Riese & Muller Tinker

gumster

Member
That does indeed help... a lot! I envision riding mostly in the off-eco-tour range; when I need assistance on a hill or accelerating in traffic from stops I'd prefer to be able to leave the control in a more "adaptive" mode such as that provided by the "Flow" software. Giving up a discrete Sport mode I do not think would be of concern.

The more I think about this, the more I'm finding it difficult to understand why I would not want "Flow" even in metrapolitan usage of the Tinker. What am I missing conceptually?
 

Sonoboy

Active Member
The more I think about this, the more I'm finding it difficult to understand why I would not want "Flow" even in metrapolitan usage of the Tinker. What am I missing conceptually?
The two downsides I've read about the eMTB mode are an increase in battery usage over the three 'standard' modes, and in one of Courts YouTube videos testing a mountain bike, one rider suggested dropping out of the eMTB mode for safety. He pointed out that if you're on the edge of a cliff trail and wanted to move just slightly forward with just a 'blip' on the cranks it could be catastrophic if the system over-boosted your intentions. For regular use in a metropolitan setting, I don't see any problem.
 

gumster

Member
The two downsides I've read about the eMTB are an increase in battery usage over the three 'standard' modes, and in one of Courts YouTube videos testing a mountain bike, one rider suggested dropping out of the eMTB mode for safety. He pointed out that if you're on the edge of a cliff trail and wanted to move just slightly forward with just a 'blip' on the cranks it could be catastrophic if the system over-boosted your intentions. For regular use in a metropolitan setting, I don't see any problem.

It's funny, but,, my local bike shop owner suggested that I might have a tendency to "overthink" when considering options. The potential "blip" catastrophe does not worry me given my intended bike use; I'm too old and have too much experience breaking parts to approach cliff edges too closely. :)

The increased battery usage is of concern; I suspect, however, that where I might be concerned about running out of "juice" during a long ride I'd attend to that concern by sticking to "eco" and "tour" and avoiding selecting the third setting (between tour and turbo) that triggers eMTB.

That said, I very much appreciate your suggestions/comments; they make sense. I'd also appreciate hearing from anyone who has experience riding in the eMTB "flow" setting... !
 

Sonoboy

Active Member
Gumster, hopefully I will receive my CX equipped bike within the next two weeks and I will personally give some feedback on this feature. Like you, I mainly plan to ride in a metropolitan setting, with the occasional jaunt into the wilds doing some bike camping. Can't wait!
 

gumster

Member
Gumster, hopefully I will receive my CX equipped bike within the next two weeks and I will personally give some feedback on this feature. Like you, I mainly plan to ride in a metropolitan setting, with the occasional jaunt into the wilds doing some bike camping. Can't wait!

Mine's due in a week or so; thus, I have plenty of time for online searches (A.K.A wasting time) and asking questions. :)
 

gumster

Member
"Again with the question..." - any assessment/opinion/experience with the suspension fork on the Tinker with respect to quality? If not precisely the quality that one might desire, any suggestions for replacement?

And, while I'm on the subject of suspension, any thoughts about using the Body Float suspension seat post on the Tinker rather than the ThudBuster?
 

Sonoboy

Active Member
"Again with the question..." - any assessment/opinion/experience with the suspension fork on the Tinker with respect to quality? If not precisely the quality that one might desire, any suggestions for replacement?

And, while I'm on the subject of suspension, any thoughts about using the Body Float suspension seat post on the Tinker rather than the ThudBuster?
For what it's worth I found this old review that discusses this fork, along with comments concerning some replacements, both for better and worse. We don't know if the manufacturer has made any improvements in the interim.
http://www.mtbr.com/cat/suspension/2007-forks/spinner/grind-os-1/prd_414409_1550crx.aspx

Regarding the saddle suspension, I've not used either one but keep in mind either of these will reduce the bikes compactness factor when collapsed, if that's important for your use.
 

gumster

Member
For what it's worth I found this old review that discusses this fork, along with comments concerning some replacements, both for better and worse. We don't know if the manufacturer has made any improvements in the interim.
http://www.mtbr.com/cat/suspension/2007-forks/spinner/grind-os-1/prd_414409_1550crx.aspx

Regarding the saddle suspension, I've not used either one but keep in mind either of these will reduce the bikes compactness factor when collapsed, if that's important for your use.

The compactness issue is a good point. On the other hand, the only time I think I would be concerned about that is when placing the bike into the back of my SUV; when doing that, I might remove the seat and post (and battery and removable pedals) to make it lighter so that I can more easily lift it into the back of the car. (I admit to a measure of decrepitude with a body worse for wear.)

With respect to the 2007 reviews cited (and, thanks for citing them), they are only mildly enlightening; some of them appear to reference the adjustable version of the shock. All of them refer to a manufacture era that I believe has been significantly altered... and improved.
 

gumster

Member
I think it's not a bad idea. I can try it out next week and let you know how it goes.

I still look forward to your comments about your riding experience riding the tinker with the eMTB "flow" update (particularly if the Tinker model has the NuVinci N380 internal hub). I'm also curious about the possibility of reversing that update if, for any reason< one chooses to do so.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
I still look forward to your comments about your riding experience riding the tinker with the eMTB "flow" update (particularly if the Tinker model has the NuVinci N380 internal hub). I'm also curious about the possibility of reversing that update if, for any reason< one chooses to do so.
So I updated the bike and I think it's really nice. I didn't find myself using Sport mode too much in the past, usually it would be Eco/Tour or Turbo. I think I could get used to using the eMTB mode in the city. It seems like it might give me more of what I'm looking for, but frankly I'll need to experiment with it some more to get a more complete picture.
 

gumster

Member
It looks like I'll be able to pick up my tinker (N380 internal hub model) tomorrow. I intend to contribute my "fair share" of feedback here as I have greatly appreciated the information offered by others.

One site post suggested that the eMTB update is not reversible. Thus, I intend to use the standard eco-tour-sport-turbo software settings for at least my first week of ownership. Thus, still, I'd very much appreciate reading comments relating to the use of eMTB in the city.

Thanks, Chris et al.
 

gumster

Member
FWIW: Took my first ride on the Tinker: I like it! Brakes are smooth and progressive. Motor is powerful. Delay before power comes on is quite small (less than 1/2 pedal rotation). Bike is stable at speed (20mph). Hills "disappear"; It was fun rolling past much younger guys wearing spandex on their road bikes. :)

I do wish the fork shock was more compliant; I weigh 138lbs and suspect that the specifications for the spring provided target more generously endowed people.

I do wish the bike were lighter; putting it on a rack will not be fun.

I will buy a suspension seat post... the Kinekt BodyFloat is on my mind.

Comparing my experience with Tern's new bike, I am more than satisfied with my decision to purchase the (more expensive) Tinker.
 

gumster

Member
FWIW: But... with further attention paid during additional rides:

1. there does seem to be more friction associated with the belt drive-and-N380(evident as a vibration or "thrum" when pedaling at a cadence of about 70-80 with moderate force. I hope this diminishes as belt and hub "break in".

2. Particularly evident in Turbo mode, power seems to come on non-linearly as increasing force is applied by rider to pedals. This results in more rapid acceleration than anticipated.

I like the bike. Having a motor does not diminish exercise value! :)
 

Bill Reinhardt

New Member
gumster, thanks for all your questions, comments and sharing your experience with the bike. I too ordered a Tinker N380 back in July and should have it within the week. Looking forward to my Minneapolis to St. Paul commute being faster with flatter hills. The fact that it has "more rapid acceleration than anticipated" actually sounds pretty fun to me :)

Quick question, did it come with eMTB installed already, or are you going to have to bring it back to the dealer to get the upgrade?
 

khaikuha

New Member
Thinking of replacing a Vespa, mixte bike and Brompton (make some room in the garage!) with a Tinker and wondering how the rides are coming along at this point?
 

Bill Reinhardt

New Member
Couldn't be happier with the Tinker. It's built like a tank. You may want to hold onto the Brompton for tight-squeezes as the tinker is (while compact) quite heavy, but it rides like a regular-sized bike and is a blast to take on trails.
 

Mulga Bill

New Member
I just took delivery of my Tinker Nuvinci. It's something of a learning curve as I've never ridden an electric bike before. I fell off it on day two because I rode into a patch of Jacaranda blossoms after several days of rain. If you are familiar with Jacaranda trees then you will know that they are deadly for cyclists during their flowering season, particularly if it's been raining. Anyway I saw the jacaranda sludge on the path and took it the way I normally would on my Moulton with its skinny tyres. Wrong. The big fat tyres of the Tinker didn't cut through the sludge and find some grip but just slurped over the purple haze of rotting Jacaranda flowers and I went arse up. Lesson learned, I think.

I ordered it months ago. My impression of the Australian distributors so far is not so good but the dealers I ordered it through are excellent. They have dealt with every hurdle the distributors down south have put in my path.

https://electricbikesbrisbane.com.au

My initial impression of the Tinker is good. It rides very well and the controls for the electric assist are very easy to learn. As my daily bike for the last ten years has been a Moulton I'm well aware of the benefits of small wheels and the Tinker is no disappointment. But it sure is a lot heavier than the Moulton with its delicate Reynolds tubing. I wanted a bike I could get in the back of my car. When I picked it up I was actually able to squeeze it into my Citroën C3 with the front wheel removed but it sure waa difficult. This bike is heavy. I'll be putting it in the back of a C5 station wagon normally but even that is difficult. Looking into a bike carrier solution instead.

The ride is not as smooth as the Moulton but apart from that it's excellent. The handling is as good as any small wheel bike. (That's superior to big wheel bikes, for those of you unfamiliar with the difference.)

But the big thing is I will now dominate that damn Taringa hill I've had to ride over twice every day going to and from work.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
@Mulga Bill, nothing like a challenge that kicks you in the pants to keep you motivated :D. Try removing the battery pack for a little help on the weight. When you embrace the positives of a heavier electric bike you make the choice to stop doing one-to-one comparisons with tiny foldable non-electric bikes. It will help you find ways to make the ebike work, like an alternate carrier. Please post what carrier you choose & add a picture or two of the carrier & where you ride; we would all appreciate that.
 

gumster

Member
For what its worth, my assessment of the belt drive tinker:

I received mine just before I went on a 6 week vacation (Asia) and thus have not had an opportunity to ride it as much as I would have otherwise expected. I like it, but its not perfect. Brakes (hydraulic) are easy to modulate and have tremendous power. Hill climbing ability is superb. Functionality when riding in traffic in the city is terrific (primarily due to acceleration assistance when in tour or turbo modes). But... There's a "thrumming" sensation evident during the power portion of the cycling stroke (related, I think, to the belt drive... dealer/mechanic thinks it will diminish as the bike breaks in). Its heavy (knew that going in). Power delivery is somewhat uneven, especially in tour and turbo modes (suddenly accelerating more than I might anticipate). The front suspension is not as soft at its softest setting as I would wish (at 140 pounds funny dressed).

Though it is not perfect, I am glad I bought the bike.

(I wonder if I have the eMTB software, factory installed?...)
 

Sonoboy

Active Member
7DB0648B-840F-4EDD-A06B-3EC8B3F10D5B.png D705D696-66C3-43DC-AEC4-FC1A5BF4C151.png
(I wonder if I have the eMTB software, factory installed?...)

If you do, the easiest way to tell is to look at the bottom of the Intuvia display as you toggle thru the modes. When you enter the sport mode, eMTB will display for one second only, and then revert to whatever info data you had previously selected. See the attached photos.
 
Last edited: