rechargeable portable pump $35

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Profiteering by an Amazon seller (individual jerk) has NOTHING to do with Canada as a country.
Nope, you're wrong again, Dave Mathews. It's quite common and has been, long before Amazon even existed. There exists more reasons why that was so, but nonetheless, we pay more.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Here we go again. Evidence means nothing to some people, though.

Canada
https://www.amazon.ca/Poyet-Motte-A...00-Percent+Wool+Blanket&qid=1617768459&sr=8-6
$399.34 CAD

USA
$194.79 USD
That equals $245.16 CAD


$399 vs $245
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
I use this lightweight portable pump... quick and easy with digital readout.

The price is right if you already have a Ryobi Battery ... $29 shipped ;)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...b&pd_rd_w=ky5Qc&pd_rd_wg=KnCsH&ref_=pd_gw_unk



1617808870141.png
 
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m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
If its inside my garage and I'm after convenience, I use this one from Milwaukee Tool, but only because I already have a half dozen tools that already use these batteries. If this unit is any indication, the whole dial-a-psi thing is dangerous. I learned if I wanted to set a fat commuter tire to 18 psi I needed to set this one to 13. It actually stops at 16. I have other tires in the 50-65 psi range and its similarly, terrifyingly inaccurate. Gotta have a quality gauge that you use for a reality check!

milwaukee-inflator-hero[1].jpg
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Francisco, Bay Area
If its inside my garage and I'm after convenience, I use this one from Milwaukee Tool, but only because I already have a half dozen tools that already use these batteries. If this unit is any indication, the whole dial-a-psi thing is dangerous. I learned if I wanted to set a fat commuter tire to 18 psi I needed to set this one to 13. It actually stops at 16. I have other tires in the 50-65 psi range and its similarly, terrifyingly inaccurate. Gotta have a quality gauge that you use for a reality check!

View attachment 84151


This is true for my Sun Joe inflator as well. Luckily, it overinflates pretty consistently at 2 PSI over when it's used for my tubeless tires. It's about 1 PSI over if used on my car tires.

v35237.001
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
You can make one that piggybacks off of your existing battery so less weight. One of these absolutely saved my ass when I ran over a half dozen roofing nails from a nailgun strip. I was tubeless and using FlatOut as the sealant. Without this pump to put some serious volume back into my Snowshoe XLs, I'd have been done for on a cargo bike loaded from a Home Depot run.

It took three refills with a block in between each but after the 3rd everything held. No way could co2 or my arms/Lezyne fat micropump do that. The only catch is you need to put your own plug on the end of it.

Have had to use the thing a half dozen times over the last year. Totally spoiled now and won't ride without one.

Me neither - after it arrives and I do the modification. A question comes to mind, though.
Will the USB charging port on the battery be able to deliver enough power?
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Will the USB charging port on the battery be able to deliver enough power?
I’ve seen issues with those ports. A 10 cent item and 10 cent quality. I have a USB port voltage tester. But found I have fewer problems with a 18650 power pack. As always, YMMV.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I’ve seen issues with those ports. A 10 cent item and 10 cent quality. I have a USB port voltage tester. But found I have fewer problems with a 18650 power pack. As always, YMMV.
I've been steering my purchases where possible to have 18650 capability - for example for headlights I use multiple small flashlights that take single 18650 cells. I have 18650 power banks as well. The things about accessing the bike battery that seem important are
a. large tires that might need to be filled several times might need more battery
b. you save carrying the weight of an additional battery

It seems odd to me that a 2000mAh battery would be adequate to fill tires.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
a. large tires that might need to be filled several times might need more battery
b. you save carrying the weight of an additional battery
It doesn't happen often that I go thru the scenario I described earlier here. 26x4.8 tires then. Another time was 26x4.3 Ednas, and on another bike its been 26x4.0 Supercells. I just can't say enough about having a 20-30ah battery to back me up on the pump.

Regardless though... an onboard compressor in the toolkit is a huge step up.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
You can make one that piggybacks off of your existing battery so less weight. One of these absolutely saved my ass when I ran over a half dozen roofing nails from a nailgun strip. I was tubeless and using FlatOut as the sealant. Without this pump to put some serious volume back into my Snowshoe XLs, I'd have been done for on a cargo bike loaded from a Home Depot run.

It took three refills with a block in between each but after the 3rd everything held. No way could co2 or my arms/Lezyne fat micropump do that. The only catch is you need to put your own plug on the end of it.

Have had to use the thing a half dozen times over the last year. Totally spoiled now and won't ride without one.

My air pump arrived. Now to buy the 2-prong plug that fits the battery discharge port. It's really a neat little idea, this 48v pump.
That was a nagging little problem that I had not dealt with, now solved.
Thank you m@Robertson!


These look like the kind of set but not quite
 
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penserv

Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary, AB
I got a Mojietu Lightning rechargeable pump off Indiegogo and I quite like it. It will inflate up to 150 psi and has a memory for the last 5 settings, which is handy. I have one setting for my front air suspension forks and another for tires. It will do schrader or presta valves. I've never timed it, but the last time I filled my tire to 27 psi after repairing a leak didn't seem overly long. The charge lasts several topoffs for the front forks and it's just a USB-C cable. I can charge the pump off my USB ports while I'm riding. I just keep it in my saddlebag for those little emergencies when you'd pay any amount of money for a good pump.
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
Did a bunch of comparison shopping, and ended up getting the Cycplus A2 as a surprise birthday present (it was on my shortlist).


Compared to the popular Oasser pump (and others with similar specs, though I've only seen the Oasser in action personally):

Pros: small, lightweight (under 365 grams with the supplied pouch). Includes cage for bottle bosses. Gauge within 1 PSI tolerance compared to Topeak digital gauge. The Cycplus reads a little higher in comparison. Like many others, can double as a power bank or flashlight (not a big deal but a nice "just in case").

Cons: a little slower than most. Smaller battery than most. A little noisier than the Oasser, but this is through recollection, not measuring dB. :)

When I first got it, I tested it out by pumping up two tires... one 20"x4" and one 50-584 (2" 650b) from flat.

The 20"x4" took just over 4 minutes to get to 20 PSI, and just over 2 minutes to get the 650b up to 38 PSI, on one charge. There wasn't much battery left at that point. Don't know how MUCH, and I doubt I'll ever need to find out (knock on wood). Based the battery gauge, and other other pumps with bigger batteries and their estimates this might get a 3rd tire part way there, at best.

Bottom line:

Not the fastest, but enough to deal with a couple of flats on a ride (always hope for zero :) ). If you only want a powered pump for bike tires and smaller things like basketballs etc., then it's worth considering.

If you want an inflator for your car/truck tires, this probably isn't it. It just doesn't have the battery life, and the pump strikes me as less powerful than others. You MIGHT get a car tire out of it, maybe, if the pump can hold out. That would be my guess, and seems to be borne out from some reviews.

Great for bi-weekly bike tire top-offs at home, and there's no reason not to throw it in the trunk bag on an afternoon (or longer) ride, given how lightweight it is.