Re-tired

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
Put new tires on my Rad Rover yesterday, after about 1900 miles. I should have rotated the tires a while back I guess. The rear was almost slick but the front still had a good bit of tread.

Anyway, it was the first time I had the rear wheel off. I had one flat on it that I was able to patch without taking the wheel off. Slime since then. Which brings me to my first point. Getting the tires off and pulling the old tubes out, I was surprised to only notice 2 small seeps of Slime, where it had prevented flats. I didn't examine the tubes closely; I may go back and do that. I was surprised, especially on the rear not to have seen more evidence of Slime-filled punctures.

I used a bike work stand which made the job easy, although swinging a 70 lb bike around upside down put the stand to a test. It passed nicely. Park PCS-9.

It was a little tough getting the rear wheel out of the dropouts. It took some banging and rocking, but it came out finally. It's easier now that it's been done....

Changing the tubes and tires was perfectly routine. I put Kenda Juggernauts, 26 x 4 back on. I've been happy with them. The only problem I had was I put the back tire on backwards. The Juggernauts are directional and I had them on upside down. Of course I didn't notice until I had the rear tire back on after a spin test. That's how I know that the rear wheel comes out of the dropouts a lot easier after the first time.

I did the harder one first, then moved on to the front wheel. Nothing much to it, but amazingly, stupidly, I put the front tire on backwards too. I guess it had something to do with the bike being upside down in the bike stand. So, I got some more practice breaking beads, etc. (which is very easy on these fat tires.).

I all ready had the bike back together and had done a little test ride before I noticed the problem with the front tire. Rather than put the bike back on the stand, I decided to use my Handlebar Jacks this time and just flip the bike on the ground. The Handlebar Jacks worked great! Not a big surprise, but nice to know for when I have a flat on the trail.

One other thing. I carry CO2 for flats and airing up, but I recently decided a manual pump would be a good thing to have too, just in case. I got a Crankbrothers Klic High Pressure High Volume Hand Pump from Amazon. This one. It's a nice piece of work. Seems like really good quality. I used it to puff up my tubes a bit during installation. It took, no kidding, 100 pumps, to give the tubes just a little bit of structure. This is not going to be my go-to tool of choice for airing up my fat tires!

Finally, I put about 6 ounces of Slime in both tubes. By the way, there was no mess whatsoever dealing with the old Slimed tubes.

All done, I took the bike out for a little run on the Natchez Trace Parkway, about 22 miles, to test things out and spread the Slime around evenly. The weather was beautiful and it was Tuesday evening, so there was none of the weekend traffic, and it was about an hour before sunset, so relatively cool. I was passed by exactly 8 cars in most of two hours on the road. Saw roughly 50 turkeys, and a doe with her still spotted fawn.

TT
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Learned my lesson a long time ago regarding "directional". I mounted a snowmobile track pointing the wrong way. THAT was a lot of work! One of those "lessons" learned the hard way, that you NEVER forget!

Tire and tube changes on hub motor will keep getting easier. I don't even need to cut wire ties or disconnect the wires any more. As long as the axle is clear of the drop outs, you're good to go.

And the negative Slime opinions. Now what do you think of them? As far as amount added, I guess at about 6-8oz. From there, I've found that if the tires loose air, needing frequent pressure checks, I'll add a little more.

Love my rides at dusk. That's when you are most likely to see "critters" of all kinds in my experience. -Al
 
I haven't had to deal with a flat yet. I carry a hand pump from Amazon but always knew it would suck to pump up a RadRover tire. Recently Bolton Ebikes put out a video about a portable Electric bike pump that they are allowing pre-orders for (ships next month) you might want to check this out...
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I love this pump for my garage. I keep a handpump in the Rockbros bag, but this Avid works great for at home use. Also, it is cheaper on Amazon.

 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I also carry a mini-pump though I prefer the convenience of my CO2 inflator! My record is 3 flats in a single day so the pump,is my ultimate backup, but it sure is a lot of work on a hot day...😂

What size CO2 cartridges do you carry for your 26x4s? My tires need ~25 grams but being thrifty (ok, cheap) I buy 16g cartridges at ~$1 ea and use 1.5 cartridges to refill after a flat. I carry 3 cartridges so I'm good for 2 flats on my day rides.
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
I carry five or six 25 g cartridges. I'd swear when I bought them they were a lot cheaper than I can find them now. I'm cheap too and the idea of puffing $4 into my tire almost instantly is tough, but they were $1.75 each when I got a 15-pack not all that long ago. I'm hoping the price will go back down at some point. But, yeah, if I find a bargain on smaller carts I might go for it.

It takes every bit of a 25 g cart to fill my fatties. I carry so many, mostly because I have room and why not? But they come in handy when I'm airing up and down at the beach. Or if you have 2 or 3 flats in a day. And sometimes you think you fixed a flat only to find out you didn't so you can use twice as many carts as you should have.

After trying my new hand pump I may put a couple more carts in by bag!

TT
 

Kyogiro

Member
I have a mini Lezyne floor pump for my longer travels. It is a bit expensive for a pump but it is one of the best if you are traveling, it also has a pressure meter which is very useful.

For commuting, just a regular cheap hand pump, tires levers and 2 tubes.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I carry five or six 25 g cartridges. I'd swear when I bought them they were a lot cheaper than I can find them now. I'm cheap too and the idea of puffing $4 into my tire almost instantly is tough, but they were $1.75 each when I got a 15-pack not all that long ago. I'm hoping the price will go back down at some point. But, yeah, if I find a bargain on smaller carts I might go for it.

It takes every bit of a 25 g cart to fill my fatties. I carry so many, mostly because I have room and why not? But they come in handy when I'm airing up and down at the beach. Or if you have 2 or 3 flats in a day. And sometimes you think you fixed a flat only to find out you didn't so you can use twice as many carts as you should have.

After trying my new hand pump I may put a couple more carts in by bag!

TT
Great price on those 25g's. If I could find them for that, I'd use 'em too!
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
Put new tires on my Rad Rover yesterday, after about 1900 miles. I should have rotated the tires a while back I guess. The rear was almost slick but the front still had a good bit of tread.

I got 2000 out of the rear tire, 2400 from the front. The rear tire's life may have been shortened by the six weeks of motoring the bike up the stairs (elevator was out). While the bike will climb stairs in walk mode, it's hard to keep the rear wheel from bouncing and spinning. One thing I've learned the hard way: when wrangling the bike onto a rack or flipping it upside down, take the battery and lock off first. 10 pounds lighter improves my back's odds.
 
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