Ride the Glide

Timpo

Well-Known Member
So I was randomly looking at ebikes on Google and I came across this...

Looks like they're from Canada.

Super Glide 4.0

48V 40Ah battery
(dual 20Ah)
28mph



Cargoroo

48V 29Ah battery
(dual 14.5Ah)


RTG Cargoroo electric cargo bike fully loaded family bike

http://instagr.am/p/CBOcN_Dj_u-/
 
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CdnShaun

Active Member
Very interesting, thanks for the share Timpo.

I am curious how they manage the dual battery setup. As I'm learning about multiple batteries installed on my next conversion, the choices are parallel (with the voltage's must be matching at time of connection to be safe) or a switch between batteries which doesn't appear to be many options/good options out there, at least for DYI.

If anyone finds out please post in this thread here, be great to know.
 

CdnShaun

Active Member
Also interesting is the 45kmph top speed while riding around in Victoria, B.C. - as I believe the limits of 32kmph is Canada wide?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Also interesting is the 45kmph top speed while riding around in Victoria, B.C. - as I believe the limits of 32kmph is Canada wide?
I don't know but, what I can tell is that most Canadian ebikes can reach 28mph (45km/h).

HillEater, DOST, Volt, Rize, Amego, Biktrix, Surface 604, etc...

Most Canadian ebikes are Class 3, but they have Class 2 mode, which limits the bike's top speed to 32km/h.
 
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Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
Almost all Ebikes come locked in at whatever regulations there are, it's up to the end user to unlock them with a passcode, which may or may not be in the manual.
But almost every Ebike can have the 32km/20mph limit lifted, however some companies have put in low amp controllers, even if you unlock the Ebike, the controller is bottle necking the system by design, typically 15 amps.

That is why this is such important information, I would not buy a Ebike from a company that won't tell me what it is, I don't need that power for speed but only climbing grade, I unlocked my bike via it's controller but then set it back to 32km/20mph which is the legal speed where I live, and I don't need to go faster than that, but I do need the torque for hills.

This is why I think the legislation on classed Ebikes needs revision, it's not the motor or wattage or even throttle, it's the speed alone that needs regulation.
On both bike trails and the road, and if you want to be able to go with traffic at 30-55mph then you need to insure the Ebike and stay off trails where people are walking or causal riding.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Almost all Ebikes come locked in at whatever regulations there are, it's up to the end user to unlock them with a passcode, which may or may not be in the manual.
But almost every Ebike can have the 32km/20mph limit lifted, however some companies have put in low amp controllers, even if you unlock the Ebike, the controller is bottle necking the system by design, typically 15 amps.

That is why this is such important information, I would not buy a Ebike from a company that won't tell me what it is, I don't need that power for speed but only climbing grade, I unlocked my bike via it's controller but then set it back to 32km/20mph which is the legal speed where I live, and I don't need to go faster than that, but I do need the torque for hills.

This is why I think the legislation on classed Ebikes needs revision, it's not the motor or wattage or even throttle, it's the speed alone that needs regulation.
On both bike trails and the road, and if you want to be able to go with traffic at 30-55mph then you need to insure the Ebike and stay off trails where people are walking or causal riding.
I can't think of a Canadian company that's putting low amp controller.
Rumor says Rad Power puts lower amp controller, but Rad Power isn't a Canadian company.

Also, I don't think people would try to go at the top speed speed in the trail where there are joggers, walkers, etc.

55mph is ridiculous, but 30mph?
Spandex warriors on roadbikes have been going 30mph for decades.

If you're in traffic, going slower than traffic is actually more dangerous than going slow.
For example, if cars are travelling at 50km/h or 60km/h, it's not safe to ride at 12km/h.
 

CdnShaun

Active Member
I don't know but, what I can tell is that most Canadian ebikes can reach 28mph (45km/h).

HillEater, DOST, Volt, Rize, Amego, Biktrix, Surface 604, etc...

Most Canadian ebikes are Class 3, but they have Class 2 mode, which limits the bike's top speed to 32km/h.
You are correct - the bikes sold here are Class 3 hardware/specs but locked down to the magical 32kmph/20mph limit.

Hopefully we will follow the countries that allow 28mph/45kmph someday and update our laws and regulations to match.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
I always cringe when I see pictures of these style bikes, hauling little kids, with those little feet dangling so, so close to that rear wheel. No carbon fiber, fiberglass or plastic guard of any kind to eliminate any possibility of those little feet going into that wheel's spokes at speed........
 

BillH

Active Member
I always cringe when I see pictures of these style bikes, hauling little kids, with those little feet dangling so, so close to that rear wheel. No carbon fiber, fiberglass or plastic guard of any kind to eliminate any possibility of those little feet going into that wheel's spokes at speed........
Actually, if you look at the photo with the bike standing by itself you can see a shield on the sides below the rack.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
You are correct - the bikes sold here are Class 3 hardware/specs but locked down to the magical 32kmph/20mph limit.

Hopefully we will follow the countries that allow 28mph/45kmph someday and update our laws and regulations to match.
No, those bikes are not "locked" to 20mph.

You can adjust the top speed by going to the settings.
 

thehoags

New Member
Almost all Ebikes come locked in at whatever regulations there are, it's up to the end user to unlock them with a passcode, which may or may not be in the manual.
But almost every Ebike can have the 32km/20mph limit lifted, however some companies have put in low amp controllers, even if you unlock the Ebike, the controller is bottle necking the system by design, typically 15 amps.

That is why this is such important information, I would not buy a Ebike from a company that won't tell me what it is, I don't need that power for speed but only climbing grade, I unlocked my bike via it's controller but then set it back to 32km/20mph which is the legal speed where I live, and I don't need to go faster than that, but I do need the torque for hills.

This is why I think the legislation on classed Ebikes needs revision, it's not the motor or wattage or even throttle, it's the speed alone that needs regulation.
On both bike trails and the road, and if you want to be able to go with traffic at 30-55mph then you need to insure the Ebike and stay off trails where people are walking or causal riding.

I agree with you. The 500 watt limit in Canada is outdated. I totally understand the reason behind limiting the motor assist speed to 32 km/h but I have no idea why we would need to limit the motor output power.

Of course a more powerful motor could achieve higher speeds without a limiter but it also increases torque, which is really good for acceleration and hill climbing.

My proposal would be to fully adopt the 3 class system that is used in many states and increase the motor watt limits to at least 750. In BC, the 3 class system was recently added for provincial parks but its not used to define whats street legal as of yet.

There are some cases where having a limited top speed of 32 km/h is totally reasonable but there are other cases where increasing it to 45 km/h would also be reasonable.

For example, bikes that are configured to motor assist up to 45 km/h should not be on bike paths on city park trails. Thats way too fast for those areas where there are pedestrians. In fact, I'd argue that 32 km/h is still too fast for pedestrian/bike shared trails but thats just my opinion.

But when riding on the side of the road or on road bike lanes, 45 km/h would be a reasonable limit in my opinion.

Personally, I'd be nervous going that fast but some riders would be totally comfortable with it. The benefit of the 3 class system is that it offers more flexibility for riders, instead of one broad set of rules.

Regardless, having a motor output limit seems unreasonable since the top speed can still be restricted even on a motor rated higher than 500 watts. Whats the big deal with having a more powerful motor for torque as long as the speed limit is set to 32 km/h in the settings? I don't understand it but it is what it is. At least our limit is 500 watts. Some countries are still restricted to 250 watts.
 
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Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
I agree with you. The 500 watt limit in Canada is outdated. I totally understand the reason behind limiting the motor assist speed to 32 km/h but I have no idea why we would need to limit the motor output power.

Of course a more powerful motor could achieve higher speeds without a limiter but it also increases torque, which is really good for acceleration and hill climbing.

My proposal would be to fully adopt the 3 class system that is used in many states and increase the motor watt limits to at least 750. In BC, the 3 class system was recently added for provincial parks but its not used to define whats street legal as of yet.

There are some cases where having a limited top speed of 32 km/h is totally reasonable but there are other cases where increasing it to 45 km/h would also be reasonable.

For example, bikes that are configured to motor assist up to 45 km/h should not be on bike paths on city park trails. Thats way too fast for those areas where there are pedestrians. In fact, I'd argue that 32 km/h is still too fast for pedestrian/bike shared trails but thats just my opinion.

But when riding on the side of the road or on road bike lanes, 45 km/h would be a reasonable limit in my opinion.

Personally, I'd be nervous going that fast but some riders would be totally comfortable with it. The benefit of the 3 class system is that it offers more flexibility for riders, instead of one broad set of rules.

Regardless, having a motor output limit seems unreasonable since the top speed can still be restricted even on a motor rated higher than 500 watts. Whats the big deal with having a more powerful motor for torque as long as the speed limit is set to 32 km/h in the settings? I don't understand it but it is what it is.

Yes, and this going 30Km in a school zone requires great restraint, if we can do this with cars we can do it with Ebikes.
FORD MUSTANG SHELBY GT500
 
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
I agree with you. The 500 watt limit in Canada is outdated. I totally understand the reason behind limiting the motor assist speed to 32 km/h but I have no idea why we would need to limit the motor output power.

Of course a more powerful motor could achieve higher speeds without a limiter but it also increases torque, which is really good for acceleration and hill climbing.

My proposal would be to fully adopt the 3 class system that is used in many states and increase the motor watt limits to at least 750. In BC, the 3 class system was recently added for provincial parks but its not used to define whats street legal as of yet.

There are some cases where having a limited top speed of 32 km/h is totally reasonable but there are other cases where increasing it to 45 km/h would also be reasonable.

For example, bikes that are configured to motor assist up to 45 km/h should not be on bike paths on city park trails. Thats way too fast for those areas where there are pedestrians. In fact, I'd argue that 32 km/h is still too fast for pedestrian/bike shared trails but thats just my opinion.

But when riding on the side of the road or on road bike lanes, 45 km/h would be a reasonable limit in my opinion.

Personally, I'd be nervous going that fast but some riders would be totally comfortable with it. The benefit of the 3 class system is that it offers more flexibility for riders, instead of one broad set of rules.

Regardless, having a motor output limit seems unreasonable since the top speed can still be restricted even on a motor rated higher than 500 watts. Whats the big deal with having a more powerful motor for torque as long as the speed limit is set to 32 km/h in the settings? I don't understand it but it is what it is. At least our limit is 500 watts. Some countries are still restricted to 250 watts.
You're assuming that people on Class 3 ebike will try to ride at 28mph (45km/h) EVERYWHERE.
This has been discussed on other threads, 99% of Class 3 riders will ride it responsibly.

I've seen this elderly gentleman riding his Stromer ST5 responsibly, and it didn't look any more dangerous than Rad Rover.

In these situations, obviously you would slow down, you do not blast through at 28mph (45km/h).

The Great Pumpkin Ride

Elkin Recreation Center - Trails & Greenways
Why are more young people testing positive for COVID-19 in Austin?


However, Class 3 is very useful when it is safe to do so, and also the extra power will let you get out of dangerous situation in traffic.

Construction at night for cycling lane

Are Juiced and Stromer the only ones making high powered commuter ...

Cycling along the Thousand Islands – GoBiking.ca
 

thehoags

New Member
You're assuming that people on Class 3 ebike will try to ride at 28mph (45km/h) EVERYWHERE.
This has been discussed on other threads, 99% of Class 3 riders will ride it responsibly.

I've seen this elderly gentleman riding his Stromer ST5 responsibly, and it didn't look any more dangerous than Rad Rover.

In these situations, obviously you would slow down, you do not blast through at 28mph (45km/h).

The Great Pumpkin Ride

Elkin Recreation Center - Trails & Greenways
Why are more young people testing positive for COVID-19 in Austin?


However, Class 3 is very useful when it is safe to do so, and also the extra power will let you get out of dangerous situation in traffic.

Construction at night for cycling lane

Are Juiced and Stromer the only ones making high powered commuter ...

Cycling along the Thousand Islands – GoBiking.ca

I fully agree with you and think you misunderstood me because I phrased it poorly. When I said:

"For example, bikes that are configured to motor assist up to 45 km/h should not be on bike paths on city park trails..."

I was not saying that everyone with a class 3 bike would ride max speed of 45km/h everywhere. I was just saying that people should not be riding at that speed on pedestrian shared bike trails. Therefore, I understand why the law would not want those type of bikes on these trails. But you do make a good point, that just because the bike is capable of reaching those speeds, doesn't mean everyone will ride it at those speeds where its unsafe and disrespectful towards pedestrians.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I fully agree with you and think you misunderstood me because I phrased it poorly. When I said:

"For example, bikes that are configured to motor assist up to 45 km/h should not be on bike paths on city park trails..."

I was not saying that everyone with a class 3 bike would ride max speed of 45km/h everywhere. I was just saying that people should not be riding at that speed on pedestrian shared bike trails. Therefore, I understand why the law would not want those type of bikes on these trails. But you do make a good point, that just because the bike is capable of reaching those speeds, doesn't mean everyone will ride it at those speeds where its unsafe and disrespectful towards pedestrians.
oh okay, thank you for the clarifications!
 

CdnShaun

Active Member
No, those bikes are not "locked" to 20mph.

You can adjust the top speed by going to the settings.
I am learning more brands are keeping the top speed as just a setting that can be end user changed. There are some brands that still do not. My experience started with Bionx which was famous for having the top speed setting only adjustable by someone with the computer software with full debug mode - even the 'dealer version' of the computer software could not change the top speed.

Ultimately the biggest concern remains the government legislation being outdated. I understand they had to start 'somewhere' originally, I only hope changes will come sooner than later for us from that level.
 

thehoags

New Member
I am learning more brands are keeping the top speed as just a setting that can be end user changed. There are some brands that still do not. My experience started with Bionx which was famous for having the top speed setting only adjustable by someone with the computer software with full debug mode - even the 'dealer version' of the computer software could not change the top speed.

Ultimately the biggest concern remains the government legislation being outdated. I understand they had to start 'somewhere' originally, I only hope changes will come sooner than later for us from that level.

This is why the 3 class system is so good. It allows for some bikes to have motor assist up to 45 km/h but they are only permitted on the road and in bike lanes on the road. They are prohibited from pedestrian/bike shared paths that are off the road. This makes total sense, because a bike going 45 km/h should not be on paths shared by pedestrians. Of course not everyone with a class 3 e bike would go 45 km/h on a path shared with pedestrians but there may be some who would, and that is why we have laws.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Very interesting, thanks for the share Timpo.

I am curious how they manage the dual battery setup. As I'm learning about multiple batteries installed on my next conversion, the choices are parallel (with the voltage's must be matching at time of connection to be safe) or a switch between batteries which doesn't appear to be many options/good options out there, at least for DYI.

If anyone finds out please post in this thread here, be great to know.
for dual battery, I think you will need some kind of module to make it work simultaneously