Radwagon or rad city?

windmill

Active Member
I went through the same thought process myself, I ended up getting the Radwagon for its additional versatility. Its a shorter than average cargo bikes so its ride quality feels "normal".
The primary reasons to choose the city over the wagon would be if one doesn't need substantial carrying capacity, or desires to take their bike on a train, or bus.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
I have a Radwagon. Love it. Kind of wish I had the RC instead. Every bump on the RW rattles your bones. I have not test ridden the RC.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
Have you checked out the reviews on EBR?

I like the Rad City for me because of the front suspension, different frame sizes, and the smaller storage/public trans foot print. having the front forks (along with suspension seat post) help smooth out the ride at +15 mph on city streets. I find hard packed dirt trails can me smoother compared to paved city streets, sidewalks, or even paved bike paths. The more time you can stay in your seat compared to lifting up/down makes for a much more comfortable and less fatiguing ride if you have long distances to commute.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
Thanks. I wonder if I could carry groceries on a radcity?

The same bags you were looking at for the Rad Wagon should fit on the Rad City also. I have a Topeka DXP rack bag with expandable Panniers I can fold down when needed. I also have an Osprey Radial 34 Daypack that is very comfortable to wear and holds a lot of gear/groceries.
 

RyanConway

New Member
FWIW I put a suspension seatpost, and a SID SL 63mm travel front suspension fork on my radwagon. Not too pricey on ebay and much smoother ride (Denver streets are notoriously bad). The stock fork has a longer than average axle to crown length, I thought the SID would cause an increased head tube angle, but actually with sag it's the opposite. The steering is faster.

Also my seatpost is a dropper/suspension, which turns out to be very handy for commuting as I can lower it while waiting at a red light.

One advantage to the wagon is there is room for a 2nd battery in the space behind the seat. I put a 2nd dolphin there, and added a front hub motor (q100H) for 2wd. Double the range, much faster acceleration and climbing.

Another thing to consider for shopping duties is the ability to tie boxes etc to the running boards and rear frame. I took off the running boards (and got a derailleur protector), but I still use all the frame back there to attach stuff.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
FWIW I put a suspension seatpost, and a SID SL 63mm travel front suspension fork on my radwagon. Not too pricey on ebay and much smoother ride (Denver streets are notoriously bad). The stock fork has a longer than average axle to crown length, I thought the SID would cause an increased head tube angle, but actually with sag it's the opposite. The steering is faster.

Also my seatpost is a dropper/suspension, which turns out to be very handy for commuting as I can lower it while waiting at a red light.

One advantage to the wagon is there is room for a 2nd battery in the space behind the seat. I put a 2nd dolphin there, and added a front hub motor (q100H) for 2wd. Double the range, much faster acceleration and climbing.

Another thing to consider for shopping duties is the ability to tie boxes etc to the running boards and rear frame. I took off the running boards (and got a derailleur protector), but I still use all the frame back there to attach stuff.

I love to see some pictures of your set up for the Radwagon.
 

RyanConway

New Member
Sure-

Here is what it looks like right now. The q100h is a tiny little motor, but it's a powerhouse- I can actually put a full 900w into it. That said it won't overheat because it has help from the rear.

I'll probably ride it as is for a year, but I want to pay attention to what the rear dropouts look like and ultimately swap the rear motor and controller. I don't think that the stock torque washers are adequate in the long run- the better motor designs have "axle flats" that allow a stronger torque arm to prevent damage to the dropout. Unfortunately the motor Rad used doesn't have the flats so you can't even add a torque arm if you want to.
 

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windmill

Active Member
I have a Radwagon. Love it. Kind of wish I had the RC instead. Every bump on the RW rattles your bones. I have not test ridden the RC.
I just replaced the stock Kendas with Schwalbe Big Ben plus tires, and they are superior in every way. The ability to run them at lower pressure than the stock tire they are a significant improvement in comfort, they roll faster and smoother with a slightly smaller circumference which has improved range, and offer about the best flat protection available.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

Given that the city is lighter, has a shorter wheelbase, and has the same size tires, even with its suspension fork it probably rides rougher. I have a Gazelle trekking bike that's similar in geometry to the city and has a higher quality air suspension fork, yet it rides rougher than my wagon.
 
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RyanConway

New Member
I just replaced the stock Kendas with Schwalbe Big Ben plus tires,


+1. I think the Big Ben plus are probably the perfect tube tire for the wagon. I haven't wanted to mess with tubeless, but in that department hookworms or holy rollers could also be good, I guess some people do have luck getting the stock Kenda's setup tubeless.

To me the 2 mods a RW needs right away are better tires, and a 11t freewheel- especially if you plan to change the top assist speed to 40km/hr.
 

RyanConway

New Member
I'm waiting on a Sunrace 11-34 cassette. Eventually I want to replace the crankset with a Patterson metropolis https://www.pattersonbike.com/patterson-transmission-crankset/ which will give it a greater range of gears top and bottom.

Wow that thing is cool. What size chainring would you use with it? The stock 28-45 would be too low for me, with the 2wd I pretty much live at 48-11. But the larger chainrings are really interesting, with the 36 you get an equivalent of 58 in the high gear, that's a monster. I was thinking of going to 1x at some point but this might be the better option.
 

windmill

Active Member
I forgot they offered optional chainrings. Sounds like a http://www.schlumpfdrive.com/ is what you might prefer. Expensive 3x the price, but a far greater range of choices, and the heel shifting rather than a cabled shifter is awesome.
 
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