Repairs after 10,000kms

Cyklefanatic

Well-Known Member
I just passed 10,000km on my 2020 Vado 4.0 and thought it would be good to report my cost of ownership so far. I am a commuter and recreational rider that rides on asphalt or concrete. I never ride dirt or gravel. I ride mostly in eco mode but on hills I increase assist just for the hill. I try to be careful when shifting to not overload the drivetrain.
Repairs so far. Two spokes. A few weeks after the first two spoke broke two more broke and after a bit of negotiations with Specialized they replaced the rear rim and spokes under warranty.
The only other problem was that the battery would fall out while riding. My LBS tried to fix it under warranty but gave up. I ended up making my own custom battery shim and fixed the problem for good myself.
I did a few custom additions. I replaced the suspension fork for a rigid fork because I don’t weigh enough to make the factory fork move. I am very happy with the rigid fork. Better handling and less weight.
I added a rear view mirror so that I could keep an eye on traffic. I added a Kinect seat post to increase comfort. I also added a rear bag that fits the factory rack mounting. At 4,500k I installed a Planet3 speed derestrictor so that I could ride faster when needed. It works fine but I don’t ride fast very often, usually only on down hill sections. I removed it recently and it is not showing any signs of wear. I now use the Blevo app to track my rides and correct my milage readings.
At 10,000k both tires are worn out so I have ordered replacements. I had one flat on the rear tire recently.
At 8,000k my LBS said my chain and rear cassette were worn. They asked me how the bike is shifting and I told them perfectly. It never misses a shift. So they told me to keep riding on the chain until it starts to miss shifts then get the chain and cassette replaced. I am somewhat lazy about chain maintenance and only clean and oil it every700k or so. I expect to get a few thousand more km out of the chain. When I do replace it I may go to a larger front cog because I never use the lower gears and always ride on the top cogs. A larger front cog will improve my chain line and should give me more chain life.
I pulled the brake pads and they look fine, probably 3/4 worn.
Battery is still going strong. I get about 85-90km on a charge. Used to be 100 when new. However I usually charge to 80%.
No motor issues. I have grown to love the quiet Brose motor.
I would say that I am very satisfied so far.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
Congrats on the long term ride report! Speaking from experience, if your drivetrain starts to miss shifts or if it clicks in gear, it's likely just a barrel adjustment to change the cable tension on your shifter as the cable stretches with wear. A worn chain will show in worn front chain ring teeth (if the the chain ring is aluminum). Severely worn chain or a stretched chain will result in the chain coming off the front chain ring when you apply pressure when starting from a standing start. A chain tension guage is a good investment to keep a better eye on the chain.
 

Cyklefanatic

Well-Known Member
Congrats on the long term ride report! Speaking from experience, if your drivetrain starts to miss shifts or if it clicks in gear, it's likely just a barrel adjustment to change the cable tension on your shifter as the cable stretches with wear. A worn chain will show in worn front chain ring teeth (if the the chain ring is aluminum). Severely worn chain or a stretched chain will result in the chain coming off the front chain ring when you apply pressure when starting from a standing start. A chain tension guage is a good investment to keep a better eye on the chain.
If having the chain come off the front chain ring is a sign of a worn chain then my chain must be in very good condition because in 10,000km it has never come off for any reason. What I take from this is that the way I ride doesn’t stress the components too much and that can greatly extend their life. If I were to always ride on dirt or gravel and use more battery assist I am sure all kinds of wear would be the result. Like the Eagles sang a long time ago,
Take it easy
Take it easy
Don't let the sound of your own wheels
Drive you crazy
Lighten up while you still can
Don't even try to understand
Just find a place to make your stand
And take it easy
 
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Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
If having the chain come off the front chain ring is a sign of a worn chain then my chain must be in very good condition because in 10,000km it has never come off for any reason.
Part ways true. The first indicator for a worn chain is checking for chain stretch with the appropriate tool. I did not do this. And at 11,000 miles (17,703km), I got very familiar with the chain coming off the front chain ring when applying light pedal pressure in taking off, pedaling. My issue was very clear once I really took a look at the front chain ring teeth. The photo attached will show you what happens when you ride long term on a stretched chain (with an aluminum front chain ring); it will wear the front chainring teeth down to the point where the chain ring becomes a weapon that requires registering with local law enforcement.... 🤣

Spot on about having a light touch on the pedals, thus easing wear on the drive train. This is my philosophy as well. I'm constantly shifting to ease the tension on the drive train. A nice offshoot to this is extended battery range on your ride. The bulk of my own miles are on asphalt.

I'm constantly relubing my chain links. Frequency: about every other ride. This time also allows me to do a good look over of the bike to catch anything developing; ie, a loose bolt here or there.....

100_4668.JPG

Original FSA front chain ring in the background, brand new one used as comparison to show teeth wear. Caused by excessive chain stretch (not replacing chain for 11,000 miles). Lubed religously for every other ride; my chain lube of choice was first Boeshield T-10 and later, Dupont Chain Saver Lube.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Part ways true. The first indicator for a worn chain is checking for chain stretch with the appropriate tool. I did not do this. And at 11,000 miles (17,703km), I got very familiar with the chain coming off the front chain ring when applying light pedal pressure in taking off, pedaling. My issue was very clear once I really took a look at the front chain ring teeth. The photo attached will show you what happens when you ride long term on a stretched chain (with an aluminum front chain ring); it will wear the front chainring teeth down to the point where the chain ring becomes a weapon that requires registering with local law enforcement.... 🤣

Spot on about having a light touch on the pedals, thus easing wear on the drive train. This is my philosophy as well. I'm constantly shifting to ease the tension on the drive train. A nice offshoot to this is extended battery range on your ride. The bulk of my own miles are on asphalt.

I'm constantly relubing my chain links. Frequency: about every other ride. This time also allows me to do a good look over of the bike to catch anything developing; ie, a loose bolt here or there.....


Original FSA front chain ring in the background, brand new one used as comparison to show teeth wear. Caused by excessive chain stretch (not replacing chain for 11,000 miles). Lubed religously for every other ride; my chain lube of choice was first Boeshield T-10 and later, Dupont Chain Saver Lube.
man thats some wear. on my bosch 18t chainring i could not see any wear but it was rumbling and jammed twice at almost 12k. but sicne its a geared drive thats about 30,000 miles but is also hardened steel.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
man thats some wear. on my bosch 18t chainring i could not see any wear but it was rumbling and jammed twice at almost 12k. but sicne its a geared drive thats about 30,000 miles but is also hardened steel.
Why front chain rings in most applications aren't forged steel is beyond me.