Review: Pedego’s cheapest electric bike ever

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
A review from Electrek on the cheapest Pedego EBike.


Pedego has 20-something e-bikes in their lineup, which is great. Except that they range from $2k to $5.5k. That price range can still be reasonable when you factor in Pedego’s 100+ dealer network, local service/support, and a list of other factors that we’ll discuss, but that doesn’t mean that it won’t still price out much of the market that can’t afford to spend several thousand dollars on an e-bike. So to see Pedego launch the Element at a mere $1,495, it was obvious that the company was trying to become more accessible to a wider range of customers. And since I’m all about getting more people on e-bikes, that jibes well with me!


Pedego Element tech specs
  • Motor: 500W continuous, 1,000W peak rear geared hub motor
  • Top speed: 32 km/h (20 mph)
  • Range: Estimated 20-40 miles (32-64 km) depending on throttle or pedal assist riding
  • Battery: 48V 10Ah (480 Wh)
  • Weight: 57.5 lb (26 kg)
  • Brakes: Shimano BR-M375 mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 4″x20″ fat tires
  • Extras: 7-speed drivetrain with Microshift transmission, backlit LCD screen, USB charging port, waterproof connectors, kickstand
 
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BigNerd

Well-Known Member
From Electrek article:
It’s a perfectly functional e-bike, but there are no built-in lights, no rack, no fenders, no horn, no app, etc.

And you definitely don’t get premium parts like hydraulic brakes or a mid-drive motor.
[...]
Next, feature scarcity. The bike rides nicely enough, but it’s missing a few small things. Fenders would be a great addition for rainy areas, and I’d love to see an included rack to turn this bike into more of a utility e-bike. And built-in lights that run off the battery are always appreciated. The last thing I want to be doing is recharging a separate head and tail light or juggling a fistful of AAA batteries.

I actually like shopping for lights because the lights that often come with ebikes are underpowered.

The only "feature" that should probably be included is a rear rack since they differ per bike configuration but looks like you can get away with a seat post mounted rack (but that's only for low weight items).

I wonder how this goes to head-to-head with the Lectric XP, which to me seems to be the 20" value champion.
 
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Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I hope that Pedego has stopped using its absolutely stupid software that limits the speed in each level. Both my Ridgerider (now sold, thankfully) and my wife's Commuter have this asinine power level/gear limiter.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Criticism in the comments comparing the Element with the Aventon Sinch, though I disagree with some of the points raised - I've tried Microshift on a Genze 200 bikeshare rental ebike and those shifters work fine. Pedego's typically offer throttle assist from Zero, vs the Sinch requires you to be pedalling before the throttle activates - I only use the throttle on my Bafang mid-drive to get going from stationary then I use pedal assist. You do get a suspension fork and a larger battery on the Aventon Sinch, but the Pedego Element is a decent budget ebike.
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Great timing @FlatSix911! I just finished covering the Element as well, here's my review with more specs and stuff: https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/element/

Court, thanks for posting your latest review... great detail and analysis as always! ;)

EBR Summary:
  • A compact fat tire electric bike designed around a sturdy but approachable mid-step frame. With its low stand-over height and potential for low minimum saddle height, this is one of the few ebikes that works well for petite riders and even kids! The highly adjustable top-speed settings for pedal assist and throttle add safety or extend range by reducing power consumption. Optional aluminum alloy fenders, rear rack, headlight, and bags add utility.
  • Six beautiful colors allow for personalization if friends, partners, or family members each buy an Element. The removable interchangeable battery pack is fantastic because it positions weight low and center on the frame, provides powerful 48 volt power flow, and offers USB charging! There is also a USB charging port built into the base of the LCD display panel (for maintaining smartphones and other portable electronic devices). Faster 3 Amp charger included.
  • The drawbacks of smaller 20" wheels include higher attack angle and twitchy steering, but both are addressed by the high volume 20" x 4" fat tires here. These tires provide stability and an air cushion that reduces vibration and smooths bumpy terrain. The 5PSI to 30PSI pressure range can actually accommodate sand, packed, snow, and other soft terrain if lowered to 5PSI! Powerful 500W to 864W geared hub motor offers 45Nm of torque, chain guide protects pants and reduces drops, decent 7-speed cassette for comfort at different speeds.
  • The tires do not have an extra puncture resistant lining to help reduce flats. There's no suspension fork, but the bike ships with a 30.4mm to 27.2mm shim for use with an aftermarket suspension seatpost. The mechanical disc brakes require more hand effort and are less adjustable than hydraulic. Somewhat limited 12 to 28 tooth cassette.