Retro fit ebikes - parts for cognitive and physical disabilities.

JRA

Well-Known Member
My son is a quad and we got this for him last year from Davinci Mobility. The power source is an EU spec Bafang BBS01.
IMG_3851.PNG


He loves it as his girlfriend can barely keep up!

Disabilities are all over the map so it really depends on what your goal is.

Hub motors are cheap and might work for a lot of people.
 

irenewg13

Active Member
8
My son is a quad and we got this for him last year from Davinci Mobility. The power source is an EU spec Bafang BBS01.
View attachment 16767

He loves it as his girlfriend can barely keep up!

Disabilities are all over the map so it really depends on what your goal is.

Hub motors are cheap and might work for a lot of people.


Thanks for your reply!
The UK seems to have quite a few sites. I have found ebike sites, but not parts to retro fit an existing ebike. I was pleased to find so many manufacturers who are making bikes for children and adults, who have a broad range of disabilities.
Awesome that your son has that bike.

I have injured many ligaments in 1 hand, and have lousey thumbs. I also injured my elbow last fall, and it is slow to heal.
Sooo, my interest is primarily in modifications for hands: handlebars, grips, shifting, etc..

Happy trails,
Irene
 

irenewg13

Active Member
8


Thanks for your reply!
The UK seems to have quite a few sites. I have found ebike sites, but not parts to retro fit an existing ebike. I was pleased to find so many manufacturers who are making bikes for children and adults, who have a broad range of disabilities.
Awesome that your son has that bike.

I have injured many ligaments in 1 hand, and have lousey thumbs. I also injured my elbow last fall, and it is slow to heal.
Sooo, my interest is primarily in modifications for hands: handlebars, grips, shifting, etc..

Happy trails,
Irene


I hope that others post as many ebikes and parts that they are aware of. There are many people in the forum, who are interested in info for many types of injuries, and disabilities.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
As I indicated the range of disabilities is vast. Putting out a general call will hopefully get some results but chances are that any of them will fit your particular needs is slim.

It sounds like your needs are based more on your upper body/hands and arms. My first thought would be that for a regular type bike you would want to focus on getting as much pressure off your upper extremities as possible and still be able to maintain control. But not knowing what type of bike you already have and want to adapt to or what you may be looking to purchase it is hard to pin point what you might require. If you are looking to get a whole new bike I would suggest some sort of recumbent as they allow for the least amount of pressure on your hands and arms.
 

irenewg13

Active Member
Anyone know of any sources, ebike specific?
Thanks
Irene


Some Sites, re modifications and ebikes for people with disabilities:

http://disabledgear.com/pages/cycling-for-all-adaptions-special-needs




I hope that others post as many ebikes and parts that they are aware of. There are many people in the forum, who are interested in info for many types of injuries, and disabilities.

Sites addressing disabilities:

http://disabledgear.com/pages/cycling-for-all-adaptions-special-needs

http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/adaptive-sports-people-with-disabilities

http://www.ergon-bike.com/en/index.html

Using this search term:
"disabilities, parts and ebike",
Go to page 2:
scroll to bottom of yhe page, for a variety of searches that address disability and biking. (physical and cognitive)
 

irenewg13

Active Member
As I indicated the range of disabilities is vast. Putting out a general call will hopefully get some results but chances are that any of them will fit your particular needs is slim.

It sounds like your needs are based more on your upper body/hands and arms. My first thought would be that for a regular type bike you would want to focus on getting as much pressure off your upper extremities as possible and still be able to maintain control. But not knowing what type of bike you already have and want to adapt to or what you may be looking to purchase it is hard to pin point what you might require. If you are looking to get a whole new bike I would suggest some sort of recumbent as they allow for the least amount of pressure on your hands and arms.
As I indicated the range of disabilities is vast. Putting out a general call will hopefully get some results but chances are that any of them will fit your particular needs is slim.

It sounds like your needs are based more on your upper body/hands and arms. My first thought would be that for a regular type bike you would want to focus on getting as much pressure off your upper extremities as possible and still be able to maintain control. But not knowing what type of bike you already have and want to adapt to or what you may be looking to purchase it is hard to pin point what you might require. If you are looking to get a whole new bike I would suggest some sort of recumbent as they allow for the least amount of pressure on your hands and arms.


Hi

I have a Pedego 24", thought that I had added it.
Thumb shifting is a problem for many people, and, grasping the grip.
There are many modifications for traditional bikes, and motorcycles. I know that various ebike manufactures have button shifters, etc.. But, many of us already have enikes and don't want to buy new bikes.

I don't know the technology to understand which available parts on the market, can be appropriately used on another ebike. This is a big part of the issue,

Thanks
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
In looking at your bike online I see that it has a thumb shifter that is the lever type above the bar? If so that is what I was going to suggest because you can operate that type without actually using your thumb with the palm of your hand? Otherwise the under bar levers type shifters really preclude that you use your thumbs to operate them. The only other option is to go to an electronic type shifting system like the Shimano Di2 which is quite expensive. If you did go that route I would recommend going to the Alfine 8 spd internal hub also.

As far as grasping the grip goes they make grips that have a flat section like this

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 11.53.17 AM.png


which gives more support to your palm and might allow for a better grip overall. Or you could perhaps run them with the protrusion facing forward and be able to wrap your fingers around them?

It looks like the handlebars on your type of bike in the picture online are pretty high above the saddle height and that is what I was alluding to about getting the pressure off your hands. The lower they are in relation to your saddle height the more weight your upper body will distribute there.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Re: Ergon Grips, the image above is the Ergon GP1 grips for flat bars, Irene's Pedego has swept back cruiser bars for which the Ergon GC1 grips are designed with a more prominent forward curve.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
They come in both long and short variants, or a mix of the two so you could have a long grip on the left and a shorter grip compatible with twist shifter or throttle on the right.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 
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Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
For folks living in relatively flat areas there is no need for gears. A hub motor will run just fine, I have a 1000W direct drive on a Trek Pure 3nspeed with a simple PAS system. I never shift. Pedaling at higher speed has no resistance on my legs. I seldom use the throttle and find that even with several disabled legs the movement really helps build the strength I have left. If I were in a hilly area I'd simply go to a geared hub drive. I also ride my BBSHD as a single speed most of the time. It's my get out in traffic fastest bike. I "clown pedal", I'm making the movements with no resistance.