Rear hub drive mountain bike recomendations

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
When considering a rear hub motor for a FS MTB, I'd suggsst you take a look at the Grin Tech article on Why Hub Motors. It starts with this discussion of mid-drive motors;

"There are a certain areas where bottom bracket middrive motors are hands down better suited than hub motors. Offroad mountain biking is one great example. The motor weight is low and on the unsprung frame so it has minimal effect on handling even in full suspension bikes. In these situations you are often going slowly uphill through trails with short steep sections and a small motor working through the drivechain in the granny gears of the bike can do this with excellent efficiency. Another example would be say fat bikes riding in sandy beaches or through fresh snow. These are areas where the bike is moving at lowish speeds through high resistance terrain, and the mid-motor in an easy gearing will do this with better efficiency than most hubs drives, while still performing just as well on the faster roads."

From my perspective these points all combine to make mid-drive FS MTBs predominant in the market.

As an aside, Grin Tech also manufacturers the GMAC hub motor referenced in other posts. I have purchased other hub motors from Grin that were excellent. I'm sure their GMAC motor is as well, esp for its intended uses - "heavy hauling and steep hills". One observation, the Grin Motor Simulator demonstrates that the GMAC motors produce peak power outputs well over the 1hp/746W definition of a bicycle here in the States. This limits ebikes over this output to private property or requires them them to be road licensed. Just sayin'.

That's one reason you see bike mfg's using Bafang Ultra units (currently selling like hot cakes) rated at 750 watts. Clearly, they are capable of much more. That's just one example, in addition to the MAC's.

The point is, it's pretty clear at this point nobody is looking at a motor's potential from an enforcement standpoint, including those imported into Canada who's max ratings are even more stringent.

Bottom line, worry if you must, but I'm going to go about my business in a sane manner. I'll become more concerned when/if I see/hear about more frequent enforcement actions on a local basis.
 

kmccune

Active Member
When considering a rear hub motor for a FS MTB, I'd suggsst you take a look at the Grin Tech article on Why Hub Motors. It starts with this discussion of mid-drive motors;

"There are a certain areas where bottom bracket middrive motors are hands down better suited than hub motors. Offroad mountain biking is one great example. The motor weight is low and on the unsprung frame so it has minimal effect on handling even in full suspension bikes. In these situations you are often going slowly uphill through trails with short steep sections and a small motor working through the drivechain in the granny gears of the bike can do this with excellent efficiency. Another example would be say fat bikes riding in sandy beaches or through fresh snow. These are areas where the bike is moving at lowish speeds through high resistance terrain, and the mid-motor in an easy gearing will do this with better efficiency than most hubs drives, while still performing just as well on the faster roads."

From my perspective these points all combine to make mid-drive FS MTBs predominant in the market.

As an aside, Grin Tech also manufacturers the GMAC hub motor referenced in other posts. I have purchased other hub motors from Grin that were excellent. I'm sure their GMAC motor is as well, esp for its intended uses - "heavy hauling and steep hills". One observation, the Grin Motor Simulator demonstrates that the GMAC motors produce peak power outputs well over the 1hp/746W definition of a bicycle here in the States. This limits ebikes over this output to private property or requires them them to be road licensed. Just sayin'.
True! on the other hand, 500 watts in the rear with a small geared motor in the front may be surprisingly affordable, one thing to remember about the handling, big tires eat power and a 25 ah battery mounted high might make things a bit top-heavy as well. The glorious thing on a hardcore MTB is a small midrive reputable motor feeding through the gearset with a reasonable battery pack( whats not to love except price)
You can get a lot of performance per gram with a high voltage motor( always tradeoffs) 36 volt MTBs are certainly worth considering, the "climb" takes away the fun for a lot of Folks, modern tech gives it back
 

kmccune

Active Member
That's one reason you see bike mfg's using Bafang Ultra units (currently selling like hot cakes) rated at 750 watts. Clearly, they are capable of much more. That's just one example, in addition to the MAC's.

The point is, it's pretty clear at this point nobody is looking at a motor's potential from an enforcement standpoint, including those imported into Canada who's max ratings are even more stringent.

Bottom line, worry if you must, but I'm going to go about my business in a sane manner. I'll become more concerned when/if I see/hear about more frequent enforcement actions on a local basis.
Come to VA, if they can write a ticket they will.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Come to VA, if they can write a ticket they will.
Up through mid-Summer there was an 'over powered' ebike cruising our small hilly town. I say over powered as the 30 something rider could easily pass me on steeper grades where my ebike reports peak powers of up to 800W. I saw him pulled over by a local Sheriff in SEP and haven't seen him on the local roads since.
 

kmccune

Active Member
Up through mid-Summer there was an 'over powered' ebike cruising our small hilly town. I say over powered as the 30 something rider could easily pass me on steeper grades where my ebike reports peak powers of up to 800W. I saw him pulled over by a local Sheriff in SEP and haven't seen him on the local roads since.
Its a thing in this increasingly"Nanny state",I see Netflix is raising their "photon-electron" rental by $1 a month, doesn't sound like much, it all adds up, greed knows no bounds.( Nanny-State= the country where you live)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Its a thing in this increasingly"Nanny state",I see Netflix is raising their "photon-electron" rental by $1 a month, doesn't sound like much, it all adds up, greed knows no bounds.( Nanny-State= the country where you live)
I live/ride in Michigan and Florida and I don't remember ever seeing or hearing about any reference to an e-bike enforcement anywhere - and I'm an avid newspaper reader.
 

kmccune

Active Member
I live/ride in Michigan and Florida and I don't remember ever seeing or hearing about any reference to an e-bike enforcement anywhere - and I'm an avid newspaper reader.
Sierratim just listed one, come to VA and push your luck( you will be contributing to the state surplus)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
My point was, my personal paranoia factor will let me ride pretty easily - until I see a LOT more reason for concern - in the areas I ride most frequently. -Al
 

kmccune

Active Member
My point was, my personal paranoia factor will let me ride pretty easily - until I see a LOT more reason for concern - in the areas I ride most frequently. -Al
Thank you, may your trails have no loose gravel or "anklebreakers"( Had to give up my closest forest rd because of that)
 
I live/ride in Michigan and Florida and I don't remember ever seeing or hearing about any reference to an e-bike enforcement anywhere - and I'm an avid newspaper reader.

In California, you'd also be hard pressed to find/see enforcement of ebikes on trails. In a way, that is a good thing as it reduces the risk of physical confrontations knowing that no one will save you if you choose to really push the issue and end up on the losing side.

Too bad to hear that apparently in Virginia, they are eager and waiting to cite/ticket emtb violations.
 

kmccune

Active Member
In California, you'd also be hard pressed to find/see enforcement of ebikes on trails. In a way, that is a good thing as it reduces the risk of physical confrontations knowing that no one will save you if you choose to really push the issue and end up on the losing side.

Too bad to hear that apparently in Virginia, they are eager and waiting to cite/ticket emtb violations.
Its like they 'vetted" people for enforcement personal that like to write tickets. iI have enriched VA's coffers on more than one occasion.