Riese & Müller Introduce New Charger and Supercharger E-Bikes to the US

Echos

New Member
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WEITERSTADT, Germany - March 5, 2018 - Riese & Müller - (www.r-m.de/en-us) - manufacturer of premium E-Bikes, kicks off the 2018 season with the launch of the New Charger and Supercharger models in North America.

The New Charger and Supercharger are the first, fully integrated E-Bikes from Riese & Müller, and incorporate the Bosch PowerTube battery into the successful Charger lineup. The integration of the Bosch PowerTube creates a seamless aesthetic, with the battery blending into the downtube.

All New Charger and Supercharger models can be fitted with an optional DualBattery delivering a total of 1,000 Wh and up to 100 miles of range on a single charge. The Supercharger can house the second Bosch PowerTube battery in the top tube; the Charger DualBattery option sits atop the down tube, with no impact on performance or handling due to the unique frame shape. Riese & Müller was among the first E-Bike companies to offer DualBattery technology, ideal for all-day excursions as well as long-distance commuters and anyone who requires greater range and wants to avoid frequent charging.
“With the full integration of the Bosch PowerTube battery, the New Charger and Supercharger are new generation E-Bikes, both technologically and aesthetically,” said Heiko Müller, co-founder and CEO of Riese & Müller. “The success of our Charger range is its combination of sporty design and comfortable riding, and we've brought that to the redesign of the New Charger and Supercharger as well.”

The New Charger is Riese & Müller’s first fully integrated E-Bike design, with a Bosch PowerTube battery incorporated into the down tube and internally routed cables, preserving the classic bike look yet with all the quality and high-performance for which Riese & Müller are known. The combination of a sleek design with the signature kink in the seat stays, high performance, and comfortable riding position has earned the Charger awards from Eurobike and Red Dot. The New Charger is available in Touring (20 mph) and HS (high-speed - 28 mph) configurations, as well as Charger mountain, equipped with the Bosch Performance CX motor, 500 Wh PowerTube battery, Fox suspension fork, and off-road tires. The New Charger is available in seven different configurations and in electric red metallic, black and pearl white.

The Supercharger is a completely new E-Bike design concept, evolving the successful Charger line by incorporating not one but two Bosch PowerTube batteries into the tubes of the ultra-rigid frame. Internally routed cables and signature two-tone frame coating create a bold, seamless appearance. The Supercharger GT touring - also available in an HS (high-speed) model - offers a sporty 11-speed Shimano Deore XT derailleur. The model is also available as Supercharger mountain, featuring the 11-speed Shimano Deore XT derailleur, a Fox suspension fork and off-road tires. The Supercharger is available in electric blue metallic and urban silver metallic and in seven different configurations.

The elevated chainstays of the New Charger and Supercharger allow the addition of the quiet and low-maintenance carbon belt drive with options of adding a NuVinci or Rohloff gear hub. The New Charger is also available in a Mixte (step-through) version.

NEW CHARGER and NEW CHARGER MIXTE


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Available Configurations:

New Charger GT touring: Ultimate riding pleasure: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), Shimano Deore XT 11-speed, Shimano Deore XT disc brakes, suspension fork
New Charger GT touring HS*: Like the New Charger GT touring with a Bosch Performance Speed motor, Magura MT4 disc brakes, and assistance up to 28 mph
New Charger GH nuvinci: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), NuVinci hub gear, Gates belt drive, Shimano Deore disc brakes, Supernova lighting system
New Charger GT nuvinci HS*: Like the New Charger Nuvinci, with Bosch Performance Speed motor, Magura MT4 disc brakes, assistance up to 28 mph
New Charger mountain: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), Shimano Deore XT 11-speed, Shimano Deore XT disc brakes

New Charger Features:
  • Bosch Performance CX or Bosch Performance Speed Motor
  • 36V / 500-watt battery
  • Three Available Sizes
  • 4 Models Available
  • Available colors: Electric Blue Metallic, Urban Blue Metallic
  • MSRP: $5469 (starting price)

SUPERCHARGER

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Available Configurations:

Supercharger GT touring: Ultimate riding pleasure: Bosch Performance CX motor, Shimano Deore XT 11-speed, Shimano Deore XT disc brakes, suspension fork, assistance up to 20 mph
Supercharger GT touring HS*: Like the Supercharger GT touring with a Bosch Performance Speed motor, Magura MT4 disc brakes, and assistance up to 28 mph
Supercharger GH nuvinci: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), NuVinci hub gear, Gates belt drive, Magura MT4 disc brakes
Supercharger GT nuvinci HS*: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 28mph), NuVinci hub gear, Gates belt drive, Magura MT4 disc brakes
Supercharger GX rohloff: For trips and expeditions: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), Rohloff 14-speed hub gear, Gates belt drive, Shimano Deore XT disc brakes
Supercharger GX rohloff HS*: Like the Supercharger GX Rohloff with Bosch Performance Speed motor (assistance up to 28 mph), Magura MT4 disc brakes
Supercharger mountain: Bosch Performance CX motor (assistance up to 20 mph), Shimano Deore XT 11-speed, Fox suspension fork, Shimano Deore XT disc brakes

SuperCharger Features:
  • Bosch Performance CX or Performance Speed Motor
  • Two 36V / 500-watt batteries
  • Three Available Sizes
  • 4 Models Available
  • Available colors: Electric Blue Metallic, Urban Blue Metallic
  • MSRP: $5699 (starting price)
 

MisterM

Active Member
These are what ebikes should look like - sleek designs w/beautifully integrated batteries. Only problem is the obscene pricing...
 

SuperGoop

Active Member
Without getting in to real electrical theory, on an ebike amp-hours translate roughly into distance, voltage translates into speed. In an "all other things being equal" scenario, the bike with the higher voltage battery will be faster.
“All other things being equal”, would a 36V/13Ah battery operating at nominal ~13.3 amps from the controller be same as a 48V/10Ah battery at nominal 10 amps (performance wise)? They both have around the same Capacity and Watt output, right?

Therefore 36V system can perform as well as a 48V system if the controller allows it, right?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Speed is about the wattage or volume of electrons flowing through the wires and available to power the motor. The main restriction on wattage is the diameter of the wire. If the wire is larger diameter, voltage makes less difference as the electrons flow more freely and need less pressure to produce the same wattage. Voltage is basically the amount of pressure pushing the electrons through the wire...imagine a water hose, the more pressure the more volume coming out of the hose, assuming the same diameter hose. If too many electrons are forced through too thin a wire by higher voltage, heat is produced. Heat is energy loss in a motor system.

Voltage alone does not automatically equate with speed. A higher voltage system will function with smaller diameter wires and a more compact motor to produce equivalent power and speed. It will not necessarily deliver more speed or torque. unless everything (wires motor windings, etc.) is scaled up to take advantage of the greater voltage.
 

DDBB

Well-Known Member
volts X amps = watts.. 745 watts = 1 HP... you can get your watts with low volts and high amps or high voltage and low amps. High amps need thicker wires and high amps produce more heat so higher volts and lower amps are preferred
 
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Johnny

Well-Known Member
Higher voltage will let you get the same power under less current and that will at least decrease losses due to resistance.

So at the same power output the system operating at a higher voltage will be more efficient(you will get more miles/ less heat when travelling).

I think Bosch is trying to standardize their lineup so that batteries can be used all around that is why they are staying at 36V. For output up to 500W I don't think the difference between 48v and 36v will be significant.

The power output of my CX motor is plenty(I barely use anything other then eco mode I may even be ok with a less powerful but lighter version). I would appreciate a higher capacity battery though (800Wh would have been nice).
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
The way I see that 36v has been the standard voltage for EU spec bikes is due to the "250w" reg. Not too hard to see using the v x A mentioned that even that is pushing it depending on what the actual interpretation of the law is. If 250w was the intended limit then a 36v system running at 7A would make it legalish depending on ones interpretation of the regs.

I am not privy to what A the controllers are on the EU spec bikes but I figure they are running more like 10A at the controller across the board which is plenty for them to reach their 15.5mph legal speed. For the US market they just have had to up the A some at the controller level to assure the 20mph limit is easily reachable and to get to the 28mph level just up the A some more and adjust the speed restriction. Of course this is also able to be controlled using a CANBUS protocol BMS or tricking the system via a dongle.

Here with our higher legal limit it is more popular to use a 48v system and why bikes like RAD, Juiced etc. use that voltage in order to as mentioned use the higher voltage and lower A controller level, but even at that it is not uncommon for them to use up to 15A stock, for increased power and energy density and have the speed limiter set to legal standards. Once again it is relatively easy to overcome the legal limits via re-programming the controller manually with a wink, wink, nod, nod.

As with anything with a motor involved there are going to be different levels of power available in the same class of vehicle. Rules and regs are just guidelines that the manufacturers follow and there is plenty of aftermarket support to take it beyond those levels. As well as vehicles that surpass the regs sold on dealers floors once again with a wink and a nod and leave the onus of responsibility on the person behind the handlebars, wheel etc.
 

dadanka

Member
Agree. Price is prohibitive. Also, it seems people have some trouble with this bike. IDK if the price is justified.

Price is really high but quality of every single bolt is top level. I don't know where you have read that these bikes has troubles, because it is not true.. Every brand could have some troubles but I bet that R&M troubles are a lot less than other brands. Sincerely i think that R&M owners are pretty satisfied with their bikes and who is looking for a bike that can allow you to trust in your vehicle to go around an entire continent trip would invest in a R&M without doubt. (I am not a millionaire )
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I own two Riese & Muller Bikes, a Nevo Nuvinci GH and an Homage Rohloff HS. I have put 4,700 miles on these two bikes since early April

The design concepts are unique, well conceived and truly functional. The build quality on these bikes is the best I have ever seen. The finish is immaculate, The component choices are consistently top notch. They are both about as trouble free as one could ever ask for in an item assembled by human hands.

I have gotten what I paid for (which was a lot) and am a totally satisfied Riese & Muller owner.

I have no idea why someone would say that "People have some trouble with this bike" and wonder what information source this comes from. Other than the fact that every machine ever made occasionally gives trouble, my experience is that R&M bikes give far less trouble than most.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
I'd second and third the comments about the quality of R&M e-bikes. If you want to purchase a very high-end no compromise e-bike in North America they really are the only game in town (well, you could argue Stromer...).

When some of the high-end bike makers (e.g. Co-Motion, Sklar, Breadwinner, Open, Stinner) in the states start making e-bikes things will get interesting and I'll probably be purchasing another bike...
 

whonderfulgrace

New Member
Price is really high but quality of every single bolt is top level. I don't know where you have read that these bikes has troubles, because it is not true.. Every brand could have some troubles but I bet that R&M troubles are a lot less than other brands. Sincerely i think that R&M owners are pretty satisfied with their bikes and who is looking for a bike that can allow you to trust in your vehicle to go around an entire continent trip would invest in a R&M without doubt. (I am not a millionaire )

Hi, i read on forums on this site that owners of R&M bikes do ecperience troubles. Some soon after they get the bike. For the price I would expect better.

I paid about 2700 for my ebike. Ive had none of the problems listed by R&M owners on this site. I do nothing but ride.

Not trying to down RM, I am just sharing my thoughts.
 

whonderfulgrace

New Member
I own two Riese & Muller Bikes, a Nevo Nuvinci GH and an Homage Rohloff HS. I have put 4,700 miles on these two bikes since early April

The design concepts are unique, well conceived and truly functional. The build quality on these bikes is the best I have ever seen. The finish is immaculate, The component choices are consistently top notch. They are both about as trouble free as one could ever ask for in an item assembled by human hands.

I have gotten what I paid for (which was a lot) and am a totally satisfied Riese & Muller owner.

I have no idea why someone would say that "People have some trouble with this bike" and wonder what information source this comes from. Other than the fact that every machine ever made occasionally gives trouble, my experience is that R&M bikes give far less trouble than most.

I got the info re: troubles with this bike, from the Forums on this site.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I got the info re: troubles with this bike, from the Forums on this site.
Hi, i read on forums on this site that owners of R&M bikes do ecperience troubles. Some soon after they get the bike. For the price I would expect better.

I paid about 2700 for my ebike. Ive had none of the problems listed by R&M owners on this site. I do nothing but ride.

Not trying to down RM, I am just sharing my thoughts.
You have said that there are reports on this forum of troubles with a particular brand of bike, implying that there are more for this brand than for others. That is not an opinion. It is either true or not. Have you compared the volume of posts citing problems between several brands? Do you know how many bikes of each brand owned by the participating members here?

It is hard to assess whether one brand is more trouble prone than another based on reports on a forum. You also need to know how many of each brand of bike are represented in each of the specific brand posts, information that is not at all available.

As one who has spent quite a bit of time here, especially paying attention to any information about Riese & Muller, I haven't seen what you are citing. Maybe I have just missed it.

Although this has not been my experience, I am curious to learn more. Could you please post some links to the threads where people have posted about "troubles" to which you are referring?
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
@Alaskan, I think she is talking about this thread.

@whonderfulgrace, Yes, if you look at the known problems thread it looks like there are a lot of problems. One observation is that nearly all of those problems were solved. Another is that I think there is a strong self-selection factor here where people who spend this much money for a bike expect the bike to be perfect and also I get the sense that some dealers aren't that experienced with the more exotic components of an R&M bike. There bluntly aren't that many e-bikes out there with hydraulic disc brakes and internally geared hubs, and my own experience is that you need to do a little bit of searching and interviewing with your bike shop to make sure they are experienced with those components.

Yes, the R&M bikes are spendy. But so are Co-Motion, Sklar, and Breadwinner bikes and they don't even have a motor. From my standpoint, given what R&M offers (dual battery, Rohloff speedhub) they are the only place I can go where I can get a great adventure bike that can cover 50-60+ miles in rugged terrain over the course of a day. Like I said in a previous post, until Sklar or Co-Motion start selling e-bikes that's where I am likely to shop. @whonderfulgrace, if you are happy with your bike more power to you and if you don't need the features of an R&M bike I'd consider yourself blessed.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
@Alaskan, I think she is talking about this thread.

@whonderfulgrace, Yes, if you look at the known problems thread it looks like there are a lot of problems. One observation is that nearly all of those problems were solved. Another is that I think there is a strong self-selection factor here where people who spend this much money for a bike expect the bike to be perfect and also I get the sense that some dealers aren't that experienced with the more exotic components of an R&M bike. There bluntly aren't that many e-bikes out there with hydraulic disc brakes and internally geared hubs, and my own experience is that you need to do a little bit of searching and interviewing with your bike shop to make sure they are experienced with those components.
This is some really sage advice about finding capable people to help keep your bike in optimal readiness, not a given when a bike is has less common components and you put lots of miles on it.

As to the thread on R$M problems, as you know, there is one of those here for every brand of e-bike.
 

Dionigi

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Cruz & Pittsburgh
My take was the new member was referring to the recent supercharger thread where someone was concerned about his Rohloff hub shifting followed by belt over tension and ending with Bosch motor seals.
 
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