REVIEW: QR-E 250W ELECTRIC BOOSTER BICYCLE MOTOR AND B60i AND B70 BATTERY

ebike

New Member
Title Pic2.jpg


(By a bicyclist with a common man's (not an engineer's or bicycle tech's) POV regarding bicycles and motors used to assist bicycling. In other words: Press button - how fast can it go and for how long, and will it take me up that damn hill without too much effort on my part.)


I was looking for a motor for my 20" folding bicycle which I customized with cruiser handlebars and a more comfortable seat. The bicycle seat and handlebars can be removed easily with quick releases and this makes it relatively lightweight and easy to fit into the tiny trunk of my Honda Civic with the trunk lid closed.

So when I went looking for a bicycle motor, I wanted something that would be small, lightweight and easily transportable, yet powerful enough to help me get up that occasional hill or long stretches of incline on my rides around town and outlying scenic areas filled with over 100 miles of bicycle trails, parks, lake, mountains. Oh yes, did I mention, I wanted a kit I could quickly, easily, self-install without an engineering degree or bicycle shop tech expertise.

Previously on my other bicycle - a semi-recumbent - I had installed a front drive 250watt motor. The motor and battery added an addition 8-9 pounds to the bicycle. I didn't want that much weight on my smaller folding bicycle. What I found the most appealing were the friction drive motors. But the biggest complaints about these friction drive motors were:

1. Cost - Some electric friction motor kits cost over $1000. The gas driven kits are less expensive but add a huge heavy motor (like a lawnmower size motor) on the back of your bike.

2. Bicycle tire wear from constant roller friction with the tire

3. Lack of power - not as strong as a front wheel hub motor or mid or rear wheel motor setup.

4. Noise - Loud annoying, attention attracting whirring, whining noise

5. Installation - Some kits required a lot of work and knowledge that most people who are not that knowledgable about bicycles might not possess or be inclined to get that deeply involved.

After further research, I came across Qiroll Technology based in Shanghai, China, founded in 2017 to research and develop electric motor systems. They have a number of friction bicycle motors and batteries. The model I am reviewing is the QR-E 250 Watt, with the B60i and B70 batteries. BOTH the motor and battery and cables weigh between 3-4 pounds (depending on the smaller or larger battery you choose) TOTAL. So that met my personal requirement as far as being light and easily transportable.

I ordered this off E-bay and thought it would take forever to get here from China because of the Covid crisis, but it came within 2 weeks! The kit came in 2 neatly, professionally packed boxes containing the battery and charger, mounting plates, screws, zip ties, throttle and battery cables, extra friction plates, as well as instructions. What sold me was the video of the QiRoll Kit...It looked simple - simple to install and easy to use, lightweight and relatively inexpensive compared to all the other bike motor kits I'd spent countless hours researching.

A big concern for me before ordering this kit was the length of the throttle cable as I have cruise handlebars that also needed the cable long enough to clear when I took off the handlebars to pack into my trunk. I needed at least 70 inches/178 cm. The throttle cable is 78.5"/200cm. BTW, the battery cable is 27.5"/70cm.



qiroll kit.jpg

Also included are a number of different size mounting plates and various sets of mounting plate bolts as well as zip ties and extra friction roller replacement plates.



INSTALLATION
The motor can be mounted in 2 ways to drive the rear tire. One is at the seat stays or at the chain stays where many kickstands are mounted. Since I have rear fenders the seat stay mounting method would not work. Also, because my kickstand was located at the chain stay, I had to remove it and attach a rear chain stay kickstand which actually looks better than the original that came with the bike.


Mount.jpg

Chain stay mount.

The kit comes with a several sets of various sizes and screws and allen wrench tools to do the installation. Mounting the booster motor at the correct angle for the roller contacting the tire at the chain stays should be such that the distance from the front of the booster to the tire surface is approximately 2 1/2" which also happens to be the length of the allen wrench that you use to secure the bolts through the mounting plates. Then it's simply a matter of using the other smaller allen wrench to adjust the C ring so that it is about 1/8"-3/8" away from the tire with the rotating nut loosened all the way back and the end that touches the roller should be right up against the roller. You should also make sure that the center of the roller is not askew and is contacting the middle of the tire flat on and not at an angle. After you tighten the 3 nuts, the booster motor and roller should be in the proper angle and position.


mounting plate measure.jpg


To use the motor you need to tighten up the rotating knob such that the roller is touching the tire. You'll discover the right amount of pressure for the best result. I usually turn the knob till the tire makes contact with the tire and then give it another 1/2 - 1 full turn more. It will vary on how much wobble your tire has I suppose. The trick is to get the tire in contact with the roller such that one full revolution of the tire has as much constant contact between tire and roller. You don't want too much pressure or too little as that can cause skipping or undue tire wear.


throttle and battery cables.jpg

Battery and throttle connected to motor.

Your almost through. All you have to do is connect the throttle cable and battery cable to the motor and put the battery in your water bottle holder. Finish up by neatly ziptying all the cables and you're ready to test drive.


battery mount.jpg

Battery in water bottle holder.


UNDERSTANDING AND USING THE ELECTRONIC CLUTCH MOTOR
I was a bit confused at first on how to use what I called the throttle. This by the way is mounted on the underside of the left handlebar grip. You operate it by depressing the lever with your middle or ring finger which gives you power. The button is also accessed with either finger to change the mode in which your motor will operate.


throttle.jpg

Throttle zip tied on the underside of left handgrip positioned so that ring or middle finger can press lever and reach mode button.

There is no ON/OFF switch on the battery or motor. When you want to conserve power you can go into sleep mode by holding the button for several seconds which will activate a green light on the front of the motor. Or you can turn it off completely by disconnecting the cable from the battery in your water bottle holder.

There are 3 modes:

1. GREEN LIGHT/Sleep Mode - a green light that blinks on the motor. You enter this mode by holding down the button for several seconds. You can still ride the bicycle with no motor assist in this mode.

2. RED LIGHT/Power/Pro/Sport Mode - You can wake up out of the sleep mode by pressing the lever/throttle which will instantly activate the red light which is the Power mode that gives you the highest level of boost that this thing can provde. Once you start peddling you can press the lever which will give you speeds up to 13mph without peddling and more if you do peddle. Mind you that's my personal experience with a total bike/rider weight of 200 pounds. It may vary according to your own bike weight, type of bike and your weight.

3. BLUE LIGHT/Eco Mode- This is the Economy mode in which the booster just gives you a bit of help while you peddle. You have to hold down the throttle lever. If you brake or stop it stops the roller from rolling against the tire.


motor lights.jpg

3 different color light mode indicators on the motor: green-sleep/red-power/blue-eco.


You can switch between RED/Power and BLUE/ Eco modes by pressing the button. The motor will automatically enter Green/Sleep mode after 10 minutes of inactivity/no peddling.

You can manually separate the roller from the tire by twisting the clutch knob which is used to push the roller up against the tire or separate it from it. Once you loosen the clutch knob you have to manually press the roller down to insure it is not touching the tire. You can then ride your bicycle without any motor assist.

Lets talk about drag. Since the roller is in constant contact with the tire you may be wondering about that. I can honestly say you feel no drag when you are in the Power or Eco mode, and I didn't really notice that much difference in the Green/Sleep mode either.

As far as noise, this is where this motor outshines all the other friction motors. You really don't notice it. And as I rode my bicycle around, no one turned their heads, no one seemed to notice. And if I didn't know I was the one riding the bicycle with an electric motor, I wouldn't have thought of the tiny whirring noise I barely heard either. As it is the motor (1.1 pounds) and battery (B60i/1.54 pounds) is so small and light, and tucked away at the chain stay and in the water bottle holder that people don't notice it unless they're looking for it.

On my first test ride I reached speeds of 13 mph with no peddling which is a decent speed for me. I really don't want to go too fast. With peddling it was easy to reach 18mph and probably could have gone much higher but didn't want to. That was on level paved ground. Going up a steep hill which previously took away my breath away while standing and peddling, I used the Power mode and peddled from a sitting position going up the hill at 8mph. Total distance of my first ride was about 7.5 miles and I used the Eco and Power mode interchangeably throughout the ride. Naturally the Power mode uses more battery power. But with that being said there were still 3 out of 4 battery indicator display lights lit. Remember, this is a folding bicycle with 20" wheels and 7-speed Shimano internal gear. So on a larger bicycle with more gears, you probably could reach the manufacturer's claims of 27 mph.

battery display.jpg

Battery light display

This is the manufacturer's explanation of the 4 blue battery indicator lights:
4 lights on = 100-80% power
3 lights on = 80-45%
2 lights on = 45-25%
1 light on = 25-10%
1 light flashing = 10-0%


B60andB70.jpg

BATTERIES - B60i and B70


The B60i is smaller and has less power.
Rated at 6 Amp Hours.
25 volt.
Weight 1 lb 7.7 ounces
Manufacturer claims 80% capacity after 500 full charge cycles (works out to 2-3 years -depending on usage - before 80% capacity)

The B70 is a larger battery more power
Rated at 9.8 Amp Hours
25 volt.
Weight: 2lb 6 ounces
Manufacturer claims 80% capacity after 500 full charge cycles (works out to 2-3 years -depending on usage - before 80% capacity)


Based on subsequent rides, I believe the manufacturer's claim of getting 20-30 miles on the B60i using the Eco mode (motor and peddling) to be accurate. I'd say you could depend on 25 miles out of the battery in Eco mode. I don't usually go more than 10-12 miles on one bicycle ride and the occasional 20 mile ride on level/slight incline paved road, so this is quite adequate for me.

The B70 is slightly heavier and the claim of 30-40 miles in Eco mode, also seems in the ballpark.



REQUIREMENTS and CONSIDERATIONS
The QiRoll kit seems adaptable to just about any bicycle and if in doubt the seller on Ebay suggests you send pics of your bicycle setup for advice on if and how the kit may work on your particular setup as far as stays placement, space, tire type, etc.

seatstaymount.jpg


This is how the seat stay mount looks as opposed to the chain stay mount on my bicycle.


Other things to consider is that the tire must be a relatively smooth flat (no knobbies) continuous pattern type of tire so that the roller can make the best contact with the tire. My Marathon Schwalbe's (e-bike ready) worked perfectly. The roller itself on my motor had a flat relatively smooth rubber plate unlike the abrasive almost sandpaper grit I see on other friction drive rollers. Extra rubber plates were included, in case you had to replace the one that came with the motor. Replacement is as easy as using your fingers to pry off the old rubber plate and pressing on the new one.


tires.jpg

The smoother the tire, the better the contact and effectiveness. Knobby tires won't work.

If your tire treads have a lot of grooves, these might trap gravel or little rocks and it could adversely affect the roller plate. So inspecting the tires occasionally and removing any little rock stuck in and protruding from your threads is a good idea. Personally, I haven't had any issues with this. The grooves in my tire treads don't really pick up much.

The QiRoll company claims that very little tire wear occurs with their smooth rubber plate and that it also works well should your tire get wet. I haven't tested this out too much, although the few times I went through a puddle, I noticed no slipping or decrease in performance.


CONCLUSION
This isn't the most powerful bicycle motor kit but for my 20" folding bicycle it goes fast enough and helps me get up that occasional hill or long stretch of incline. It was easy to install and easy to use. I do wish the mode indicator was on the throttle so you could easily see it on the bicycle handlebar instead of looking way down at the motor.

With that being said, I think this kit meets a lot of critical points that I mentioned at the outset earlier:

1. Cost (motor, cables, throttle, battery, charger, mounting plates, zip ties, instructions)$299-$400+ plus tax and shipping. Price may vary depending on where you buy it and what size battery is included.

2. Tire Wear: minimal if any on my Marathon Schwalbe

3. Power: Adequate for my needs...long flat roads, some inclines and occasional hills.

4. Noise: very minimal - you really don't notice and neither do other people.

5. Installation: Easy, fast (allen wrench tools provided in kit). I'm pretty fussy about cabling, I'd say arranging the cables to my picky perfection took more time than mounting the motor and adjusting clutch knob and roller on the motor.


I am in no way connected with QiRoll, just a customer. But when I find something good I don't mind sharing it with others and I'm really enjoying this motor. For those further interested you may go to the QiRoll website or search on Ebay. Here are some other videos on the Qiroll electric friction drive bike kit:

QIROLL QR - E installation w/English subtitles

QIROLL E-BIKE Electric bike kit qiroll.com

Qiroll Replace friction tape

If you have any questions about this, I will be glad to answer to the best of my knowledge. I'm a non-technical person, more of a common sense, hands on, get the job done type, so don't expect any deep engineering/electrical knowledge from me about any of this other than at the level that I've just presented.
 
Last edited:

ebike

New Member
Thanks...yes I am having fun with it. The pressure of the roller against the tire is important so that there is constant contact between tire and roller and hence the most power transfer.

The throttle could be better designed with a light indicator that shows you what mode (eco/power/sleep) you are in.

But considering it's size and price it's a keeper. The company says it's developing better improved products so they may incorporate these changes in future releases.
 

ebike

New Member
Thanks...yes I am having fun with it. The pressure of the roller against the tire is important so that there is constant contact between tire and roller and hence the most power transfer.

The throttle could be better designed with a light indicator that shows you what mode (eco/power/sleep) you are in.

But considering it's size and price it's a keeper. The company says it's developing better improved products so they may incorporate these changes in future releases.



UPDATE...

After 2 months of use, I have found the weakest point of this bicycle kit - the friction tape that comes into contact with the tire.

The tape has an expected life of about 400 miles on road use. Since I also ride some bicycle trails that are paved but have occasional spots of gravel I've found that the tape can degrade faster perhaps 250-300 miles. When the tape began to degrade it separated from the roller and there was a noise like when you were a kid and attached playing cards to your kickstand stay so it would make a noise when the spokes hit them. I couldn't figure out what the sound was until I noticed the end of the friction tape peeling off the roller. The motor still worked but I didn't like that sound as it certainly turned heads. The motor is incredibly quiet usually and no one even notices it when I'm using it.


frictiontapeold.jpg


Replacement of the tape is around $5 which isn't bad. Since i don't travel more than 2000 miles a year that works out to a possible 8 replacements of the tape or $40/year in consumables. Replacing the tape is no big deal just the removal of two bolts holding the motor on the kickstand stays (or if you have it mounted on seat stays), then peeling off the old friction tape and cleaning off any residue, then putting the new tape on.

The friction tape is made of rubber and takes the brunt of wear during use, saving your tire from wear. Frankly, I'd rather have the friction tape wear out than my tires. The tape has a smooth rubber surface and works quite well. I've seen other friction tapes on other motor kits and they look like sandpaper which must cause serious tire wear over time. The Qiroll developers of this kit are always experimenting and trying to improve things so I may test out other friction tapes they have available.

Another thing, after having been through several water puddles I did notice a slight decrease in performance as long as the wheels were wet. Slight decrease but nothing to put me off.

I'm adding one more note to this and that is when in the Power/Red Light mode, even when not peddling it feels like there is some assistance from the roller. Previously in my original review I had said that the throttle needed to be depressed to get the roller to power the tire, but I've noticed that the roller seems to auto activate at times. This leads me to believe that there is an auto-clutch that engages the roller once you reach a certain speed.
 
Last edited:

BlackHand

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Western WA
Appreciate the updates. I could see something like this in my wife's future, for the very occasional times when she wants to join in a ride.
 

ebike

New Member
Hello,

You're welcome. Around where I bike there are tons and tons of electric bikes. You know those big fat tire bike with the powerful electric engines that go 30-40mph. Those are just too fast! I don't want to go 30-40mph. In truth, I don't even want to go 20mph.

12-15mph is a good cruising speed for me and all I need to safely enjoy the ride and surroundings. There is plenty to enjoy with the river, lake, mountains, and all the trees and landscape I ride through.

I've had those more powerful bicycle motors that add another 10 pounds to your bicycle. They're ok but I'm more into a lighter, transportable type bicycle now and this suits me perfect.

IMG_5910.JPG
 

kmccune

Active Member
View attachment 57026

(By a bicyclist with a common man's (not an engineer's or bicycle tech's) POV regarding bicycles and motors used to assist bicycling. In other words: Press button - how fast can it go and for how long, and will it take me up that damn hill without too much effort on my part.)


I was looking for a motor for my 20" folding bicycle which I customized with cruiser handlebars and a more comfortable seat. The bicycle seat and handlebars can be removed easily with quick releases and this makes it relatively lightweight and easy to fit into the tiny trunk of my Honda Civic with the trunk lid closed.

So when I went looking for a bicycle motor, I wanted something that would be small, lightweight and easily transportable, yet powerful enough to help me get up that occasional hill or long stretches of incline on my rides around town and outlying scenic areas filled with over 100 miles of bicycle trails, parks, lake, mountains. Oh yes, did I mention, I wanted a kit I could quickly, easily, self-install without an engineering degree or bicycle shop tech expertise.

Previously on my other bicycle - a semi-recumbent - I had installed a front drive 250watt motor. The motor and battery added an addition 8-9 pounds to the bicycle. I didn't want that much weight on my smaller folding bicycle. What I found the most appealing were the friction drive motors. But the biggest complaints about these friction drive motors were:

1. Cost - Some electric friction motor kits cost over $1000. The gas driven kits are less expensive but add a huge heavy motor (like a lawnmower size motor) on the back of your bike.

2. Bicycle tire wear from constant roller friction with the tire

3. Lack of power - not as strong as a front wheel hub motor or mid or rear wheel motor setup.

4. Noise - Loud annoying, attention attracting whirring, whining noise

5. Installation - Some kits required a lot of work and knowledge that most people who are not that knowledgable about bicycles might not possess or be inclined to get that deeply involved.

After further research, I came across Qiroll Technology based in Shanghai, China, founded in 2017 to research and develop electric motor systems. They have a number of friction bicycle motors and batteries. The model I am reviewing is the QR-E 250 Watt, with the B60i and B70 batteries. BOTH the motor and battery and cables weigh between 3-4 pounds (depending on the smaller or larger battery you choose) TOTAL. So that met my personal requirement as far as being light and easily transportable.

I ordered this off E-bay and thought it would take forever to get here from China because of the Covid crisis, but it came within 2 weeks! The kit came in 2 neatly, professionally packed boxes containing the battery and charger, mounting plates, screws, zip ties, throttle and battery cables, extra friction plates, as well as instructions. What sold me was the video of the QiRoll Kit...It looked simple - simple to install and easy to use, lightweight and relatively inexpensive compared to all the other bike motor kits I'd spent countless hours researching.

A big concern for me before ordering this kit was the length of the throttle cable as I have cruise handlebars that also needed the cable long enough to clear when I took off the handlebars to pack into my trunk. I needed at least 70 inches/178 cm. The throttle cable is 78.5"/200cm. BTW, the battery cable is 27.5"/70cm.



View attachment 57034
Also included are a number of different size mounting plates and various sets of mounting plate bolts as well as zip ties and extra friction roller replacement plates.



INSTALLATION
The motor can be mounted in 2 ways to drive the rear tire. One is at the seat stays or at the chain stays where many kickstands are mounted. Since I have rear fenders the seat stay mounting method would not work. Also, because my kickstand was located at the chain stay, I had to remove it and attach a rear chain stay kickstand which actually looks better than the original that came with the bike.


View attachment 57037
Chain stay mount.

The kit comes with a several sets of various sizes and screws and allen wrench tools to do the installation. Mounting the booster motor at the correct angle for the roller contacting the tire at the chain stays should be such that the distance from the front of the booster to the tire surface is approximately 2 1/2" which also happens to be the length of the allen wrench that you use to secure the bolts through the mounting plates. Then it's simply a matter of using the other smaller allen wrench to adjust the C ring so that it is about 1/8"-3/8" away from the tire with the rotating nut loosened all the way back and the end that touches the roller should be right up against the roller. You should also make sure that the center of the roller is not askew and is contacting the middle of the tire flat on and not at an angle. After you tighten the 3 nuts, the booster motor and roller should be in the proper angle and position.

To use the motor you need to tighten up the rotating knob such that the roller is touching the tire. You'll discover the right amount of pressure for the best result. I usually turn the knob till the tire makes contact with the tire and then give it another 1/2 - 1 full turn more. It will vary on how much wobble your tire has I suppose. The trick is to get the tire in contact with the roller such that one full revolution of the tire has as much constant contact between tire and roller. You don't want too much pressure or too little as that can cause skipping or undue tire wear.


View attachment 57042
Battery and throttle connected to motor.

Your almost through. All you have to do is connect the throttle cable and battery cable to the motor and put the battery in your water bottle holder. Finish up by neatly ziptying all the cables and you're ready to test drive.


View attachment 57043
Battery in water bottle holder.


UNDERSTANDING AND USING THE ELECTRONIC CLUTCH MOTOR
I was a bit confused at first on how to use what I called the throttle. This by the way is mounted on the underside of the left handlebar grip. You operate it by depressing the lever with your middle or ring finger which gives you power. The button is also accessed with either finger to change the mode in which your motor will operate.


View attachment 57045
Throttle zip tied on the underside of left handgrip positioned so that ring or middle finger can press lever and reach mode button.

There is no ON/OFF switch on the battery or motor. When you want to conserve power you can go into sleep mode by holding the button for several seconds which will activate a green light on the front of the motor. Or you can turn it off completely by disconnecting the cable from the battery in your water bottle holder.

There are 3 modes:

1. GREEN LIGHT/Sleep Mode - a green light that blinks on the motor. You enter this mode by holding down the button for several seconds. You can still ride the bicycle with no motor assist in this mode.

2. RED LIGHT/Power/Pro/Sport Mode - You can wake up out of the sleep mode by pressing the lever/throttle which will instantly activate the red light which is the Power mode that gives you the highest level of boost that this thing can provde. Once you start peddling you can press the lever which will give you speeds up to 13mph without peddling and more if you do peddle. Mind you that's my personal experience with a total bike/rider weight of 200 pounds. It may vary according to your own bike weight, type of bike and your weight.

3. BLUE LIGHT/Eco Mode- This is the Economy mode in which the booster just gives you a bit of help while you peddle. You have to hold down the throttle lever. If you brake or stop it stops the roller from rolling against the tire.


View attachment 57046
3 different color light mode indicators on the motor: green-sleep/red-power/blue-eco.


You can switch between RED/Power and BLUE/ Eco modes by pressing the button. The motor will automatically enter Green/Sleep mode after 10 minutes of inactivity/no peddling.

You can manually separate the roller from the tire by twisting the clutch knob which is used to push the roller up against the tire or separate it from it. Once you loosen the clutch knob you have to manually press the roller down to insure it is not touching the tire. You can then ride your bicycle without any motor assist.

Lets talk about drag. Since the roller is in constant contact with the tire you may be wondering about that. I can honestly say you feel no drag when you are in the Power or Eco mode, and I didn't really notice that much difference in the Green/Sleep mode either.

As far as noise, this is where this motor outshines all the other friction motors. You really don't notice it. And as I rode my bicycle around, no one turned their heads, no one seemed to notice. And if I didn't know I was the one riding the bicycle with an electric motor, I wouldn't have thought of the tiny whirring noise I barely heard either. As it is the motor (1.1 pounds) and battery (B60i/1.54 pounds) is so small and light, and tucked away at the chain stay and in the water bottle holder that people don't notice it unless they're looking for it.

On my first test ride I reached speeds of 13 mph with no peddling which is a decent speed for me. I really don't want to go too fast. With peddling it was easy to reach 18mph and probably could have gone much higher but didn't want to. That was on level paved ground. Going up a steep hill which previously took away my breath away while standing and peddling, I used the Power mode and peddled from a sitting position going up the hill at 8mph. Total distance of my first ride was about 7.5 miles and I used the Eco and Power mode interchangeably throughout the ride. Naturally the Power mode uses more battery power. But with that being said there were still 3 out of 4 battery indicator display lights lit. Remember, this is a folding bicycle with 20" wheels and 7-speed Shimano internal gear. So on a larger bicycle with more gears, you probably could reach the manufacturer's claims of 27 mph.

View attachment 57047
Battery light display

This is the manufacturer's explanation of the 4 blue battery indicator lights:
4 lights on = 100-80% power
3 lights on = 80-45%
2 lights on = 45-25%
1 light on = 25-10%
1 light flashing = 10-0%


View attachment 57048
BATTERIES - B60i and B70


The B60i is smaller and has less power.
Rated at 6 Amp Hours.
25 volt.
Weight 1 lb 7.7 ounces
Manufacturer claims 80% capacity after 500 full charge cycles (works out to 2-3 years -depending on usage - before 80% capacity)

The B70 is a larger battery more power
Rated at 9.8 Amp Hours
25 volt.
Weight: 2lb 6 ounces
Manufacturer claims 80% capacity after 500 full charge cycles (works out to 2-3 years -depending on usage - before 80% capacity)


Based on subsequent rides, I believe the manufacturer's claim of getting 20-30 miles on the B60i using the Eco mode (motor and peddling) to be accurate. I'd say you could depend on 25 miles out of the battery in Eco mode. I don't usually go more than 10-12 miles on one bicycle ride and the occasional 20 mile ride on level/slight incline paved road, so this is quite adequate for me.

The B70 is slightly heavier and the claim of 30-40 miles in Eco mode, also seems in the ballpark.



REQUIREMENTS and CONSIDERATIONS
The QiRoll kit seems adaptable to just about any bicycle and if in doubt the seller on Ebay suggests you send pics of your bicycle setup for advice on if and how the kit may work on your particular setup as far as stays placement, space, tire type, etc.

View attachment 57063

This is how the seat stay mount looks as opposed to the chain stay mount on my bicycle.


Other things to consider is that the tire must be a relatively smooth flat (no knobbies) continuous pattern type of tire so that the roller can make the best contact with the tire. My Marathon Schwalbe's (e-bike ready) worked perfectly. The roller itself on my motor had a flat relatively smooth rubber plate unlike the abrasive almost sandpaper grit I see on other friction drive rollers. Extra rubber plates were included, in case you had to replace the one that came with the motor. Replacement is as easy as using your fingers to pry off the old rubber plate and pressing on the new one.


View attachment 57054
The smoother the tire, the better the contact and effectiveness. Knobby tires won't work.

If your tire treads have a lot of grooves, these might trap gravel or little rocks and it could adversely affect the roller plate. So inspecting the tires occasionally and removing any little rock stuck in and protruding from your threads is a good idea. Personally, I haven't had any issues with this. The grooves in my tire treads don't really pick up much.

The QiRoll company claims that very little tire wear occurs with their smooth rubber plate and that it also works well should your tire get wet. I haven't tested this out too much, although the few times I went through a puddle, I noticed no slipping or decrease in performance.


CONCLUSION
This isn't the most powerful bicycle motor kit but for my 20" folding bicycle it goes fast enough and helps me get up that occasional hill or long stretch of incline. It was easy to install and easy to use. I do wish the mode indicator was on the throttle so you could easily see it on the bicycle handlebar instead of looking way down at the motor.

With that being said, I think this kit meets a lot of critical points that I mentioned at the outset earlier:

1. Cost (motor, cables, throttle, battery, charger, mounting plates, zip ties, instructions)$299-$400+ plus tax and shipping. Price may vary depending on where you buy it and what size battery is included.

2. Tire Wear: minimal if any on my Marathon Schwalbe

3. Power: Adequate for my needs...long flat roads, some inclines and occasional hills.

4. Noise: very minimal - you really don't notice and neither do other people.

5. Installation: Easy, fast (allen wrench tools provided in kit). I'm pretty fussy about cabling, I'd say arranging the cables to my picky perfection took more time than mounting the motor and adjusting clutch knob and roller on the motor.


I am in no way connected with QiRoll, just a customer. But when I find something good I don't mind sharing it with others and I'm really enjoying this motor. For those further interested you may go to the QiRoll website or search on Ebay. Here are some other videos on the Qiroll electric friction drive bike kit:

QIROLL QR - E installation w/English subtitles

QIROLL E-BIKE Electric bike kit qiroll.com

Qiroll Replace friction tape

If you have any questions about this, I will be glad to answer to the best of my knowledge. I'm a non-technical person, more of a common sense, hands on, get the job done type, so don't expect any deep engineering/electrical knowledge from me about any of this other than at the level that I've just presented.
Some things I used to diss are now making more sense to me, these small units could make a great booster on a lot of bikes even ones that already have a powered main wheel, I am wondering if these small motors would stand 36 volts( my 36 volt batteries are 20 AH) or would the torque be a problem on the interface?
 

ebike

New Member
I am wondering if these small motors would stand 36 volts( my 36 volt batteries are 20 AH) or would the torque be a problem on the interface?
Hi,

Good question and the best person to ask that would be the one that sells the kits on ebay as he speaks Chinese and English and can give you an answer directly from the manufacturers of the motor. Search 'Qiroll electric bicycle kit' on ebay and contact the seller.

BTW, is the purpose of using a more powerful battery to try and get more power out of these motors which translates into greater speeds?
 

kmccune

Active Member
Hi,

Good question and the best person to ask that would be the one that sells the kits on ebay as he speaks Chinese and English and can give you an answer directly from the manufacturers of the motor. Search 'Qiroll electric bicycle kit' on ebay and contact the seller.

BTW, is the purpose of using a more powerful battery to try and get more power out of these motors which translates into greater speeds?
No, just to see what these little beauties could eat( wouldn't have to manage the stock battery- a backup or booster if you will.) I would like to use this as a "trolling motor so to speak and a boost on the really steep hills( plenty of them around here, no I do not use my Ebike as an unregistered Ecycle ,I like to slow down and enjoy the ride the only reason I do the 30+ downhill bursts is just to save the brakes. I want full suspension and regen on my next Ebike.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
Hi,

Good question and the best person to ask that would be the one that sells the kits on ebay as he speaks Chinese and English and can give you an answer directly from the manufacturers of the motor. Search 'Qiroll electric bicycle kit' on ebay and contact the seller.

BTW, is the purpose of using a more powerful battery to try and get more power out of these motors which translates into greater speeds?
Hi
Nice write up and helpful to find an actual review of the QIRoll. Like you, I cruise around the same speeds as you for same reason. Plus, my cruiser nandling is not meant for higher speeds. Good to know about the friction tape being smooth and not sandpaper.

Questions:
Now that it has been close to a year, what are your thoughts on the unit?

Any issues other than the regular replacement of the friction tape?

Do you wish you had gotten the Pro 320w version or is the 250w fine?
I know 320w peak is not a huge increase and adds 200$ to cost so may not be worth it. i just want more oomph than the 250w for thie hills to protect my knees. i know it is still only a friction drive. I do not mind walking when necessary.

I am considering either version and unliike other options i am considering that are similar, QiRoll is in stock and replies to my emails within a day. Other options may be better but if not for sale, does me no good :).

Thank you
 

ebike

New Member
Do you wish you had gotten the Pro 320w version or is the 250w fine?

I didn't even know they came out with a 320W version. Thanks for telling me. Because of all the fires and cold weather I have not been riding as much. My review stands as it is and I stand by it. It's a wonderful power assist. If the 320w version is even more powerful I'm for it!

Although I would say I have one thing to add about the motor: that on the high power throttle setting, you don't even have to press the throttle button to feel the asssit. It automatically kicks in when the wheel is moving and touching the roller. Pressing the throttle gives you even more power assist.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
I appreciate the update. Hope you can enjoy more soon.
Link for the Pro

Cons: costs 2/3 more than QRE for only 70w more peak power, probably a litlte louder
Pros: regeen braking, reverse mode H70 33V 9ah battery instead of the B70's 24ish-Volt 9ah battery

Wish they had given it more power instead of those two not too useful features. (i never go in reverse on a bike ha ha)
 

ebike

New Member
I appreciate the update. Hope you can enjoy more soon.
Link for the Pro

Cons: costs 2/3 more than QRE for only 70w more peak power, probably a litlte louder
Pros: regeen braking, reverse mode H70 33V 9ah battery instead of the B70's 24ish-Volt 9ah battery

Wish they had given it more power instead of those two not too useful features. (i never go in reverse on a bike ha ha)
The qiroll is VERY quiet...it isn't till the rubber friction tape begins to come off that it makes noise as it hits the motor when it revolves. The friction tape is rated to last anywhere from 300 miles and up to 400. That's the weak point of this system. I have no double the pro model is also as quiet.

As for the regen breaking what exactly is that?

And the reverse mode I thought simply meant you could attach the battery on either side of the seat stay bars.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
I think you are right and just a two-way mounting option on the stem. I think the "reverse" means the roller will still power your bike forward if installed either side of the stem. Which makes sense.

Regen was my lazy way of saying regenerative braking which in theory means the unit will very, very slowly recharge your battery upon braking and/or hill descents where roller is still touching the wheel. I think even the most advanced systems give 10 to 15% max recharge over a long descent. I will ask QiRoll to state exact specifications/claimed max percentage to be given back (percent of battery recharged) but I am not expecting much more than 1-5%. More of a marketing gimmick that raies the $. I'd rather have 400-500w without RB.

i do like the ease of replacing the friciton tape.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
Just to confirm:
Red mode is the main power/sport mode but do you have to hold the button down the entire time like you do with the Eco mode?
Or can you release the button and the motor will stay active and running in full power mode?

I watched the youtube video by Jim Chung and he mentions that the motor will still power your wheel after releasing it. Which i think is what you've said above too but just double-checking. I want that feature as i do not want to hold the button down all the time (unless i'm in eco mode).
 

ebike

New Member
I watched the youtube video by Jim Chung and he mentions that the motor will still power your wheel after releasing it. Which i think is what you've said above too but just double-checking. I want that feature as i do not want to hold the button down all the time (unless i'm in eco mode)

The tire will engage with the motor as long as the roller is touching the tire and moving in high power mode. It will give you a slight boost. To achieve a constant full boost you must constantly depress the power button, which is no big deal as the button can be positioned conveniently underside the handle grip as shown in the pictures.

When I depress the button it is merely a matter of moving my hand a tiny bit higher on the grip and then closing my fist as I would when holding the grip such that my middle or index finger is depressing the throttle lever. To release I just release my finger and shift my grip back down normally.

I hope I explained that clearly as holding down the throttle lever is not tiring or a big deal. My finger/hand has never become tired from pushing the throttle lever and I know what you mean about that being a possible nuisance, as I have had throttles that take a lot of effort to depress.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
Thank you for the info.

I do have sensitive thumb/wrists due to tendonitis-ish stuff but qr should be ok. Maybe they will add pedal assist to the next update.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
Question:
how easy and how long does it take for you to remove the QR-E motor?

Do you think there are any weak points to the mounting system that might make regular (like 2x a day periodically) mounting and removal of motor, not safe/cause breakage of a part?

BTW:
I asked QiRoll about the specs of the regen braking. They claimed 60-70 percentage of energy can be recovered and sent to braking. basically, the motor provides some level of braking assistance rather than recharging battery. Did not provide any percentage of recharge but realistically 1-5% recharge max is what Micah (Electrek) estimates here:

So, in theory, the QIRoll Pro could provide braking assistance and reduce the force necessary to stop. Thus, extending the life of the pads and rim. If it actually does what it claims :).

Still, I'm planning on buying the Pro once I've ensured it will fit. Best option at the price and it is instock now, not months later...and much lighter and easier to carry bike upstairs to my place every day.
 

alohacrusin

New Member
Region
USA
Also, as i live on island, QiRoll mentioned i could buy the kit without the battery to allow the QiRoll to be shipped via air rather than slower sea-based shipping required for hazmat.

Anyways, this means i could buy a bigger battery as long as the spects are compatible. Cost-wise, due to shipping hazmat regulations, i will not save money going with a non-QR brand battery. It will actually cost much more. But, in the future, I might get a much bigger battery if I like the qiroll.
 

Kouzou

New Member
Region
Europe
Hello. I bought it. I put it on a tern verg d9. Exactly what I was looking for. I have a question. Does anyone know approximate motor life?now order the b70 battery for spare and long distance.
 

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