Resale value of ebikes

jkchang82

Member
I was curious what everyone's expected resale value is on ebikes. It's still a fairly new market in the States and as someone who is looking to sell his for a new one, I can't help but to wonder.

These bikes aren't cheap (even for the entry-level ones), and there are only so many reputable brands out there, and I recently posted mine up on CL with the hopes that I can get about 2/3 of the cost back (I bought mine for 1,600) and while I've only received one response, it was for half the price.

I realize there's no brand recognition on my bike but it still sells for a handful so just wanted everyone's opinion. I also realize newer, cheaper ones are coming out which makes it hard.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I was curious what everyone's expected resale value is on ebikes. It's still a fairly new market in the States and as someone who is looking to sell his for a new one, I can't help but to wonder.

These bikes aren't cheap (even for the entry-level ones), and there are only so many reputable brands out there, and I recently posted mine up on CL with the hopes that I can get about 2/3 of the cost back (I bought mine for 1,600) and while I've only received one response, it was for half the price.

I realize there's no brand recognition on my bike but it still sells for a handful so just wanted everyone's opinion. I also realize newer, cheaper ones are coming out which makes it hard.
I’m really under the opinion they will have zero resale value. The buyer would have to assume it will need a new battery pack, new brakes, new cassette, and new chain. All that and no guarantee. Better to buy a new bike at off season pricing.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
The problem you run into is that with parts like the motor, controller, and most especially the battery their conditions are not easy to evaluate.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I would say 350-475$ max. For a “1600$” bike.
The last price is the made up price of the big conglomerate(factory-dealer- local dealer)after 2 or 3 of 25% mark ups , that You as a customer agreed to pay.

The real price of 75% off is what is the actual value for someone who NEEDS a good used ebike and doesn not WANT one with new price tag.
And here in America there is a BIG supply of everything , so the price will always drop for used stuff..
Plus is 40$/hour for an ebike labour mechanic.
-battery 600$
-and many other much mo” expensive parts then a regular bike.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
I think if you can get half of retail for a used bike that isn't a name-brand with local bricks-and-mortar support, that would be pretty good.

There are lots of folks out there with broken down ebikes that they can't fix or get fixed, so an ebike can be a risky thing to buy even if it is new, if the maker doesn't have strong after-market support.

Since you are looking to sell to get a new bike, why not ride your old one and get all of the value out of it? Your new bike will be even better for the wait. :)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I think A LOT of this decision will lay in how handy you are. If you're not handy at all (and not interested in learning) my best guess is you need to be looking for a bike with a warranty. With new bikes available so reasonably, it's hard to justify looking at bikes that might be up for a 500 battery the first year of ownership.
 

DavidBer

Member
If you think it will hold immense resale value, you are wrong. If you think it has no resale value, you are wrong. This is the classic demand equation. It is worth what someone is willing to pay for it and you are willing to sell it for. You can ask as much as you want, but if no one is offering, you are priced to high.

Perhaps I am naive, but people tend to bitch about batteries big time. If I were buying, I'd do some sort of deal where myself and the seller went on a 20 mile ride. I'd see the degradation of the battery. But to assume a one year old battery is now useless is just idiotic. The entire e-bike industry would collapse if batteries lasted one year. No one would buy a bike knowing that every year they need to spend 400 and up to replace the battery.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
Mike, when you sell a used a bike in your shop do you provide any type of warranty or service package with the bike?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
If you think it will hold immense resale value, you are wrong. If you think it has no resale value, you are wrong. This is the classic demand equation. It is worth what someone is willing to pay for it and you are willing to sell it for. You can ask as much as you want, but if no one is offering, you are priced to high.

Perhaps I am naive, but people tend to bitch about batteries big time. If I were buying, I'd do some sort of deal where myself and the seller went on a 20 mile ride. I'd see the degradation of the battery. But to assume a one year old battery is now useless is just idiotic. The entire e-bike industry would collapse if batteries lasted one year. No one would buy a bike knowing that every year they need to spend 400 and up to replace the battery.
How many used eBikes have you sold?
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Perhaps I am naive, but people tend to bitch about batteries big time. If I were buying, I'd do some sort of deal where myself and the seller went on a 20 mile ride.
Yes, it's difficult for buyers to realize their eBike just lost over half of the purchase price in a year. Used batteries are a huge issue. If you watch forums sale threads you'll quickly see how difficult selling a battery is. Look around, even those $5000 eBikes get huge discounts on previous years models. Until shops and users have battery testing gear, it's all a guessing game.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Bicycles in general have terrible rsale value though. It doesn't matter if it's electric or not. It doesn't matter if it's a brand name like specialized or trek, or some kind of Walmart bike. They all depreciate super fast.
 

AlanDB

Well-Known Member
Bicycles in general have terrible rsale value though. It doesn't matter if it's electric or not. It doesn't matter if it's a brand name like specialized or trek, or some kind of Walmart bike. They all depreciate super fast.
And how! I just saw 3 bikes that had been dumped into a local dumpster. I took a quick look at them and they all looked to be in perfectly good condition, complete with tires. I bet you could have pulled any one of them out of the dumpster, pumped up the tires and ridden it away. I suspect someone was moving and didn't want to deal with them. I know our local charities and consignments won't take them.
 

Gkk2001

New Member
I have observed the same , ditto, ditto. The few Trek Commuter 8s bikes sold used have been discounted from 40 to 50% off MSRP. ~1 yr bikes. That is a premium bike but I think you loose 25 % or more out the door for any ebike from new. Any buyer of a used bike takes a big risk if the bike is not heavily discounted. This issue has me stalling before buying any ebike.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
And how! I just saw 3 bikes that had been dumped into a local dumpster. I took a quick look at them and they all looked to be in perfectly good condition, complete with tires. I bet you could have pulled any one of them out of the dumpster, pumped up the tires and ridden it away. I suspect someone was moving and didn't want to deal with them. I know our local charities and consignments won't take them.
We have a bike co op in Peoria. They rehab old bikes, teach kids how to rehab old bikes, and have a huge collection of parts that they sell for peanuts. Those folks do a wonderful service for the community!
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Do people actually prefer DIY project ebike than something that's built from manufacture?
I think there are good reasons why it can be done either way. I've gone the "kit" route, that resulted in a very successful bike that sold for about what I had into it. And another that I still own that's ridden by the wife - who won't let me sell it. Would I recommend the process to just anyone? No, not hardly.

There's a lot of homework that needs to be done that will allow you to properly source the parts for starters. I'm thinking that process alone will be where a lot of people will abandon thoughts of building their own.

MANY people would be absolutely horrified with the lack of support (pre and post sale) and warranty on a DIY project as well......

One needs a certain confidence in their abilities to make the jump/decision to build a kit bike. A place to work on it helps as well. I'm not sure I would have attempted the project if the only place I had to work was a 3rd floor balcony for instance!
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Nearly everybody has an experince with a prematurely dead battery in a phone, power tool, blah blah. E-bikes have batteries. I might pay $50 for a used one that had special features I wanted. Not any more. It would have to have the kind of battery they are selling now, and be compatible with generic batteries, not some obsolete thing like 36 v, brand only connector, or lead acid cells.
Salvation Army here resells bikes for $40-80. I've gotten several there, until I decided I want the something special shown left.
Pity no charity shop sells bikes in most towns. I had to walk to the Monument from Grand Junction Co because the tourist bus was not running Thanksgiving week. Excuse me for not following the herd.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Off topic: Wow, Indianjo, that's like 4-8 miles or more, depending on where you started in Grand Junction. Really liked Monument. Seen it twice.

On Topic: I paid about $1300 for my wife's bike and a year later, the shop was selling their demo model for $800 with a year guarantee on the battery. I built my first kit bike after reviewing my wife's bike and deciding it was fairly simple. That cost me under $500 for a 500W hub motor and 36V10AH battery. It still ambles along after 4 summers. .

I don't like selling stuff. Either give it to relatives or push it out to the curb.










.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Off topic: Wow, Indianjo, that's like 4-8 miles or more, depending on where you started in Grand Junction. Really liked Monument. Seen it twice.

On Topic: I paid about $1300 for my wife's bike and a year later, the shop was selling their demo model for $800 with a year guarantee on the battery. I built my first kit bike after reviewing my wife's bike and deciding it was fairly simple. That cost me under $500 for a 500W hub motor and 36V10AH battery. It still ambles along after 4 summers. .

I don't like selling stuff. Either give it to relatives or push it out to the curb.










.
Despite the price advantage, most people do not want a DIY ebike, or even if it's a professionally converted ebike.

I now remember when I was shopping around for ebikes, some ebike stores did sell the conversion kit, in case customers want to use their old bicycle as a donor bike and let the shop install the kit for them.

Believe or not, the ebike store owner said that most people want a straight up ebike, not a converted bicycle. He said he will happily install the kit for customers, but most people would rather have an ebike from factory.
 
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