Review of Haibike Sduro Trekking 4.0

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Here is a good review of the multipurpose commuter/mountain bike Haibike Sduro Trekking 4.0.


The bike is equipped with a nice set of accessories to get the job done. The rack is nice and strong – it is quite useful for carrying work items or even for some errands. The fenders are nice and wide, providing great protection from road debris, and the integrated lights are pretty cool. I don’t know why, but the front light has a cap on it with a magnet to secure it. I never did find out what it’s supposed to do.

Haibike uses super-moto-x tires which are some really nice tires for road use. These are some of my favorite tires, being very comfortable, reflective, and also flat resistant. Those big tires also leave room for mountain bike tires, if you wanted to take this bad boy off-road, which you totally could. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to take the bike off-road in person. I have ridden similar bikes using this motor, and have done many trips to the Utah mountains on Haibikes, so prior experience and road use will have to converge for this speculative assessment.


This bike features the Yamaha PW-ST motor, which is the next evolution in the beloved Yamaha PW lineup. The motor is a bit bulky, compared to the likes of the new Shimano or Bosch, but one great thing is the 4 sensors they use to offer what they call an automatic mode. In the ‘high’ setting on the display, this will go into a mode that will tailor the assistance based on wheel speed, pedaling speed, torque on the chain, and also tilt of the bike itself. On the road, I would call this effect subtle, but when you take it off-road, that’s where you can fully notice its effect. Given the motor capabilities, the spacing for knobby tread, and the wide handlebars, you definitely could use this bike both on and off the road.

Haibike Sduro Trekking 4.0 Tech Specs
  • Motor: Yamaha PW-ST mid-drive; “nominally” 250W
  • Battery: 36V 13.8Ah, integrated into frame
  • Range: 25-50 miles (40-80km)
  • Motor Engagement: 4 sensor pedal assist, no throttle
  • Gearing: 1×10 Speed Shimano Deore 11-42 Tooth
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Tires: 27.5 x 2.4 Schwalbe Super Moto-X
  • Price: $3,200 MSRP
  • Extras: Fenders, rear rack with rear light, front air-shock, 180mm hydraulic Shimano disc brakes, 5000-lumen integrated front light with a magnet cap
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Haibike Class 3...



 

TMH

Well-Known Member
Haibike = no class 3?
We have a couple of Trekking 7.0's (2019) with PearTune MSO mod chips. 75nm torque with no speed limiting. Make the bikes whole new animals. Bosch on the 2019 Trekking 9.0 S only made 60nm of torque.

Awesome bikes. If I could have only 1 e-bike, it would likely be the Haibike Trekking.
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
Model year 2020 foward? 4.0 is now the highest number it implied, no Flyon for Trekking either
 

TMH

Well-Known Member
Model year 2020 foward? 4.0 is now the highest number it implied, no Flyon for Trekking either
Looks like that is the highest spec they are bringing to the U.S. this year. They still have higher models (5.0, 7.0 and 8.0 Trekking) available in Europe, and then their Adventr bikes with the Flyon. Maybe those will come to the U.S. in future years?

At least with the Yamaha motor in the 4.0 you should still be able to chip it to get more speed. New Bosch motors, maybe not so much...:(
 

BlackHand

Active Member
I think Chris from Propel Bikes said even before Covid that there would be no Flyon and a limited lineup for 2020 due to the change in North America distributor.

Maybe there will be some early 2021 models?

Gen 4 Bosch would be nice and Flyon has a lot of potential.
 

BlackHand

Active Member
Here is a good review of the multipurpose commuter/mountain bike Haibike Sduro Trekking 4.0.

....
The bike is equipped with a nice set of accessories to get the job done. The rack is nice and strong – it is quite useful for carrying work items or even for some errands. The fenders are nice and wide, providing great protection from road debris, and the integrated lights are pretty cool. I don’t know why, but the front light has a cap on it with a magnet to secure it. I never did find out what it’s supposed to do.
  • Extras: Fenders, rear rack with rear light, front air-shock, 180mm hydraulic Shimano disc brakes, 5000-lumen integrated front light with a magnet cap

Correction - that's a Skybeamer 150 on the Trekking 4.0 just like the other US models. 50 lumens, not 5000 lumens like the Flyon version
 

Scwirpeo

New Member
I have this model and can confirm its perfectly functional off-road.

I got this bike to use alongside my old man's full seven 2.0 he got to get back in shape, I needed something that meet the class one trail restrictions and could go on trails reliably as that's where he wants to go most often. Additionally I wanted something that could double for my 52V DIY kit when it goes down from a bad part as it's a junker bike and parts fail regularly on it. So I decided to go hybrid and this fit the bill.

I will say 3,200 is steep for what you get but honestly it's got all the parts you really need for a trail bike with the exception of the fork and tires. Overall after 200 miles on it I think it's definitely putting in the work I got it for and all the included accessories are definitely a plus.

Just one nitpick the fork is definitely coil and without a doubt useless for most trail applications. It's decent for road stuff but I haven't used it a lot on road as everything is still in lockdown basically including where I work. It's something I will definitely be looking to swap out at some point after I grab some tires.

If anyone is curious about it I can try to answer questions if you want.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I have this model and can confirm its perfectly functional off-road.

I got this bike to use alongside my old man's full seven 2.0 he got to get back in shape, I needed something that meet the class one trail restrictions and could go on trails reliably as that's where he wants to go most often. Additionally I wanted something that could double for my 52V DIY kit when it goes down from a bad part as it's a junker bike and parts fail regularly on it. So I decided to go hybrid and this fit the bill.

I will say 3,200 is steep for what you get but honestly it's got all the parts you really need for a trail bike with the exception of the fork and tires. Overall after 200 miles on it I think it's definitely putting in the work I got it for and all the included accessories are definitely a plus. Just one nitpick the fork is definitely coil and without a doubt useless for most trail applications. It's decent for road stuff but I haven't used it a lot on road as everything is still in lockdown basically including where I work. It's something I will definitely be looking to swap out at some point after I grab some tires.

If anyone is curious about it I can try to answer questions if you want.

Welcome to EBR and thanks for posting.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
I have this model and can confirm its perfectly functional off-road.

I got this bike to use alongside my old man's full seven 2.0 he got to get back in shape, I needed something that meet the class one trail restrictions and could go on trails reliably as that's where he wants to go most often. Additionally I wanted something that could double for my 52V DIY kit when it goes down from a bad part as it's a junker bike and parts fail regularly on it. So I decided to go hybrid and this fit the bill.

I will say 3,200 is steep for what you get but honestly it's got all the parts you really need for a trail bike with the exception of the fork and tires. Overall after 200 miles on it I think it's definitely putting in the work I got it for and all the included accessories are definitely a plus.

Just one nitpick the fork is definitely coil and without a doubt useless for most trail applications. It's decent for road stuff but I haven't used it a lot on road as everything is still in lockdown basically including where I work. It's something I will definitely be looking to swap out at some point after I grab some tires.

If anyone is curious about it I can try to answer questions if you want.

Scwirpeo, welcome to EBR, from one Haibike owner to another!

I always liked their Trekking series, moreso the Bosch powered ones as they included the heavier duty Super Moto-X tires for that motor, whereas on the Yamaha's, they had skinnier tires. For this year in the US, Haibike has closed that gap with the Bosch cousins by including this bike in the lineup.

One question I have for you is that I see just like the Bosch powered Trekkings, this Yamaha powered bike has provisions for the Haibike Modular Rail System.

On the Bosch, they have as an option, the ability to use an external battery for double the range potential of the in-tube bike.

Do you know, or does anyone else know, if Haibike allows for the 500wh external battery to be used on this new Yamaha powered Trekking?
 

Scwirpeo

New Member
Scwirpeo, welcome to EBR, from one Haibike owner to another!

I always liked their Trekking series, moreso the Bosch powered ones as they included the heavier duty Super Moto-X tires for that motor, whereas on the Yamaha's, they had skinnier tires. For this year in the US, Haibike has closed that gap with the Bosch cousins by including this bike in the lineup.

One question I have for you is that I see just like the Bosch powered Trekkings, this Yamaha powered bike has provisions for the Haibike Modular Rail System.

On the Bosch, they have as an option, the ability to use an external battery for double the range potential of the in-tube bike.

Do you know, or does anyone else know, if Haibike allows for the 500wh external battery to be used on this new Yamaha powered Trekking?


As far as I can tell the range extender is exclusively for Bosch. So unfortunately you get stuck with having to swap spare batteries instead of having two connected at once.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
I just ordered a brand new 2020 HaibIke Sduro Trekking 4.0 with zero miles and new tags for $2000 for my wife. I think it's a lot of bike for that price which is a couple of hundred more than the Ride1Up Limited (hub motor) but several leagues higher in terms of quality, brand, local support, motor, and components. Hopefully I'll get it this weekend.
 
I just ordered a brand new 2020 HaibIke Sduro Trekking 4.0 with zero miles and new tags for $2000 for my wife. I think it's a lot of bike for that price which is a couple of hundred more than the Ride1Up Limited (hub motor) but several leagues higher in terms of quality, brand, local support, motor, and components. Hopefully I'll get it this weekend.

where at?
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
This is one hell of a bike! My bike came in yesterday and I assembled it. Noticed that the wheel needed truing so did that for a couple of hours, adjusted the front fenders and installed the pedals, which sadly didn’t come with the bike.

But overall, the bike is sooo well made. The new Yamaha PW-ST motor is buttery smooth, so much smoother than my Bosch 2nd gen powered Xduro Urban. I can’t even tell that there is a motor as the power assist is extremely linear.

The problem now is that my wife feels that it’s too much of a bike for her and she is intimated. She not the best with riding bikes.

With that said, if anyone wants this bike who’s located in Orange County, I’ll let it go for $2600. I paid $2320 and installed the pedals and time spent assembly and truing the wheel.

If I don’t get a bite by end of today, I will just let my friend have it for my cost.
 

CHiSox

New Member
weird mine came with pedals and i got mine 2 weeks ago; BTW two posts up you said you paid $2000 so now you want a 600 profit for truing wheels?
 
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