Review of Mini "e-bike", the JackRabbit 2.0 $499

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
A fun review from Micah on Electrek... ;)


One of the things that I love about the electric bicycle industry is that there is so much room for innovation and creative design. And the JackRabbit 2.0 might be one of the best examples of out-of-the-box e-bike design I’ve seen in a long time. And boy, does it give me a chuckle too! Referred to by the company as a “mini e-bike”, the JackRabbit 2.0 lacks functional pedals and instead opts for folding foot pegs, thus making it technically more of a seated electric scooter.

Whatever you want to call it, there’s no doubt that it’s going to draw looks wherever it goes. The JackRabbit 2.0 was designed to incorporate the best advantages of both electric scooters and electric bicycles. I’m not sure it managed to snag the aesthetics of either, but at least its odd design does serve a purpose. After a successful Kickstarter brought the JackRabbit 1.0 to life two years ago, the company is back with a number of design improvements. Compared to most scooters, the JackRabbit 2.0 sports large 20″ wheels. Yet compared to most e-bikes, it also sports an ultralight weight of just 23 lb (10.4 kg).

jackrabbit 2.0


The JackRabbit 2.0 features a 300W continuous-rated hub motor that can propel the bike up to 20 mph (32 km/h). Its cute little 8A controller actually pushes a peak 336W from the 158 Wh battery comprised of 21700 cells. That’s not face-melting speed or power by any stretch of the imagination, but is better than most electric scooters or bikes in this price range.

The company claims that testing shows the battery is good for between 9 to 18 miles (14.5 to 29 km) of range, with an average of around 12 miles (20 km). So this obviously isn’t a long range commuter. Rather, the JackRabbit is designed for utility and short trips. Its lightweight and compact design make it easy to lift and stowaway like a scooter.

Part of the comical look comes from a mismatch of proportions. The rear wheel sports a fat tire for a better ride, while the front wheel rocks a narrower tire to reduce weight. The wheelbase is dramatically shortened, which results in a turning radius of just 33 inches (84 cm) – narrow enough to pull a U-ey in a hallway.
 

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BigNerd

Well-Known Member
You just beat me to this.

Not sure where this will fit other than more like a ride-able scooter. The video is interesting but I don't think I would spend $500 much less $1k on this.

Seems like their first version got backed (barely):


The redesign is better but still seems very niche.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
You just beat me to this.

Not sure where this will fit other than more like a ride-able scooter. The video is interesting but I don't think I would spend $500 much less $1k on this.

Seems like their first version got backed (barely):


The redesign is better but still seems very niche.

For only $500, I'm willing to place a bet and roll the dice! ;)

1597726225858.png
 

arcom

Active Member
Because there is no motor cut off when applying the brake, in an emergency situation one might apply the break while at the same time increasing the throttle——-a situation often encountered by those who brake their autos with the left foot.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Because there is no motor cut off when applying the brake, in an emergency situation one might apply the break while at the same time increasing the throttle——-a situation often encountered by those who brake their autos with the left foot.

Good point... gotta pay attention when riding.