Removing battery when transporting

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills MI
When my wife got her Verve+ step-thru in 2019, the dealer and/or the user manual said to remove the battery when transporting the bike on a rack. She always does this, although it never made any sense to me since any rain or dust when traveling is going to get down into the battery contacts, etc. My Specialized e-bike certainly doesn't require this.

So is this really necessary? All I can think of is that they're afraid that the battery could become unlatched and fall off -- is this likely?
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Its not unheard of, so the best practice I have always heard echoed across all ebikes is to pull the battery off the bike when transporting. I do it myself as part of removing as much weight as possible from the rack. I also remove my panniers so they aren't drogue chutes.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
If both you and your rack can handle the extra weight, leave the battery on.

I always remove mine though, primarily for weight reduction. If the bike were to be stolen off the rack, at least the thief won't get the battery too.

If you're worried about water & debris getting into the contacts it should be possible to make a cover. I sculpted a piece of Styrofoam to cover mine.
 

Tyson

Member
I started out removing mine, but it became a pain. So now I only do it for long trips. My racks can hold the weight, and I figure the bike can handle the weight of me and the battery it can handle the battery and not me.

For Bosch:
Bosch Battery Contact Pin Cover - BDU2XX, BDU3XX, BDU4XX

This will cover either the bike contact end or the charger end. So buy 2, so you have a cover for your charger plug and also for your bike when the battery is removed. Honestly I don't know why at least one of these wasn't included with the bike.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I do this every time because it makes the bike lighter/easier to lift, reduces weight stress in the ebike and bike rack, and removes the chance your battery may come loose and fall into the road at high speed. Plus, it may reduce the desire to steal the bike.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
I started out removing mine, but it became a pain
There is a caveat. Hailong Shark cases have slots in the base they can easily corrode. Riders that never remove and check contacts have the most problems. The connection should be checked often and for best practice treated with ACF50 or Boeshield.

ALL frame-mounted batteries should be on a routine maintenance schedule to confirm good contacts.

The results of poor maintenance can be disturbing and damaging.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
If both you and your rack can handle the extra weight, leave the battery on.
I have never read posts from you that I find, well, just not accurate. Removing the battery in my experience with customers is the best practice. I left mine on and got caught in a rainstorm. Water found every weak spot in the system. The second time I got caught with bikes on the rack connections had been treated with AC50, and black Rtv worked into every cranny saved the day.

SO, bottom line, IMO, properly prepped all systems are go.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills MI
I started out removing mine, but it became a pain. So now I only do it for long trips. My racks can hold the weight, and I figure the bike can handle the weight of me and the battery it can handle the battery and not me.

For Bosch:
Bosch Battery Contact Pin Cover - BDU2XX, BDU3XX, BDU4XX

This will cover either the bike contact end or the charger end. So buy 2, so you have a cover for your charger plug and also for your bike when the battery is removed. Honestly I don't know why at least one of these wasn't included with the bike.
@Tyson What are the differences among those three part numbers?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
I do this every time because it makes the bike lighter/easier to lift, reduces weight stress in the ebike and bike rack, and removes the chance your battery may come loose and fall into the road at high speed. Plus, it may reduce the desire to steal the bike.
What he said.
 

Tyson

Member
@Tyson What are the differences among those three part numbers?
If you search this you will find this is the title for the same part number. I am guessing maybe this indicates 2nd generation, then 3rd generation, then 4th generation ... and they all used the same connector so you have this series of numbers. I was confused too initially. You will find many reputable online sellers selling for $3 to $4 each plus shipping, so I just bought 3 since I want 2 in use and I am pretty sure I am going to lose one.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Thanks for calling me out on this. I should have qualified my statement about leaving the battery on.

I meet many people in trailhead parking lots. Quite a few drive a fairly short distance from their garage to the place where they plan to ride and elect to leave their batteries on during transport.

For longer trips, especially in bad weather, removing the battery is always a good practice.

Some bike makers use a semi integrated battery which is difficult to remove. It is always a good idea to check with the manufacturer as to what they recommend during transport.
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
Just checked with Kona. My Dew-e dl has a removable but integrated battery and they told me to leave it on. The battery isn't that hard to remove but it leaves a lot of stuff exposed.