Review: New LMT'D - new owner's perspective

Lumpydog

Active Member
I received my LMT'D on Monday. I'll post my experience here over time and answer any questions as I can. I'll start with my experience ordering/receiving and cover the assembly process. I'll add updates on what it's like to ride as I get out and use it.

Quick background on me - because it provides context. This is my first ebike. You can read in the "New LMT'd - who's in" post about why I chose the bike. I'm 52 years old. I'm 5'10" and 180lbs. I bought the bike to get around my small town, which is very congested traffic-wise but distance-wise, everything is close and is more or less bike friendly. It's often easier to get around by bike and I live by the ocean so biking vs driving is a major upgrade.

I ordered the bike within the first day of it becoming available on May 28th and received my order confirmation with a projected shipping date of early June. On June 5th I received an email saying the bike would ship June ~10th. So far so good! But, June 10, 11 and 12 came and went with no update on shipping/tracking, while others that ordered their bikes well after me received tracking details. I reached out to Ride1Up to ask what was up - and they were honest that there was a mixup. Some early orders got skipped in error. The net-net of it was, I received my bike one business day later than I would have - a Monday instead of a Friday on the East Coast. I point this out because Ride1Up is a small company that is growing fast. You get a very competitive product at a MUCH lower price - expect to trade that off with a little bit of patience and flexibility.

The bike arrived and I inspected the box for damage. It was intact with a few superficial marks but no punctures or signs of abuse. The package comes with one external strap to keep the box together. My opinion - they could use two - the side with no strap had the bottom flap beginning to give way.

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Opening the box, and pulling the bike out by myself was pretty easy. The bike was well protected. On initial inspection, no damage incurred during travel. As I unpacked it, I couldn't find any damage/marks. Awesome.

Fit/finish - the bike was perfect out of the box. Two other boxes contained the charger and pedals/bottle holder/reflectors. I’ll point out that the online pictures make the bike color look almost tan - in person it’s a light mat gray.

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The bike came with no tools. I think that's fine and frankly did not expect it. But - here is what I would recommend having on hand when you receive your LMT'D:

- Allen wrench set - from memory I needed a 3, 4, 5 and 6 mm sized Allen wrench. You can use a very basic Allen wrench set from your local hardware store but I'd recommend getting this torque wrench set if you're not going to get your local bike shop (LBS) to assemble.
- Wire cutters or robust scissors - to cut all the cable ties.
- An adjustable wrench - or set of spanner wrenches (for the pedals)
- Screw driver - Phillips or Slot - for the reflectors
- Acetone or brake cleaner or rubbing alcohol to clean the brake rotors.
- A clean rag or two
- Bike/air pump

The instruction manual needs a little updating - it appears to be the 700 or 500 series instruction manual with the front page altered to show the LMT'D - that's fine and most of the instructions still apply - but the listed torque settings all conflict with the torque settings labeled on the actual bike. More about this in a bit.

I started by cutting free the front tire. Be careful not to touch the brake rotor (You don't want oil or crud on it if you can help it - it will contaminate the calipers). Then I cut the front fork and the handlebar free. Fitting the front fork into the head tube was easy. The YouTube assembly video for the 700 is a good reference. It sounds like they will be posting a LMT'D assembly video soon. Make sure the cables are routed on the left side (as you sit in the seat) of the head tube.

As mentioned, the manual seems a little "mailed in". When it comes to torque settings, there were conflicts between the manual and what was printed on the bike... Manual: "Stem/Steerer Clamp" 8-9nm. "Handlebar Clamp" 8-9nm". BUT, it was printed on the bike "5nm" and "5-7nm" respectively. I went with what was printed on the bike. Same issue with the seat clamp: Manual says single saddle clamp bolt 16-17mm but on my LMT'D there are two saddle clamp bolts marked 12nm... Again, I went with what was printed on the actual parts. Torque settings matter a lot - especially with aluminum parts. Ride1Up should update the manual or align what is printed on the parts to the manual.

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After getting the forks installed and the handlebars installed, it was time to inflate the tires. They take 30-55lbs - I put them at a 45lbs and they are plenty hard. Next I used acetone to clean off the rotors. They had a lot of oil and crud on them. Rotors need to be free of that stuff or they won't work as designed. Brake cleaner, acetone or rubbing alcohol will work. Clean the rotors off - both!

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Next, installed the front tire. Pretty easy - getting the rotor into the calipers took a little trial and error but not to hard. Then - I put tire skewer in with the pointy end of the cone springs toward the tire and the clamp opposite the rotor side. Done. Time to use the kickstand and remove/cut off the rest of the packaging (which I left on to protect the bike as I worked on assembling it). The next step was to wind the cable wrap/cable covers around the brake and throttle/display cables.

This brings me to my only real issue with the bike so far - it's not major but Ride1Up should consider addressing this in future bikes: The cables enter the frame through an oval cutout on the underside of the downtube and exit the frame near the cranks through a similar cutout on the lower underside downtube. The cutout is wide open and has no grommet or protection from the elements which poses two problems: 1) Wire and hydraulic tubes are exposed to the sharp frame edges and 2) Easy water ingress point. Problem 1 is compounded by the fact that right where the cables enter the frame - the outer cable covering ends, exposing the internal colored wires - my LMT'D came with super fragile wires hanging out and exposed to potential damage from the sharp frame edges. See the pictures below. My solution was to use the cable wrap and run it over the exposed cables and push it into the frame so they are somewhat protected, But, the hydraulic brake cable is still up against the sharp edge of the frame... that feels like a future problem/accident. Problem 2, water ingress, is going to be compounded by the lack of fenders (which I prefer) but without them, any water spray from the tires is going to go right into the frame where the electronics/controller are... no way around it. The 700 comes with a nice rubber grommet where the cables enter the frame...

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Next stop - removing the battery and getting it charging. The keys were hanging off the handlebars. Getting out the battery was as simple as turning the key. Popped right out. The battery, like the rest of the bike is beefy/substantial and feels very solid. Using the charger, the DC 2.5 port on the battery is behind a rubber cover that pops up and then rotates out of the way like the arms of a clock - don’t fold it back, rotate it. After 3-4 hours the charge indicator turned green, indicating full charge.

With the battery charging, it was time to put on the pedals, I couldn't find the marking on the pedals of left/right per the manual, but the left pedal should tighten counterclockwise and the right pedal should tighten clockwise. The pedals are actually pretty nice. I was going to replace them but they have a nice/wide base with good cleats to prevent your feet from slipping off.

Next - I installed seat/seat-post. Check. Then on to getting the display tilted properly - along with the left thumb throttle angle (mine was a little higher than I wanted). I then went over and checked the tightness of every screw/bolt. I was glad I did as some were a little loose. I found that the cap on the front shocks marked “air” was loose and needed tightening/securing.

All-in-all, a pretty easy build. Ride1Up could do a better job with the manual to make it more accurate to the specific bike. I completed my bike yesterday - and left the battery to charge overnight. This bike is really nice - way nicer than expected. I know I nit pick here/there - again, tradeoffs (and feedback for Ride1Up)! Today I installed my accessories and took it for a spin. I'll report back on the accessories soon and the ride experience once I get more miles.
 
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GenXrider

Active Member
Thanks for the initial review. I'm curious about the PAS in the 1-9 assist levels, primarily dialing in a low but noticeable assist level that still requires you to put some effort into it at around 15 mph on the flats for getting good exercise. Is there a big jump from 1 to 2 to 3 in the 9 assist setting? I had read power settings for the 500.

Also, I would like to hear how the torque sensor based assist on this bike feels or the experience in general, especially in comparison to the cadence sensor based assist of the 500 or 700.... or perhaps another bike.

Do the 2.4" tires give a smooth enough ride in gravel as to eliminate the need for a fat tire bike? I have to deal with some asphalt roads which they spread gravel on sections from time to time - really sucks on my current 35c tires.
 
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Lumpydog

Active Member
Day two:

Yesterday I test-drove my new LMT'D as stock and then added a few accessories. My ability to compare this bike to other ebikes is limited, as it is my first ebike. I've never tried a cadence sensor bike, so a torque sensor is my "normal".

I finished my last review/post saying that the LMT'D was nicer than I expected - that continues day 2.

Bike:

- It's heavy. I carried it up/down the 6 steps to my house as I test drove it and carried it back inside to make adjustments. 51 lbs is not trivial - even as a very light e-bike. It's not unreasonable, but it's enough weight to make you pay close attention to your footing.

- It's a chameleon. It is gray? tan? beige? Depends on who you ask and the sunlight. Looked gray inside. Looks beige to me sometimes.

- I really like the included components. The pedals, the hand grips, the seat, the tires, the gear shifters, the brakes. All work well and I didn't feel like I urgently needed to upgrade anything. This may be my first ebike, but it's not my first bike. Not by a long shot.

- It includes a few things not pictured or mentioned on the website: Wheel reflectors, rear and front reflectors, a water bottle holder.

- The display is bright, small and packed with information. Color is awesome. It's a generic Luna 500c unit. I like that it is small/discreet. It has haptic feedback (vibrates). My only negative on the display is that it lacks the Ride1Up opening logo and logo at the bottom of the screen - like the early 700 units. Kinda weak. Instead it says "Hello" on startup and "intelligent" at the bottom of the screen. Missed brand reinforcement opportunity.

- Hydraulic brakes. Are really nice! This is my second disc brake-based bike. First hydraulic. Damn. There is a HUGE difference.

- Air suspension. Is even nicer!! Again, a first for me. The air suspension needs to be dialed in and adjusted to the individual. DON'T LEAVE IT AS SET FROM THE FACTORY. You and I don't weigh the same. Shocks are not "one size fits all" with regard to the factory shipped settings. Adjust the amount of air (left side) and adjust the damper (right side). Good article here. I ended up releasing some of the air to get some sag under my weight and adjusted the damper to get the right rebound. You paid for air shocks. Make them work for you.

- Torque sensing. I really like how the motor just kicks in seamlessly/smoothly/evenly on hills. WOW! BUT.... on flats - torque sensing feels weird. It comes on/off a lot and if the PAS is too high, the motor is constantly lurching/stabbing the bike forward and then shutting off. A big part of riding a torque sensor bike seems to be - adjusting your pedaling style to have more constant pedal pressure (torque) - vs the strong downward force and ease/transition at the top/bottom of the pedal circle, which seam to cause the LMT'D's motor to pulse on/off. If I turn down PAS, the on/off assist is much less noticeable but I can still hear the engine pulsing on/off. I got used to this and found a PAS setting that doesn't leave me with the sensation of a motor on/off pull sensation and, I kept my pedal pressure more even. I'm still learning - interested in other's experiences. I can get to 28 MPH pretty easily - this bike is fast.

- Throttle. Press and go. Super torquey. Easy.

- Motor. Actually a lot quieter than I expected and much more quiet than the LMT'D review videos I've seen. Weird how the motor noise seems to be amplified in videos. It feels to me to be very torquey - no problem accelerating the bike into motion - via PAS or throttle.

- Battery. I like how well it integrates into the frame. After a lot of riding, I'm at 70% charge. I've bounced over bad pot holes and curbs. Battery stays put. Same color and finish as the down tube. Nice touch.

- Derailleur/shifting. Worked nicely and was well indexed out of the box. With the motor assisting I just leave the bike in 8th speed - Weird or Normal or Lazy? The motor and its serious torque make starting/rolling from 8th gear a non issue.

- Kickstand. I read a lot of reviews complaining about how the kickstand was mounted such that the pedals got locked up on it. That's how every bike I owned as a kid worked. This is really a complaint? For f*ck's sake.

So I ordered takeout last night. I pledged to Ride1Up that I'd replace 2 driving trips per month. Time to make good on that. In my car the restaurant I ordered from is a 10 minute drive, NOT including getting in the car, starting it, backing out, parking it.... I hopped on my LMT'D and made it door-to-door in 8 minutes. I planned on 15 minutes. I was pretty shocked. I had to wait for my takeout because I arrived early. The ride back was 8 minutes again - my food was HOT when I sat down to eat it. That's not the real punch line though... the ride to and from the restaurant - outside - beautiful night - as they say... priceless. More to come.

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Lumpydog

Active Member
Thanks for the initial review. I'm curious about the PAS in the 1-9 assist levels, primarily dialing in a low but noticeable assist level that still requires you to put some effort into it at around 15 mph on the flats for getting good exercise. Is there a big jump from 1 to 2 to 3 in the 9 assist setting? I had read power settings for the 500.

Also, I would like to hear how the torque sensor based assist on this bike feels or the experience in general, especially in comparison to the cadence sensor based assist of the 500 or 700.... or perhaps another bike.

Do the 2.4" tires give a smooth enough ride in gravel as to eliminate the need for a fat tire bike? I have to deal with some asphalt roads which they spread gravel on sections from time to time - really sucks on my current 35c tires.

Right now I'm using 5 PAS levels setting. Each bump up is noticeable. Because (so far) I'm bumping up and down PAS levels as I experiment I have not tried the finer 1-9 yet. Stay tuned.

Regarding torque sensor experience - as mentioned, this is my first eBike - so I can't give you points of comparison. Hopefully my prior posts gives some understanding of a new-to-ebike torque sensor experience.

As to the tires/ride... I haven't taken the bike off pavement yet!
 

Ole1830

New Member
I also bought a LMTD as my first eBike.

Normally running 2/9 on pedal assist, I'm getting pretty decent range from mine. It's currently sitting on the charger after the second battery cycle. Last battery cycle went like this:

Sunday: 14.09 miles 16mph average, no hills of note. Start 100% end 90%.
Monday: 7.37 miles 14.5mph average including riding through a large grassy park. Start 90% end 60%
Tuesday: 13.39 miles 15.4mph average including one pretty decent hill (my gps showed 161ft total elevation gain during this ride). Start 60% end 40%
Wednesday (today) 7.94 miles 14.6mpg average same grassy park no hills to speak of otherwise. Start 40% end 20%.

I'm a pretty big guy 6'4" 270ish so I can't complain about the range I'm getting from this bike.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Just for future reference, brake cleaner and acetone are basically the same thing. I never have liked brown, or shades of it, on any vehicle with black trim, just my preference. Looks like that Lmt'd decal is crooked on the chain stay. Very minor.
 

Lumpydog

Active Member
Just for future reference, brake cleaner and acetone are basically the same thing... Looks like that Lmt'd decal is crooked on the chain stay. Very minor.

Brake cleaner and acetone are very different. I meant to add in my post, if you use brake cleaner, do it in a well ventilated space... very toxic stuff as it contains Tetrachloroethylene. Far more effective at cleaning brakes than acetone.

LMT'D decal angle is by design ;)

Not a fan of brown either!
 

CityExplorer

Well-Known Member
Great initial review. I don't think the kickstand will be an issue, but I do prefer it farther back. I think this bike was a great buy, and a really great first ebike for many, and many of those won't need a second one.
 

Lumpydog

Active Member
Ok - quick update on the torque sensor... I've seen a lot of people asking about this. I'm at about 40 miles on the bike.

I mentioned in an earlier post that the LMT'D was incredible on hills: Nice, even, consistent motor engagement and level of assist - as I pedaled up hills. BUT on flats I felt like I was taming a colt as the bike lurched/bucked forward as the motor kicked in and then slowed as the motor cut out... and then the motor kicked back in and the bike jumped.... what was wrong!? It turns out, riding a torque sensor bike has a small learning curve. At least it did for me, as I'm new to e-bikes. I'm sharing what I've learned so far - I'm interested to hear what works for others - or if I am missing anything.

My early thoughts on the LMT'D is that it has a really torquey motor - as advertised. Which is great.... BUT, the bike's torque sensor needs to "feel" you pedal vs "see" you pedal (cadence sensor) to engage the motor. Once the motor kicks in, it has enough torque/power that it's hard to keep enough pressure on the pedals for the torque sensor to keep the motor engaged... Basically a torquey engine counters your ability to provide torque input. That's really important to understand.

A few things that I've found helped:


- Set the LMT'D's pedal assist range to 1-9. The default setting for the LMT'D's has a PAS range of 1-5, which are bigger jumps/increments from lowest to highest settings. To change this to finer steps, go into the display menu's advanced settings and set the PAS levels to 1-9 - which gives you smaller/finer increases as you step from lowest to highest. Kevin covers how to change this in this Youtube video. The finer PAS adjustments/increments will help you to find the sweet spot where the motor's "on" point matches (but doesn't override) your pedal input.

- Use PAS like gears.... increase PAS to match the speed you want to go - but no more. If you want to go 15 mph and have PAS set to 9, it's going to cut in and cut out a lot as it feels you pedal, over accelerates, cuts out and waits to "feel" you pedal... Try lowering PAS to meet your speed/pedal cadence.

- Pedal in a full circle, not just up/down. What I mean by this is - keep the chain/pedal crank loaded consistently. I am (was) a power stroke pedaler... right foot, I mash the pedal down from 1:00 to 5:00 and ease from 5:00 to 1:00... Left foot, same but counterclockwise. This creates dead spots in the top and bottom of your pedal strokes. With a torque sensor, this tells the motor "turn on, turn off, turn on, turn off". I'm thinking toe clips may actually help a lot here. Keep pressure around your entire pedal stroke. It's not hard actually.

- The LMT'D's motor is powerful from a torque standpoint - which I like a lot. But, it means the motor can push the bike out from under you easily and get ahead of your pedal pressure. Use higher gears than you would expect, to help you keep pressure on the cranks and constant input to the torque sensor.

- Set the Start Poles to 0 in the advanced menu. Again, Kevin covers how to do this in the video I link to above. My understanding is the start poles setting determines how far into a pedal stroke (from stopped) the motor kicks in. The higher the number, the further into the pedal rotation it takes and delays motor start. I wanted to remove the motor on/off sensation so it made the most sense to set this to zero - start the motor immediately with my input. I pedal, the motor should kick in. Any delay just makes the bike feel disconnected from my input and makes it feel like it's bucking/out of synch. **Note - I'm not certain this setting applies to a torque sensor bike - but I set it from one (default) to zero - regardless.

Doing these things helps to balance the motor's power against your ability to input pedal torque so you can find the sweet spot where the motor's "on" point matches (but doesn't override) your pedal input.

Once you understand how the bike works and set it up properly, it's a matter of finding the settings that work for your speed preferences, your riding style and your weight. Once you sort out the balance that works for you, you won't spend a lot of time hunting around for the right PAS or gear.

More to come - so far, really enjoying this bike.
 
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Asher

Well-Known Member
Very instructive post Lumpy.

I've heard that torque sensors don't come with much calibration from the OEM, it's something the bike maker has to deal with, and it can take a lot of tuning to get it feeling right. I don't own an R, but my Juiced CCS didn't have these issues, nor did I hear about it from other Juiced owners. So it sounds like Ride's torque sensor isn't as refined in its tuning. It's also it's first ever.

I wonder if a firmware update could resolve these issues, eg if Ride can tune it post manufacturing and send out an update.

Also the custom assist levels is very cool, wish I had that on my Juiced.
 

Lumpydog

Active Member
Asher - I wondered the same about the torque sensor being new to Ride1Up and potentially needing further tuning. I believe the motor’s power modulates (increase/decrease) with more torque or less input. I could see tuning the amount of motor output against the amount of pedal torque. In this case, maybe dialing it back a bit.

Also, understand that I’m new to these bikes so some of what I experienced may have been me having PAS maxed and being in a low gear, etc. Inexperience...

it’s not something that has me second guessing my purchase. Just learning how the motor/bike responds to input.

I’d be really interested to see a side by side comparison to Juiced - from a feel perspective.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
The Juiced was my first and only ebike, aside from occasional JUMP shared ebike rides (which don't have torque sensors). The torque sensor felt pretty natural right from the start, and others say the same. So I doubt your sentiment owes to any deficiency or ignorance on your part on how to pedal properly.

I'd guess that the implementation will improve over time in later batches, and Ride didn't want to hold up shipping when everything else was ready.
 
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Lumpydog

Active Member
Asher - really helpful perspective. I appreciate it. Part of me posting my experience here was to see if my experience was "normal" and get feedback from others who have more experience than I do. It's a new bike and as you point out - R1Up's first cadence sensor...
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Asher - really helpful perspective. I appreciate it. Part of me posting my experience here was to see if my experience was "normal" and get feedback from others who have more experience than I do. It's a new bike and as you point out - R1Up's first cadence sensor...
Also, Tora Harris of Juiced has frequent videos, where he extensively test rides bikes. I'm not sure what exactly he's testing, since the frame and parts are already pretty much chosen, but I'm pretty sure the torque sensor and assist operation, is a big part of it.

Vs on a regular bike, the ride is determined by the frame shape, materials, tire/wheel combo, saddle/pedal/handlebar, which Tora has already locked down in these videos.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
After researching up on e-bikes, I was coming to a conclusion that a torque sensor bike would be better. I originally was interested in a fat bike Ripcurrent S from Juiced. But various comments on the Juiced forum started turning me off on the torque sensor.

I thought maybe the torque sensor issues were possibly specific to Juiced, but then I read comments about "jumping" when pedaling on torque sensor bikes in some situations on the Rize and Ride1UP sections of this forum.

After the negative feedback in regard to torque sensor usage, I don't look at it as an advantage anymore. Other Ride1UP bikes don't have a torque sensor, so they may be a better option for me. The 500 and 700 look pretty good.
 
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CityExplorer

Well-Known Member
Over all I would say the torque sensor on the RCS is fine, there is very occasionally some pulsing at speed, but no sudden starts. I like Cadence sensors as well if done right, and they have an advantage for people that are less fit to for other reasons cannot put lot of pressure on the pedals for the duration required for their trips. Either one takes a bit of getting suet, but first time riders will have more of an adjustment for many cheaper Cadence sensors that don't have soft power ramping controllers.

People often don't get enough time toadjust to Cadence sensors so they switch to torque, and some hub motors with Cadence sensors don't work so well in technical riding like mountain bike trails, they have a bit of a learning curve to modulate them with the break cutouts and other techniques. Some implementations without power ramping controllers can be a bit dangerous for older people with slow reaction time, or in special situations software is basic, and sometimes even if it is not.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Day two:

Yesterday I test-drove my new LMT'D as stock and then added a few accessories. My ability to compare this bike to other ebikes is limited, as it is my first ebike. I've never tried a cadence sensor bike, so a torque sensor is my "normal".

I finished my last review/post saying that the LMT'D was nicer than I expected - that continues day 2.

Bike:

- It's heavy. I carried it up/down the 6 steps to my house as I test drove it and carried it back inside to make adjustments. 51 lbs is not trivial - even as a very light e-bike. It's not unreasonable, but it's enough weight to make you pay close attention to your footing.

- It's a chameleon. It is gray? tan? beige? Depends on who you ask and the sunlight. Looked gray inside. Looks beige to me sometimes.

- I really like the included components. The pedals, the hand grips, the seat, the tires, the gear shifters, the brakes. All work well and I didn't feel like I urgently needed to upgrade anything. This may be my first ebike, but it's not my first bike. Not by a long shot.

- It includes a few things not pictured or mentioned on the website: Wheel reflectors, rear and front reflectors, a water bottle holder.

- The display is bright, small and packed with information. Color is awesome. It's a generic Luna 500c unit. I like that it is small/discreet. It has haptic feedback (vibrates). My only negative on the display is that it lacks the Ride1Up opening logo and logo at the bottom of the screen - like the early 700 units. Kinda weak. Instead it says "Hello" on startup and "intelligent" at the bottom of the screen. Missed brand reinforcement opportunity.

- Hydraulic brakes. Are really nice! This is my second disc brake-based bike. First hydraulic. Damn. There is a HUGE difference.

- Air suspension. Is even nicer!! Again, a first for me. The air suspension needs to be dialed in and adjusted to the individual. DON'T LEAVE IT AS SET FROM THE FACTORY. You and I don't weigh the same. Shocks are not "one size fits all" with regard to the factory shipped settings. Adjust the amount of air (left side) and adjust the damper (right side). Good article here. I ended up releasing some of the air to get some sag under my weight and adjusted the damper to get the right rebound. You paid for air shocks. Make them work for you.

- Torque sensing. I really like how the motor just kicks in seamlessly/smoothly/evenly on hills. WOW! BUT.... on flats - torque sensing feels weird. It comes on/off a lot and if the PAS is too high, the motor is constantly lurching/stabbing the bike forward and then shutting off. A big part of riding a torque sensor bike seems to be - adjusting your pedaling style to have more constant pedal pressure (torque) - vs the strong downward force and ease/transition at the top/bottom of the pedal circle, which seam to cause the LMT'D's motor to pulse on/off. If I turn down PAS, the on/off assist is much less noticeable but I can still hear the engine pulsing on/off. I got used to this and found a PAS setting that doesn't leave me with the sensation of a motor on/off pull sensation and, I kept my pedal pressure more even. I'm still learning - interested in other's experiences. I can get to 28 MPH pretty easily - this bike is fast.

- Throttle. Press and go. Super torquey. Easy.

- Motor. Actually a lot quieter than I expected and much more quiet than the LMT'D review videos I've seen. Weird how the motor noise seems to be amplified in videos. It feels to me to be very torquey - no problem accelerating the bike into motion - via PAS or throttle.

- Battery. I like how well it integrates into the frame. After a lot of riding, I'm at 70% charge. I've bounced over bad pot holes and curbs. Battery stays put. Same color and finish as the down tube. Nice touch.

- Derailleur/shifting. Worked nicely and was well indexed out of the box. With the motor assisting I just leave the bike in 8th speed - Weird or Normal or Lazy? The motor and its serious torque make starting/rolling from 8th gear a non issue.

- Kickstand. I read a lot of reviews complaining about how the kickstand was mounted such that the pedals got locked up on it. That's how every bike I owned as a kid worked. This is really a complaint? For f*ck's sake.

So I ordered takeout last night. I pledged to Ride1Up that I'd replace 2 driving trips per month. Time to make good on that. In my car the restaurant I ordered from is a 10 minute drive, NOT including getting in the car, starting it, backing out, parking it.... I hopped on my LMT'D and made it door-to-door in 8 minutes. I planned on 15 minutes. I was pretty shocked. I had to wait for my takeout because I arrived early. The ride back was 8 minutes again - my food was HOT when I sat down to eat it. That's not the real punch line though... the ride to and from the restaurant - outside - beautiful night - as they say... priceless. More to come.

View attachment 56637

Nice review... tell us more about your mods with the suspension seatpost and rear rack.
 
I worry about the torque sensor on this bike. I was ready to pull the trigger today, but this is giving me pause. Should I just go with the 700 instead? Decisions...
 

wings02

Active Member
Lumpydog, I too am experiencing what you discuss about the Torque sensor on the Limited. I literally noticed it as soon as I got on the bike. My post about this issue is in GENERAL discussions. My main reason of going with the Limited was the fact they offered the Torque sensing system. I would hate to be the "guinea pig" in RIDE!UP's new model introduction only to have an improved torque system in later improved LIMITED bikes.