Ridge Rider Comparison

Snackbardan

New Member
I'm testing out a Pedego ridge rider and I'm loving everything about it except for the battery life is only okay for what I need. I've been looking at the Evo Cross and Evo 27.5 as bikes that keep good torque as well as cushion for bumpy rides but can also provide enough battery for 30+ mile rides. Do any of y'all have any other suggestions in the same <3500 price range?
 

wren

Member
Haibike, several models. Mid-drive for the torque you want.
 
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Jack Tyler

Active Member
@Snackbardan those two bikes are not terribly similar. If the Cross is of interest to you, consider reading the (very long) Juiced CrossCurrent thread as a Cross alternative, and also consider that Juiced offers 2 battery sizes now with a very large third one becoming available in the Fall. The CC offers a much smoother, linear power application because of its better torque sensor and is significantly less expensive than the Cross. You could add a Body Float or Thudbuster to either the Cross or CC and end up with much more comfort than the 27.5's larger tires provides. The 27.5's I rode - both the 2015 and 2016 models - didn't offer the linear power flow I was looking for, had a too-powerful Eco (lowest) power level and 'stuttered' a bit in the mid-teens speeds as the torque sensor was trying to figure out whether I wanted power or not (yet with me providing a very steady cadence). It really is important to do some test rides and see what you think for yourself.

As for the mileage you need - and as you likely already know - there are a large number of variables that are going to effect that, some of them will be related to your location (how prevalent are winds? is it very hilly there? what kinds of surface will you be riding on? will you be riding in colder vs. warmer weather?) while another set of variables relate to you (will you be doing full charges at the expense of battery longevity? what physical condition will you be bringing to that 30 mile ride? can you afford to replace the battery as soon as its rated capacity begins to drop...or are you planning to buy a battery that offers more initial capacity than you need, allowing you to use it longer before replacement?) Probably better to start by examining the variables and then come to some conclusions on the battery capacity you will want to have.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
The 27.5's I rode - both the 2015 and 2016 models - didn't offer the linear power flow I was looking for, had a too-powerful Eco (lowest) power level and 'stuttered' a bit in the mid-teens speeds as the torque sensor was trying to figure out whether I wanted power or not (yet with me providing a very steady cadence). It really is important to do some test rides and see what you think for yourself.

This is criticism that gets lost in the boosterism of corporate ebikes. My guess is that these should be user settings, like where you want each level to work with your pedaling, how smooth power should roll off, and under what circumstances.

The Pedego has an 11 ah battery. That's pretty decent. It just depends on how people use the power. To go 30 miles the average wh per mile is somewhere around 15, on one battery. To some extent people have to learn to ride the battery. Good instruments, like watt meters, total watt hours consumed, and so forth, would help. Like an EGT on an airplane.

I think Grin and Luna are both making small and light batteries, that can act as a reserve. I have the Luna Mini (3 lbs) and it's very handy, in a handlebar bag or seat bag. It's too bad DIY and Corpo-ebikes can't merge some of their capabilities.
 

Jack Tyler

Active Member
@George S. actually I think that's where some importer/distributors are headed, and what makes me feel encouraged by Juiced, among several other mfgrs. @Tora Harris is already working on making his cargo bike controller offer a 'turn key' interface with GRIN's Analyzer, just as he's already done with the Class 1 vs. Class 3 displays of the CrossCurrent. So it's reasonable to assume a similar option lies ahead for the CrossCurrent model, as well. I certainly hope so. I think you're 'spot on' about how handy it would be to have the option to carry a small 'get home' battery (just as smaller power boats have a 5 hp outboard to back up their main engine). And I'll bet some importer/distributors would see that capability as a product feature that would bring a sales advantage. And while I realize the origin of this next statement may impeach its validity...'How hard could it be?' After all, altering the controller wiring to accommodate a small 'back-up battery isn't like we're talking theoretical physics. The reality is that this is still an immature marketplace which has a very wide span of customer preferences & needs but still pretty shallow distribution of product. So we have to temper our expectations - for now at least - with what's reasonable to expect. And I think this is especially so with the smaller organizations with tiny workforces from which - to a point you've made before - we see some of the industry's promising innovations.

BTW EGT readings are specific to a given installation and usually provide minimal info on the engine's health. It's CHT readings that we a/c owners spend so much time staring at while fingering our worry beads. :D
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
BTW EGT readings

I remember the strange times in aviation, I guess. After 9/11 no one really wanted to own an airplane, and I had just sold mine. For five years I looked at Ultralights, thinking I might build something. I flew in several Rotax 503's, UL's like Titans, Challengers, that sort of thing. But the stuff was not that cheap or compelling. Anyway, those 2 strokes were pretty fragile and they tended to use the EGT. There's a joke about a CHT in this article.

I watched the Light Sport stuff, used to write stuff and send it to Avweb about LSA. But it happened and the UL people weren't on board. There was never any great design. The pricing was horrible. I shudder when I think of what 100 HP aircraft motors cost, for casual aviation.

At least we can tinker in the ebike arena. The costs are the opposite of sport flying, cheap stuff from China. A bit healthier too. Cheap batteries could make electric light aircraft workable. The silence would be much appreciated.

Thanks for the insights on ebikes. I think it's trouble if you set those PAS systems to one set of parameters. People can get pretty healthy in 6 months of riding, so their cadence could change a lot.
 

Jack Tyler

Active Member
Ah, 2-stroke rather than 4-stroke, @George S. Yes, different times. I saw a beautiful motor glider reviewed yesterday - the newest Stemme - that is self-launching and then all the noise goes away while you look for updrafts. Merely $350K. Seemed like a lot to make the noise go away. <s> We get that pleasure, with a bike, for a lot less.