Recommendations for refurbishing a 2014 stromer st2

Neal olson

New Member
Hello All,
I am a happy original owner of a 2014 Stromer st2, which despite some initial hickups, has served me well over the past 7+ years & 18,000+miles. For my second pandemic project, looking to add a couple of extra touches to the bike including:
-a front suspension fork
-raise the handlebars a few inches
-an electric horn

A couple of questions, does anyone have experience with any of the above projects and would be willing to recommend products? I've heard that suntour makes a decent shock that fits the st2 (Epixon 26"), any other recommendations for a replacement suspension fork or horn? Or...any other upgrades that st2 owners have been happy with?

Thanks in advance for your time!
Neal
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Q-ur 2014 St2 has had no issues all those years ?? that's amazing, congrats 👍.

The newer Stromers were not so lucky I've heard...
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
I am a happy original owner of a 2014 Stromer st2,

Did you know the the whole Stromer fleet made more than 200'000'000 kilometers - and all based on the groundbreaking ST2 presented in 2014 and its successors?

If you plan to ride in a upright position, a suspension fork will not have priority. All your weight will be on the saddle, so you need the famous BodyFloat. The upright position has negative impact of the steering capability, so be careful at Stromer speed!
 

Neal olson

New Member
Did you know the the whole Stromer fleet made more than 200'000'000 kilometers - and all based on the groundbreaking ST2 presented in 2014 and its successors?

If you plan to ride in a upright position, a suspension fork will not have priority. All your weight will be on the saddle, so you need the famous BodyFloat. The upright position has negative impact of the steering capability, so be careful at Stromer speed!
Thanks Bluecat, I may have to rethink the suspension then....
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Electric horn? For $12 I got a bulb type horn that is insanely loud from ebay. The bike came with
a more polite sounding bell, but the horn definitely demands attention. Finding riser bars shouldn´t
be difficult, but the length of cable harness may limit the amount of rise available. I put some older
Wald 5¨ risers on mine, but needed an adapter from 25.4 to 31mm stem, basically a locking shim.
31mm risers cost twice what I paid for the Wald new old stock. I think the adapter was $5, both ebay.
Suspension fork takes some edge off bumps but adds a good bit of weight. I bet if you check
Craigslist, you´ll find forks in the bike parts section local & cheap you can inspect b4 purchase.
 
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andyw

New Member
I have upgraded my original ST2s rigid fork to a suspension fork. The easiest way to do this is to track down an original ST2 suspension fork. I'm not sure that Stromer USA still has upgrade kits to sell, but I found a used example in fairly good condition. The OEM part that Stromer used on the ST2 was indeed an SR Suntour Epixon, but Suntour no longer produces this model in a 26" size. The closest part they make for 26" wheels is the Raidon. It's also possible to use a fork from another brand, provided the following criteria are met...

- Tapered steerer tube
- Steerer tube at least 12" in length
- 15mm thru axle
- 100mm travel
- disc brake mount

There is also a slight difference in the design of the front fender between the rigid fork and suspension fork bikes. There is a ~2" x 2" t-shaped recess cut into the top layer of the fender material to allow for an attachment point to the fork arch. If you are handy with a Dremel tool, then this seems to be the kind of thing that wouldn't take too much effort. If you need specific dimensions or photos, I can assist you if you go that route. I have the original Stromer fender that came with the suspension fork, so I didn't have to do that. You can re-use your front fender struts, but you will have to obtain the appropriate sized clamps to fit around your suspension fork lowers.

As for handlebar height, the mere switch to a suspension fork with 100mm travel will have the front of the bike resting about 1-1/2" higher than stock when at the upper limit of the fork's travel. This will effectively haise your handlebar height by that amount. The length of the steerer tube is also a potential source of increased height. My original fork was cut fairly short. I only needed one spacer with my original stem. The suspension fork I got was cut longer (12-1/2") and requires three spacers beneath the stem. That gave me another inch or so of handlebar height. If that is not enough for you, there are also 35deg. and 45 deg. fixed aftermarket stems as well as adjustable stems than can give you another couple of inches. There are also stem risers that will increase the height where you attach your current stem. I currently have one of those on my ST2, but I think it looks a little funny.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
I have upgraded my original ST2s rigid fork to a suspension fork

In Europe, all 26" series came with flexible carbon fork, except the ST1x and the V1.

As for handlebar height, the mere switch to a suspension fork with 100mm travel will have the front of the bike resting about 1-1/2" higher than stock when at the upper limit of the fork's travel. This will effectively haise your handlebar height by that amount.

This is an illusion. The triangle between saddle, handlebar and shoulders remains exactly the same. But adding more cm below the head tube (suspension fork or bigger wheel) will lead to a more indirect steering behaviour.