Riese and Muller’s Sustainability Initiative

Alaskan

Well-Known Member


Often featured the very high quality, German-designed, Riese & Muller e-bikes have committed to a sustainability initiative . It’s not just their final product they want to be sustainable however, they want to extend the sustainability ethos to the whole of their production line and the running of their HQ.

Their new company headquarters’ aims to be fully CO2-neutral. Currently 80% of the total power required comes from the company’s own photo voltaic system. An additional warehouse with a second photo voltaic system is currently being built which will allow 100% of the company’s energy demand will be produced in-house from the first half of 2020.

Additional sustainability moves include an energy-efficient air conditioning system primarily based on passive measures has and a new tensioning-belt system to reduce plastic waste in the high-bay warehouse by 95%. All employees are supplied with free drinking water using reusable bottles.

R&M add ‘In addition to employing people with disabilities in-house, Riese & Müller also supports the Sonnenhof working farm in Mühltal, located in the immediate vicinity of the company’s new premises. All internal and external events at Riese & Müller have the aim of being waste-free and consciously rely on vegetarian or reduced-meat catering.’
 

dblhelix

Well-Known Member


Often featured the very high quality, German-designed, Riese & Muller e-bikes have committed to a sustainability initiative . It’s not just their final product they want to be sustainable however, they want to extend the sustainability ethos to the whole of their production line and the running of their HQ.

Their new company headquarters’ aims to be fully CO2-neutral. Currently 80% of the total power required comes from the company’s own photo voltaic system. An additional warehouse with a second photo voltaic system is currently being built which will allow 100% of the company’s energy demand will be produced in-house from the first half of 2020.

Additional sustainability moves include an energy-efficient air conditioning system primarily based on passive measures has and a new tensioning-belt system to reduce plastic waste in the high-bay warehouse by 95%. All employees are supplied with free drinking water using reusable bottles.

R&M add ‘In addition to employing people with disabilities in-house, Riese & Müller also supports the Sonnenhof working farm in Mühltal, located in the immediate vicinity of the company’s new premises. All internal and external events at Riese & Müller have the aim of being waste-free and consciously rely on vegetarian or reduced-meat catering.’
Is the fellow in the middle the low-profile Riese?
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
I think what the end users are looking for is efficient photovoltaic charging for the products!
For me: definitely not!

The way I ride, my Homage has a range of >150 km. I have yet to ride that distance but, if I wanted to exceed it, I could easily adjust power assist.

I have no need for on-the-go charging.
 
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webcurl

Active Member
The answer is yes.


I wish them the best, but I think what the end users are looking for is efficient photovoltaic charging for the products!
I think on the go solar charging is a pipe-dream until photovoltaics advance considerably or you're prepared to put a large canopy/roof over your bike or trailer.
For non on the go charging it would be nice if Bosch would re-invent (or even just start making it again) their 12V Travel charger and make it flexible to allow up to 4 or 6A charging.
I have spent a fortune on a setup that consists of 2 x P3 Solar 125W panels, Victron charge controller, Inverter, buffer battery & Bosch Compact charger (2A) and with the 2 panels it all weighs in at 5.8kg, 4.1kg with only one panel. This would need more than a full day of sun to charge 1000Wh from empty to full :(
But this setup is far from efficient.
 
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Cerby

New Member
I wish them the best, but I think what the end users are looking for is efficient photovoltaic charging for the products!
I don't fully agree.
The company's goal is also to pursue a better future for all.

I drive a methane car. I have half the horses, half of the range and half the interior space, but I'm proud of these drawbacks.
If I only looked at my point of view, I'd probably prefer to drive a 5000cc SUV. (Meanwhile, I'm comfortable, then the rest of the world who cares).
I am proud not to buy food wrapped in plastic, but to bring the container from home.
I'm proud to bring my coffee in an aluminum thermos instead of a disposable plastic cup.

For me, it would be much more comfortable to produce heavy metal in the air and plastic garbage, but there are more important things than my comfort.

If I were to buy a bike with electricity produced by burning oil, I would rather spend € 100 more on a bike produced with clean energy.
This is just my point of view ...