Riese & Müller from Germany to the US

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
We just got word that our first order or Riese & Müller bikes will be arriving to the US this week and I figured I would celebrate by telling the story of how these awesome bikes made their way over here.

For the past three years I have been attending Eurobike to check out trends in the market and to find sources for new products. From the first time I saw the R&M bikes I was taken back by the designs and the attention to detail. They obviously get it. This comes as little surprise considering the way the company was founded. It was started by two MTB racers Markus Riese & Heiko Müller. They wanted a bike to take with them when they travelled but they weren't satisfied with the offerings at the time. They built the first full suspension folding bike the Birdy. The bike retained the same racey feeling they craved and it was a major success.

From here they stuck with the idea of full suspension for city bikes and considering the benefits for safety, comfort and performance. Later they started introducing electric assist until they ultimately moved to only offer electric assist bikes with the Bosch system aside for their Birdy model.

I have been begging them for years to come to the US, I even pleaded with their manufacturing partner Pacific. Last summer I got the good news that they will come to the US after several emails with Heiko. They didn't waste anytime either. They setup a booth at Interbike and have decided to participate in the Ebike Expos throughout the US. Below are some images from a tour at their Factory I did last September.

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My Fiance Marisa, Me, Heiko and the National Sales Manager Erich on the Packster

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An early prototype of the Birdy modified to use on the mountains in the winter


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Lot's of Bosch motors

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Heiko setting up a Delite for Marisa to test ride

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While we were visiting they were in the middle of expanding their warehouse. This is part of it. They are super dialed in with their parts and organization. Something like what you would see at Amazon.


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This is a container at the back of their warehouse being loaded for shipping. They fill 1+ of these per day.

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This is Sandra Heiko's wife with my soon to be wife Marisa.

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Another view of the assembly area.

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Some bikes that just arrived back from the Eurobike show.

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A Delite being assembled in the R&M way. Having visited some factories in Taiwan I was thoroughly impressed by the way they handled things. It's what you would expect from German Engineers.

Below are some more images. Enjoy!


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Over50

Well-Known Member
Nice write up and pics! I think I spotted my Charger coming off the line. Or maybe not but still great pics. Looks like they run a well organized and clean shop. I can't remember, are their frames made there or in Asia and shipped in? Can't wait for my trip to Brooklyn to check out the bikes.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
They do have their frames made in Asia. Mostly through long standing partnership with Pacific Cycles in Taiwan. They were their original partner for the production of the Birdy and they continue to work closely together.

Looking forward to your visit!
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Had a nice visit at Propel in Brooklyn today. Very hospitable folks for sure. I rode the Charger with the Nuvinci hub and it lives up to its billing. The bike was smooth and powerful. With the Nuvinci you can really dial-in the gearing. I can't wait to get it out on some long rides to really learn how to best combine the Bosch modes (I only tried Eco and Tour) with the Nuvinci system. So much to learn...

I didn't ride the Delite but did look it over. A gorgeous bike indeed. It looks like a dream bike for anyone interested in long distance touring or for someone with a really long commute.
 

E-Wheels

Well-Known Member
Had a nice visit at Propel in Brooklyn today. Very hospitable folks for sure. I rode the Charger with the Nuvinci hub and it lives up to its billing. The bike was smooth and powerful. With the Nuvinci you can really dial-in the gearing. I can't wait to get it out on some long rides to really learn how to best combine the Bosch modes (I only tried Eco and Tour) with the Nuvinci system. So much to learn...

I didn't ride the Delite but did look it over. A gorgeous bike indeed. It looks like a dream bike for anyone interested in long distance touring or for someone with a really long commute.
Thanks for the feed back @Over50. The R&M Charger with belt drive and Nuvinci is the bike I am considering as well. Just waiting for R&M to realise that we need an agent on the west coast of Australia (Heiko hope you are reading this) because having to travel 4,000km to Sydney or Melbourne to view and test ride isn't an option for most or to even contemplate how you would get after sales service or support. Did you find that the Nuvinci 380 hub has enough high ratio gearing. I intend to use my future ebike for commuting and was wondering if you found the highest gear range enough to maintain about 30km/hr comfortably without too higher cadence. Your bike must be due soon. Please keep us updated once you have it with photos and your first impressions
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
...Did you find that the Nuvinci 380 hub has enough high ratio gearing. I intend to use my future ebike for commuting and was wondering if you found the highest gear range enough to maintain about 30km/hr comfortably without too higher cadence. Your bike must be due soon. Please keep us updated once you have it with photos and your first impressions

I only tested the bike on a short straight-away (up and back a couple of times). No hill climbing. I will need to get out and figure out how to optimize the interaction of the Nuvinci with the Bosch system and part of that is to learn about cadence and the most efficient use of the Nuvinci. My commute doesn't have a lot of hills, moreso just gradual grade changes. This is probably ideal for the Nuvinci. What I experienced leads me to believe that for my relatively flat commute, a sustained speed of 18mph would be easy.

My test ride was on flat ground I loved the smooth, gradual change of the Nuvinci. I should see the bike before year's end and as weather permits I hope to pass along as much info and user experience as I can. Once I'm up and running as a commuter I hope to make some videos using the Garmin Virb.
 
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