the bike for a few months.
 

hojac

New Member
I was also going back and forth between which to buy. The differences you mentioned can easily and cheaply be changed on the Yukon. The reason I went with the Yukon is because of the battery and controller setup in the frame (something that can't be changed on the 2016 Rover).

I think you see more reviews On Rover because it's been out for a much longer time since 2015, and the Yukon 750 since September 2016. I think one would be happy with either bike.
 

SuperGoop

Active Member
For comparison, on the Yukon 750:

1) 12 magnet sensor (very responsive motor on/off... almost makes the brake cut-off unnecessary); vs. 6 magnet on the RR
2) 10 levels (0-9) of Pedal Assists (PAS); vs. 5 levels on the RR
3) Integrated downtube battery (newer, more contemporary design)
4) Integrated/hidden controller
5) Battery design shared by other popular bikes (Juiced Bikes, FLX, etc) for future proofing
6) Full length fenders, rack and rear light (off main battery) for $100 extra (much harder to source full length fenders for Radrover)
7) Rack has a handy spring load to quickly secure items without straps
8) 30 TPI wired bead tire for better puncture resistant (but not as comfortable and less "premium", but I prefer it)
9) Shipping via train in Canada (one-stop across Canada, less potential shipping damage)
10) Much cleaner cable management
11) Lower total price (including shipping)
12) For Canadians, the Radrover is prohibitive due to cross-border hassle and shipping and weak exchange rate.

Note: Water bottle cages and mounting bosses, slap guard, and shorter stem in future batches starting around December 10th.
 
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mrgold35

Well-Known Member
You really can't go wrong with either bike. I'm just glad to have some choices in fat tire ebikes at a reasonable price point AND have a 1 year warranty for both. I already used my warranty twice and had a few email questions and RR has been very responsive. I've seen ebikes with less features and capabilities starting at $2,000-$2,700.
 

SuperGoop

Active Member
You really can't go wrong with either bike. I'm just glad to have some choices in fat tire ebikes at a reasonable price point AND have a 1 year warranty for both. I already used my warranty twice and had a few email questions and RR has been very responsive. I've seen ebikes with less features and capabilities starting at $2,000-$2,700.
Agreed. I could not justify buying those really "nice" proprietary design bikes for US$3,000-7,000. Court interviewed a whole bunch of them at Interbike. Seems risky to invest in something at those prices with proprietary designs. I am just really glad www.RadPowerBikes.com and www.Voltbike.ca both exists to fit us.

Incidentally, I just came across this site: https://shop.m2sbikes.com/ They seem to have similarly spec'd bikes at similar prices. Anyone heard of them? I think they are new, and shipping in March, 2017.
 
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BVC

Active Member
Thanks all! I just got back from camping on the beach..where I of course took the RadRover and boy was it a blast!!! I got some footage that I'll work on editing later this week. But the bike did fairly well.

However I noticed my pedals are starting to rust at the bolts. Looking over the rest of the bike I didn't see any rust but we'll see in a few more days how it holds up.

(Did NOT ride in the water, FYI. I only do that on my cheap bike as for one, I'll get wet and two - not really willing to risk tossing away $1500 for some salt water play :p )
 

TrikeKentucky

New Member
I don't have a E-bike yet, still shopping and the RR is on my list. How are the fat tires compared to road tires. Are they smoother depending on the air. I've heard they can be let down really low. I'm not near sand but they look so cool !!
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I don't have a E-bike yet, still shopping and the RR is on my list. How are the fat tires compared to road tires. Are they smoother depending on the air. I've heard they can be let down really low. I'm not near sand but they look so cool !!
I have a bike with 700X40c tires set around 50-60 psi and the Radrover set around 18-20 psi. Both bike have front suspension and I just transfer my Suntour SP12 NCX suspension seatpost and Sunlite 12.5X11.5 Cloud-9 seat between them.

The Radrover is so much smoother on paved road because the fat tires can soak up the road imperfections compared to being transferred to the rider like my 700X40c bike. The Radrover is very stable and comfortable at 20-22 mph on paved roads for my morning commutes. You do have a lot of road noise from the RR tires; but, you quickly get use to it and I don't even think about it now. I spend more time sitting on my seat with the RR during my 6.5 mile commute compared to always lifting off my seats for road imperfections with my old bike. I have to ride main roads, side streets, sidewalks, paved bike trails, and across a dirt lot and the RR makes each transition at speed without missing a beat. I would suggest a suspension seatpost like Thudbuster, bodyfloat, or Suntour. The standard seat is comfortable; but, the Sunlite Cloud-9 is extremely comfortable (never ever had a sore bottom after +3 yrs of use).

I've ridden both bikes on the hard packed, rocky, and/or sandy trails and the Radrover does a much better job off road. I just set the PSI to around 10-12 because the trail can go to hard, rocky, to sandy very quickly in the southwest. The advantage with the PAS and throttle is when negotiating rock and tight turns. On a regular bike, the pedals would hit the rocks or you can only coast around a tight corners. I love having the throttle to keep my speed and power up negotiating obstacles and tight turns. You don't get the front tire dig-in on sand like you do with a thinner tire when you turn the front tire.

I've tested my rover in extremely loose and dry sand that was about +4 inches deep. That would have been 100% impossible for my 700X40c bike to ride through. It was extremely slow going, I had to stand up to pedal, and my motor was maxed out (don't think I could have made any progress without PAS). I was worried I would overheat the motor and I was 6 miles from home (decided to walk the bike to harder ground).

I would also suggest tire liners (Mr. Tuffy) with sealant (2-4 oz per tire of Stan's tire sealant). The 4" fat tires run over a lot of debris like wood splinters, sharp rocks, broken metal, thorns, and broken glass at 20 mph on the side of the road that would cause a flat on an unprotected tire.
 
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TrikeKentucky

New Member
I "liked"what you said. I was thinking they would be like a Cadillac's huge side wall tire. So smooth. I'm not familiar with the thudbuster seat post but I'll check them out. Thanks so much for the info on the tires.