Redshift ShockStop "Full Suspension" Review

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
To start with, let me say my Vado SL is a very stiff e-bike. For the first 600 km, I was suffering when riding on any uneven surface. My head was shaking, my arms were getting numb, and I was exclaiming "Oi!" because of my lower back pain when the rear wheel was meeting any pothole. Encouraged by several EBR Fora members, I decided to invest in the Redshift ShockStop suspension stem and seatpost. To make absolutely sure I made a good investment in these expensive bike parts, I rode for 18 km of very bad local roads at varying speed (from very slow to very fast).

Redshift ShockStop Seatpost

Unboxing
The seatpost comes in an elegant cardboard box. There also is an additional "inner" spring and a detailed instruction manual there.

Installation & Setup
The seatpost is almost ready to be used. The only thing you need to do is to rotate the Preload Adjustment Plug at the bottom of the post to the correct preload position (listed in a table of the instruction manual) appropriate for your weight (the preload position was #3 in my case).
The only circumstance under which you would need to unscrew the plug totally is the case you are a heavy person (over 90 and up to 110 kg that is 200-240 lb) or your riding style requires firmer suspension. In such case, prepare yourself for some mess, as the internals of the seatpost are generously greased. (You would need to remove the internals, insert the additional inner spring inside the main spring, and reassemble the whole thing in reverse order, possibly adding more grease).

After that, you install the seatpost and the saddle as if it just were a regular seatpost with one exception. The chamber holding the saddle-mount bolts is covered with a "fender" that is held in place magnetically (and is secured by a rubber band). You need to pull the bottom of the fender, take it out completely, and then you get the access to the bolts and are able to install the saddle.

1626067895877.png

The fender removed and re-attached.

Ride Comfort

Not very much to write about. The RedShift ShockStop seatpost is such an excellent product your back will be certainly relieved 100%. There was no surface I rode where I could feel any vibration except one dramatically deep pothole; even that didn't make me yell!

Comparing Redshift ShockStop to Cirrus Cycles Kinekt 2.1 suspension seatpost

These two seatposts are equal in performance. The only difference is, I'm getting a little pedal-bob at high cadence with the Kinekt while I experience no pedal-bob with the ShockStop whatsoever (perhaps I should increase the preload on the Kinekt).

1626069732098.png


Redshift ShockStop Stem

Application, sizes
The Redshift ShockStop Stem is suitable for:
  • All types of bikes equipped with the rigid fork, and
  • 1-1/8" A-HEAD steerer tube, and
  • Drop bars or straight handlebars, and
  • For all road types (paved or unpaved), but it is unsuitable for:
  • Any bike equipped with any existing form of front suspension, or
  • Any bike equipped with curved handlebars, or
  • Riding off-road.
The stem comes in sizes:
  • +/- 6 degrees: 80, 90, 100, 110, or 120 mm length, or
  • +30 degrees: 100 mm length only.
Unboxing
The cardboard box includes the stem, a set of colour-coded elastomer inserts, and a detailed instruction manual. The access hole to the internals is covered with a warning sticker.

Disclaimer: Please read the instruction manual in depth, follow instructions to an iota, and watch YouTube tutorial on the stem installation, and -- specifically -- during the setup. Not following the instruction may cause your expensive stem be damaged, rendered unusable, and the warranty doesn't cover such kind of damage.

Installation
The installation itself is done exactly as for any other A-HEAD stem (the setup is another thing!) Observe:
  • You have to insert the stem onto the steerer tube prior to any further action (you can secure it lightly with its bolts)
  • Never -- I say never -- try to unscrew the pivot of the stem, or you're going to damage the part.
  • During the setup, you have to keep the stem arm depressed down when re-inserting and tightening the preload bolt, or you may destroy the thing.
The ShockStop stem comes with two elastomer inserts inside that are preloaded and meant for drop handlebars and average rider's weight. I strongly recommend you just install the stem and the handlebars, and ride for awhile with the default setup. It might suit your needs! Only do the setup if you are unhappy with the default configuration.

Setup
The table in the instruction manual explains that a person of my weight riding straight handlebar bike shall keep only the single blue elastomer inside the stem chamber.

Having had the stem reside on the steerer tube:
  • Peel the warning sticker from the chamber hole
  • Using a 4 mm hex wrench, do 32 turns anti-clockwise to completely remove the preload wedge from the chamber (the bolt will stay in the wedge)
  • Using the short end of that hex wrench, pull unwanted elastomer inserts out. (Observe elastomer piece orientation and location). Insert the proper elastomer insert(s) where they should belong. (Straight handlebars require a single insert only!)
  • Depress the stem arm completely downwards and keep it that way. Insert the wedge into the bottom part of the cross inside the chamber. Re-insert the tensioning bolt and do about 32 turns clockwise (the tension will grow). Release the stem arm. Now, either use a torque wrench and tighten the bolt at 1.5-2.5 Nm, or turn the hex wrench clockwise further, keeping the short end of the wrench in your fingers (not to over-tighten the wedge).
Finish the stem/handlebars installation.

First impression
Don't think that you just depress the handlebars down, and the thing would be moving. No, that doesn't work that way; if it did, you would be suffering from constant handlebar-bob, and your ride safety would be compromised. (The stem will only move down if you depress it very strongly but please don't).

Ride impressions
RedShift Sports tell us the ShockStop stem would dampen up to 70% or road vibration. Ever had a toothache? Taken potent pain-killer? That's the ShockStop ride impression for you. You are aware the road is uneven but you don't suffer! It is like some magic worked! I'm a believer now.

Bad (and Good) Road Test

1626074968847.png

Various surfaces ridden during my test.

  • Good but uneven asphalt: The Redshift "suspension" makes the bike flow. The ride is totally cushioned.
  • Speed-bump. Accelerate to high speed and just ride over the obstacle. The experience is equivalent to riding a full suspension bike!
  • Low, nasty curb: No worries. (You will feel the hit but strongly dampened).
  • Good gravel (with minor potholes): I rode through such a segment at full speed, with the vibration still perceived but strongly dampened.
  • Washboard gravel: You just suffer far less, and certainly don't yell "Aaaaaargh!" :D (To totally dampen vibration in such terrain, you need to ride on low-inflation tyres)
  • Cracked asphalt: A pleasure to ride it!
  • Heavily damaged asphalt: the suspension mightily dampens the vibration. Just ride slower.
Summary
Although a little bit expensive, the Redshift ShockStop is an effective solution to soften your rides. Trust me. I'm a sensitive rider, and now I tend to ride onto bad surface instead of avoiding it. There is a very bad gravel road in the close neighbourhood I tried to avoid at any cost; now I choose that road as it takes me to my destinations in shorter time than any alternative route.

Be warned:
Redshift ShockStop suspension is neither a suspension fork nor the rear damper. With true Full Suspension bike, the unsprung mass is very low; the Full Suspension is meant not to make rides comfortable (although it helps a lot) but to maintain traction in rough terrain (especially off-road). Redshift will soften your rides but it won't contribute to your ride safety. (Meaning: even if you don't suffer from vibration, the uneven surface is still under the wheels of your bike; and you might unexpectedly fall; that wouldn't have rather happened to an FS bike).

I thank very much to anybody who encouraged me to try Redshift suspension. @Latitude: I've just revisited your thread on the same topic! @PowerflyLee formerly known as CheetahLee: you have been interested!
 
Last edited:

Latitude

Well-Known Member
Glad you are enjoying the Redshift stem and seatpost Stefan. I now have a working “conventional” dual suspension bike, vintage around 2000 that I have rehabilitated. I agree that while the FS bike is good on rough terrain, the Redshift equipped bike compares very favourably to it on all but the roughest conditions. Still very happy with it on my ebike!
 

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Rás Cnoic

Well-Known Member
To start with, let me say my Vado SL is a very stiff e-bike. For the first 600 km, I was suffering when riding on any uneven surface. My head was shaking, my arms were getting numb, and I was exclaiming "Oi!" because of my lower back pain when the rear wheel was meeting any pothole. Encouraged by several EBR Fora members, I decided to invest in the Redshift ShockStop suspension stem and seatpost. To make absolutely sure I made a good investment in these expensive bike parts, I rode for 18 km of very bad local roads at varying speed (from very slow to very fast).

Redshift ShockStop Seatpost

Unboxing
The seatpost comes in an elegant cardboard box. There also is an additional "inner" spring and a detailed instruction manual there.

Installation & Setup
The seatpost is almost ready to be used. The only thing you need to do is to rotate the Preload Adjustment Plug at the bottom of the post to the correct preload position (listed in a table of the instruction manual) appropriate for your weight (the preload position was #3 in my case).
The only circumstance under which you would need to unscrew the plug totally is the case you are a heavy person (over 90 and up to 110 kg that is 200-240 lb) or your riding style requires firmer suspension. In such case, prepare yourself for some mess, as the internals of the seatpost are generously greased. (You would need to remove the internals, insert the additional inner spring inside the main spring, and reassemble the whole thing in reverse order, possibly adding more grease).

After that, you install the seatpost and the saddle as if it just were a regular seatpost with one exception. The chamber holding the saddle-mount bolts is covered with a "fender" that is held in place magnetically (and is secured by a rubber band). You need to pull the bottom of the fender, take it out completely, and then you get the access to the bolts and are able to install the saddle.

View attachment 93013
The fender removed and re-attached.

Ride Comfort

Not very much to write about. The RedShift ShockStop seatpost is such an excellent product your back will be certainly relieved 100%. There was no surface I rode where I could feel any vibration except one dramatically deep pothole; even that didn't make me yell!

Comparing Redshift ShockStop to Cirrus Cycles Kinekt 2.1 suspension seatpost

These two seatposts are equal in performance. The only difference is, I'm getting a little pedal-bob at high cadence with the Kinekt while I experience no pedal-bob with the ShockStop whatsoever (perhaps I should increase the preload on the Kinekt).

View attachment 93014

Redshift ShockStop Stem

Application, sizes
The Redshift ShockStop Stem is suitable for:
  • All types of bikes equipped with the rigid fork, and
  • 1-1/8" A-HEAD steerer tube, and
  • Drop bars or straight handlebars, and
  • For all road types (paved or unpaved), but it is unsuitable for:
  • Any bike equipped with any existing form of front suspension, or
  • Any bike equipped with curved handlebars, or
  • Riding off-road.
The stem comes in sizes:
  • +/- 6 degrees: 80, 90, 100, 110, or 120 mm length, or
  • +30 degrees: 100 mm length only.
Unboxing
The cardboard box includes the stem, a set of colour-coded elastomer inserts, and a detailed instruction manual. The access hole to the internals is covered with a warning sticker.

Disclaimer: Please read the instruction manual in depth, follow instructions to an iota, and watch YouTube tutorial on the stem installation, and -- specifically -- during the setup. Not following the instruction may cause your expensive stem be damaged, rendered unusable, and the warranty doesn't cover such kind of damage.

Installation
The installation itself is done exactly as for any other A-HEAD stem (the setup is another thing!) Observe:
  • You have to insert the stem onto the steerer tube prior to any further action (you can secure it lightly with its bolts)
  • Never -- I say never -- try to unscrew the pivot of the stem, or you're going to damage the part.
  • During the setup, you have to keep the stem arm depressed down when re-inserting and tightening the preload bolt, or you may destroy the thing.
The ShockStop stem comes with two elastomer inserts inside that are preloaded and meant for drop handlebars and average rider's weight. I strongly recommend you just install the stem and the handlebars, and ride for awhile with the default setup. It might suit your needs! Only do the setup if you are unhappy with the default configuration.

Setup
The table in the instruction manual explains that a person of my weight riding straight handlebar bike shall keep only the single blue elastomer inside the stem chamber.

Having had the stem reside on the steerer tube:
  • Peel the warning sticker from the chamber hole
  • Using a 4 mm hex wrench, do 32 turns anti-clockwise to completely remove the preload wedge from the chamber (the bolt will stay in the wedge)
  • Using the short end of that hex wrench, pull unwanted elastomer inserts out. (Observe elastomer piece orientation and location). Insert the proper elastomer insert(s) where they should belong. (Straight handlebars require a single insert only!)
  • Depress the stem arm completely downwards and keep it that way. Insert the wedge into the bottom part of the cross inside the chamber. Re-insert the tensioning bolt and do about 32 turns clockwise (the tension will grow). Release the stem arm. Now, either use a torque wrench and tighten the bolt at 1.5-2.5 Nm, or turn the hex wrench clockwise further, keeping the short end of the wrench in your fingers (not to over-tighten the wedge).
Finish the stem/handlebars installation.

First impression
Don't think that you just depress the handlebars down, and the thing would be moving. No, that doesn't work that way; if it did, you would be suffering from constant handlebar-bob, and your ride safety would be compromised. (The stem will only move down if you depress it very strongly but please don't).

Ride impressions
RedShift Sports tell us the ShockStop stem would dampen up to 70% or road vibration. Ever had a toothache? Taken potent pain-killer? That's the ShockStop ride impression for you. You are aware the road is uneven but you don't suffer! It is like some magic worked! I'm a believer now.

Bad (and Good) Road Test

View attachment 93015
Various surfaces ridden during my test.

  • Good but uneven asphalt: The Redshift "suspension" makes the bike flow. The ride is totally cushioned.
  • Speed-bump. Accelerate to high speed and just ride over the obstacle. The experience is equivalent to riding a full suspension bike!
  • Low, nasty curb: No worries. (You will feel the hit but strongly dampened).
  • Good gravel (with minor potholes): I rode through such a segment at full speed, with the vibration still perceived but strongly dampened.
  • Washboard gravel: You just suffer far less, and certainly don't yell "Aaaaaargh!" :D (To totally dampen vibration in such terrain, you need to ride on low-inflation tyres)
  • Cracked asphalt: A pleasure to ride it!
  • Heavily damaged asphalt: the suspension mightily dampens the vibration. Just ride slower.
Summary
Although a little bit expensive, the Redshift ShockStop is an effective solution to soften your rides. Trust me. I'm a sensitive rider, and now I tend to ride onto bad surface instead of avoiding it. There is a very bad gravel road in the close neighbourhood I tried to avoid at any cost; now I choose that road as it takes me to my destinations in shorter time than any alternative route.

Be warned:
Redshift ShockStop suspension is neither a suspension fork nor the rear damper. With true Full Suspension bike, the unsprung mass is very low; the Full Suspension is meant not to make rides comfortable (although it helps a lot) but to maintain traction in rough terrain (especially off-road). Redshift will soften your rides but it won't contribute to your ride safety. (Meaning: even if you don't suffer from vibration, the uneven surface is still under the wheels of your bike; and you might unexpectedly fall; that wouldn't have rather happened to an FS bike).

I thank very much to anybody who encouraged me to try Redshift suspension. @Latitude: I've just revisited your thread on the same topic! @PowerflyLee formerly known as CheetahLee: you have been interested!
Thats a great & in depth review Stefan. They both look a good buy. Might have to go on the Christmas list...
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
@Stefan Mikes Hmm... When you first reported on your SL you talked about how smooth and comfortable it is and you wouldn't need a suspension post let alone a suspension stem. And now here you are as "Pan Full Suspension" :D . But I really do like the Redshift seat post and as soon as she saw it, I had to get one for my wife's Trek e-bike. Then, since I also have some back problems, I got one for my Crosstrail hybrid. And when I eventually get my SL 5.0, I'll move the seat post to that bike which already comes with the FutureShock at the front.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I was mostly riding smooth asphalt at that time, Doug. Then, with 600 km of experience, I realized how stiff and uncomfortable the SL 4.0 really was.

I rode for 40 miles today, and that included asphalt (cracked as well), paving blocks, gravel (also very damaged), forest fire-roads, and MTB single-track in addition to that :) Trust me: I came back home smiling. No usual post-ride aches! Redshift ShockStop is indeed a good solution.

Your SL 5.0 will come with FutureShock and I believe it is a well-thought solution too.

1626198824679.png

I climbed a steep hill over tree-roots today. I could not believe I made it! (SL Turbo mode, granny gear, and hard pedalling). I almost stood up on pedals but eventually never left the seat! :)
 
Last edited:

Mike_V

Active Member
Nice review,
Stefan thanks for your writing effort and your opinions and honest logical criticism with which you 'stir the EBR pot'. ( Maybe overboil )
I'm glad you like your eBike and write about it, as well as other "funny contraptions".
Mike
 

Al P

Well-Known Member
Good review, Stefan. I have been riding with the Shock Stop seatpost on both of my bikes for about two years now. They work really well. If the seatpost is all the way down, the fender, or screw cover, will pop off when you hit a bump. Eventually the rubber band breaks and the cover is gone. No big deal as it is there mostly for looks.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
My rubber retainer broke as well, but the cover stayed attached. I replaced the retainer with a thin rubber o-ring from a plumbing source… I think that’s likely what the original is. Just have to take the seat off to install the new one.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
My one criticism of the post is that I find the seat clamp difficult to work with, especially after installing three of them and dealing with it each time. The bolts are at odd angles and it's hard to get a key on it and give it more than about 1/4 turn at a time. Also, this may be partly due to my particular saddles, but to get the saddle level I had to tilt the clamp almost all the way up in the front. At the "midpoint" of the angle adjustment, the nose would have been sloping sharply downward. Since this was on three entirely different bikes, it doesn't seem like this would have anything to do with the bike having an unusual seat tube angle either.

And by the way, my retainer also broke and I think I replaced it with a loosely-connected tie-wrap; less likely to break.