Riide or Die, lol bad title

Kaldeem

Active Member
I like everything about this bike (except that it doesn't come with a display or pedal assist.)
I'm just wondering how much of a weight difference would a 500 watt motor have been over the 350 that's currently in it. I mean I've lived in DC and believe me, it's not very flat. So personally I'd like to make sure a bike has enough power to boost me if and when I need it.

(RANT)(feel free to ignore this part)
Is every bike out there made/designed for a 170 lb person? I mean 68% (one-third or 78.6 million) of adults age 20 and over are considered overweight, and more that 35% are considered obese. We want people to ride E-bikes and get a work out, why the F are all the bikes made for such a small percent of the population?
 

bikerjohn

Well-Known Member
....(RANT)(feel free to ignore this part)
Is every bike out there made/designed for a 170 lb person? I mean 68% (one-third or 78.6 million) of adults age 20 and over are considered overweight, and more that 35% are considered obese. We want people to ride E-bikes and get a work out, why the F are all the bikes made for such a small percent of the population?
There are any number of bikes that seem well suited for the heavier rider. An important factor for the rider over 200 lbs is a bike with strong wheels and tire widths not too narrow. Strong wheels need ample spokes 32-36 count, 12-13 gauge, well laced into double or triple walled rims. Tires are best no narrower than 28mm(1.1"). That fairly universally describes most e-bike kits and complete bikes. Additionally most bikes will list "max. rider weight" specs (usually over 250 lbs).
 

Kaldeem

Active Member
Thank you, I appreciate your input. I will definitely use those stats when purchasing an e bike.
 

James

Well-Known Member
To my knowledge the Stromer has a pretty high rider weight tolerance. Weight is a battery range killer however