Rize refuses to replace or pay for faulty brake pads on leisure and rx pro

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Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
In the US. Cost in Canada is $30-40 with a 4 week wait. And I would never buy tektro again. It‘s curious how many keep recommending the same video after I repeatedly said these brakes were defective and confirmed defective by the shop, and rize confirmed that tektro released a bad batch. Bedding made zero difference, cleaning made zero difference, sanding made zero difference. Only replacement made a difference. There is a point where you have to suck up the cost of new ones after the company says it won‘t cover defective pads.
I mentioned bedding as I didn't see it discussed it in any of the earlier posts. If it doesn't help you're free to ignore my comments.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I think Alaskan's post sums it up all very nicely.

I'm also thinking that if the problem was bad brake pads that the situation could be easily resolved by just buying a set of brake pads and putting them in there yourself. It's pretty easy to do. I can see if you have a hub motor that perhaps one wheel is a bit problematic.

Regarding Tektro brakes, at least the set I have on my Juiced CCS. I do find it a pain that the pads can't be taken off with the wheel still on the bike. The pads have to move towards the wheel hub, meaning the wheel has to come off in order to get them out. The Shimano SLX brakes on my MTB on the other hand move away from the hub, so I can easily take out the pads and inspect them without taking off the wheel. It's a nice feature that I prefer.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Still-
" And yes you might be able to get a higher spec bike at a lower price from Rize or Biktrix or Rad, but you have to give up something for that to happen and that something is service. "

I didn't give up anything I needed Alaskan. Not one thing! When I buy something like this it's with no expectation of service from the seller. In fact, I would prefer they not TOUCH my new toy, ever! With very few exceptions, if it needs attention it will be me that provides it.

The point remains, many people do not want or even care about service facilities.

Regarding what you call a "quality" bike that you would prefer, I prefer a "serviceable" bike as a rule. This is a personal call with no real wrong answers. Go the way that allows you to sleep best!

I feel I'm WAY ahead of the game with a "serviceable" bike that I can throw away and replace 2 or 3 times for the price of some of the "quality" bikes you prefer. Does that make me stupid, or more likely that I'll be walking while you're still riding? I don't think so.....

I do agree with several of your other points, as usual. -Al
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It's commendable that you found a strategy that works well for you. The key is that you "didn't give up anything you needed". In your case, budget, choices and expectations are all well managed and balanced. To arrive at this point take a level of self awareness and honesty about one's choices.

This thread was started by someone griping about not getting what I consider to be unreasonable expectations met. Credit where credit is due: at least the thread had a proper title for the content as contrasted with some of the flame threads, with patently unfair titles started by other malcontents.

I have to agree with you wholeheartedly, regarding one key element of a quality bike, and that is serviceability. Sometimes one component is the key differentiator in that formula. In my case that component was the Rohloff hub on a 2019 Riese & Muller. The Rohloff is a wonderful gear hub when it works, which is most of the time. It is a reputably reliable and well made component. In my case, when it started leaking oil, the poor service provided by Rohloff in North America made the bikes so undesirable that I sold it, after they finally fixed it after two months without being able to ride the bike. The other bike, a 2018 Riese & Muller with a derailleur system, is so reliable and easy to work on that it fully meets your description and the quality of the other components is so high that it rarely needs much. I put 5,000 miles on that bike last year and I expect to be riding it, with great pleasure, many years into the future.

The Bosch battery is a great example of something worth paying extra for. I have yet to hear about one needing replacement and the fact that Bosch is committed to ten years of replacement stock into the future gives it significant extra value that I think justifies its higher price.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Alaskan, I think we're on the same page. The biggest issue with your posts is they appeared to be addressed to MANY people, when it was very likely intended, or should have been, toward just one person.

We're good. Let's move on..... -Al
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Not at all. If you read my post, which I pulled down due to having stepped on too many sensitive toes, you will see that my advice was to have reasonable expectations. In other words, when you buy from someone you never met, in a place far from where you live, shopping for the lowest price, be prepared to do your own work or find someone locally and pay them to do it. Trek has ebikes as low as $1,600 and has a great reputation for service. Like I said, " it is more about people and places than price."

And yes you might be able to get a higher spec bike at a lower price from Rize or Biktrix or Rad, but you have to give up something for that to happen and that something is service. It is a pay me now or pay someone else later situation.

I get that, for some with limited budgets, this is the best, or perhaps the only choice. There are others who just focus on price rather than value...until there are problems (which occur even on the best of bikes).

Why waste time repeatedly complaining on an internet forum because you did not get the kind of excellent service you now want, but did not pay for?
I did read your post, and the part "Sorry snark boys but it is more about people and places than price." gave me the impression that since price is relatively almost immaterial to you that you don't connect with very limited budgets.
you did not get the kind of excellent service you now want, but did not pay for?
In my opinion, that isn't valid if the pads were defective. Maybe they weren't, but Rize didn't respond well. The cost of a pair of Tektro pads is very little, to keep a customer who spent thousands. As well, if it's true that they did say about the sound " After first telling me the sound was not normal, they backtracked and said it was normal. " then there is a problem. If they admit that some Tektro pads are bad, and they say the sound is abnormal, and they do not fix the problem, then there is a customer service problem.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Still-
" And yes you might be able to get a higher spec bike at a lower price from Rize or Biktrix or Rad, but you have to give up something for that to happen and that something is service. "

I didn't give up anything I needed Alaskan. Not one thing! When I buy something like this it's with no expectation of service from the seller. In fact, I would prefer they not TOUCH my new toy, ever! With very few exceptions, if it needs attention it will be me that provides it.

The point remains, many people do not want or even care about service facilities.

Regarding what you call a "quality" bike that you would prefer, I prefer a "serviceable" bike as a rule. This is a personal call with no real wrong answers. Go the way that allows you to sleep best!

I feel I'm WAY ahead of the game with a "serviceable" bike that I can throw away and replace 2 or 3 times for the price of some of the "quality" bikes you prefer. Does that make me stupid, or more likely that I'll be walking while you're still riding? I don't think so.....

I do agree with several of your other points, as usual. -Al
When I look at high priced fancy bikes I feel as though I wouldn't be able to do anything myself...I could take apart a Bafang hub motor and refurbish it, I think. I can deal with derailleurs too...not so much with the fancy bike parts.
 

Bravesst

Member
I've been in touch with Rize about the *waterfall* noise on my X. At first Pete said it's normal, and would probably go away or lessen over time. I cleaned the rotors with alcohol and it helped, but it came back. I emailed again and got a response from Mark. So, that lead me to believe it's PROBABLY NOT a *bed in* issue.

Here's my Mark's response:
*****Thank you for the update. The sound that the brakes make is actually normal on our bikes. Keep in mind that E-bikes are a bit heavier overall and typically travelling at faster speeds. When applying firmly on all of our bikes, it certainly does make a noise that's not the most pleasant. The ceramic metal compound brake pads are also a type that works better in wet conditions, but overall are a bit noisier. Here are some helpful videos regarding brakes on bikes!




It is normal to have those sort of sounds on our brakes. When you apply the brakes quite hard, there is a gurgling water flushing around sound that it makes we are well aware. Tektro has not recalled these models and they do seem to work great, it's just that it does make a sound when pressing firmly. You do not have to be concerned about the noise as it is normal, and if you wear out the coating quite evenly, it should get a bit better after it gets worked in! ***

So my question is:
Will a change of pads fix the issue, or is it a rotor issue? Does anyone know best replacement pads?
 
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Spatzi

Member
I've been in touch with Rize about the *waterfall* noise on my X. At first Pete said it's normal, and would probably go away or lessen over time. I cleaned the rotors with alcohol and it helped, but it came back. I emailed again and got a response from Mark. So, that lead me to believe it's PROBABLY NOT a *bed in* issue.

Here's my Mark's response:
*****Thank you for the update. The sound that the brakes make is actually normal on our bikes. Keep in mind that E-bikes are a bit heavier overall and typically travelling at faster speeds. When applying firmly on all of our bikes, it certainly does make a noise that's not the most pleasant. The ceramic metal compound brake pads are also a type that works better in wet conditions, but overall are a bit noisier. Here are some helpful videos regarding brakes on bikes!




It is normal to have those sort of sounds on our brakes. When you apply the brakes quite hard, there is a gurgling water flushing around sound that it makes we are well aware. Tektro has not recalled these models and they do seem to work great, it's just that it does make a sound when pressing firmly. You do not have to be concerned about the noise as it is normal, and if you wear out the coating quite evenly, it should get a bit better after it gets worked in! ***

So my question is:
Will a change of pads fix the issue, or is it a rotor issue? Does anyone know best replacement pads?

More typical Rize bs. Mark will tell you it’s normal because they don’t want to replace the pads. They will never replace the pads anyway. It is not normal. Any bike shop will tell you this. Mark himself has gone back and forth on this with me. At first he couldn‘t even recognize the sound when he heard the clip. Then he told me it was not normal. On a later call, after I was trying to get them to pay for pad replacement, he backtracked and told me it was normal.

How can Mark not recognize the sound and then claim “All our bikes make that sound.”? Unless he first heard the noise with my video and after the huge influx of calls he received regarding the same noise complaints, he was now familiar with it, and could say “All our bikes make that noise.”

Yes, a change of pads will fix the issue. I switched in jagwire deore pads and they are dead silent even after 100km.

His claim about weight and speed being a factor in making this noise normal is also bs. How does he explain that the new pads on the exact same heavy bike running at the same speeds, cures the noise problem?

update: Mark was finally fired. I suspect Rize finally noticed his name being mentioned a lot, and not in a good way, in forums and my YouTube channel. It’s a step forward.
 
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DrRx

New Member
I announce when I am applying the front and rear brakes. I replaced these deep sea diver pads with sintered Pads From jagwire. There is now ZERO noise, even after 80 km.
I'm having an identical issue with Tektro brakes on a brand new but different brand of e-bike. I'd like to try to exchange my pads for the ones that you used. Do you have any more specific information on those pads other than "sintered deore pads from jagwire"? I think your Rize has Tektro Auriga brakes, so the Shimano Deore pads fit? Also, did the shop do anything at all to the rotors on the last service visit to eliminate the noise or did they just replace the pads? Many thanks!
 
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Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
Regarding Tektro brakes, at least the set I have on my Juiced CCS. I do find it a pain that the pads can't be taken off with the wheel still on the bike. The pads have to move towards the wheel hub, meaning the wheel has to come off in order to get them out.

A work-around is the remove the caliper from the frame/fork. It is easier than having to remove the wheel, especially for a bike with a hub motor.
 

Spatzi

Member
I'm having an identical issue with Tektro brakes on a brand new but different brand of e-bike. I'd like to try to exchange my pads for the ones that you used. Do you have any more specific information on those pads other than "sintered deore pads from jagwire"? I think your Rize has Tektro Auriga brakes, so the Shimano Deore pads fit? Also, did the shop do anything at all to the rotors on the last service visit to eliminate the noise or did they just replace the pads? Many thanks!

Even the expensive replacement for tektro pads that the bike shop sold me (kool) were terrible. The first pads they put in on another bike (jagwire) were fine. The next pair (kool at $80 a pair) were garbage. The mechanic was also useless (Italian guy at reckless bikes on Davie street, Vancouver) and didn’t even align them. I had to take the bike back to a different Mechanic (same store) to fix the first idiot’s mistakes. Then the water noise started again. I took the bike back a THIRD time, to a third mechanic who tried sanding the rotors. That lasted for 2 minutes, then noisy again. He explained to me “I would have to live with it.” Never any offer to replace the s*it pads they sold me. That will be my last visit to Reckless bikes in Vancouver. You can be lucky and get your problem solved by a bike store (jagwire pads on first bike, capable mechanic) or you can have the experience that swears you off ever going to a bike shop again.

I finally bought AHL brand on amazon and installed myself. They were cheap and solved the noise problem. I also degreased the rotors and sanded Them with 200 grit paper before putting them on.

AHL 4pairs Bicycle Disc Brake Pads for Shimano M375 M395 M486 M485 M475 M416 M446 M515 M445 M525 for Tektro Aquila/Auriga Pro/Gemini/Draco
 
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Barzy

New Member
Even the expensive replacement for tektro pads that the bike shop sold me (kool) were terrible. The first pads they put in on another bike (jagwire) were fine. The next pair (kool at $80 a pair) were garbage. The mechanic was also useless (Italian guy at reckless bikes on Davie street, Vancouver) and didn’t even align them. I had to take the bike back to a different Mechanic (same store) to fix the first idiot’s mistakes. Then the water noise started again. I took the bike back a THIRD time, to a third mechanic who tried sanding the rotors. That lasted for 2 minutes, then noisy again. He explained to me “I would have to live with it.” Never any offer to replace the s*it pads they sold me. That will be my last visit to Reckless bikes in Vancouver. You can be lucky and get your problem solved by a bike store (jagwire pads on first bike, capable mechanic) or you can have the experience that swears you off ever going to a bike shop again.

I finally bought AHL brand on amazon and installed myself. They were cheap and solved the noise problem. I also degreased the rotors and sanded Them with 200 grit paper before putting them on.

AHL 4pairs Bicycle Disc Brake Pads for Shimano M375 M395 M486 M485 M475 M416 M446 M515 M445 M525 for Tektro Aquila/Auriga Pro/Gemini/Draco
$24 Canadian for 4 pairs seems like a good deal !
Thanks for the link
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Even the expensive replacement for tektro pads that the bike shop sold me (kool) were terrible. The first pads they put in on another bike (jagwire) were fine. The next pair (kool at $80 a pair) were garbage. The mechanic was also useless (Italian guy at reckless bikes on Davie street, Vancouver) and didn’t even align them. I had to take the bike back to a different Mechanic (same store) to fix the first idiot’s mistakes. Then the water noise started again. I took the bike back a THIRD time, to a third mechanic who tried sanding the rotors. That lasted for 2 minutes, then noisy again. He explained to me “I would have to live with it.” Never any offer to replace the s*it pads they sold me. That will be my last visit to Reckless bikes in Vancouver. You can be lucky and get your problem solved by a bike store (jagwire pads on first bike, capable mechanic) or you can have the experience that swears you off ever going to a bike shop again.
I finally bought AHL brand on amazon and installed myself. They were cheap and solved the noise problem. I also degreased the rotors and sanded Them with 200 grit paper before putting them on.
AHL 4pairs Bicycle Disc Brake Pads for Shimano M375 M395 M486 M485 M475 M416 M446 M515 M445 M525 for Tektro Aquila/Auriga Pro/Gemini/Draco

Congrats... when in doubt, change pads first, rotors second. ;)
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Just wondering whether @Spatzi bothered to properly bed in his brakes first after taking delivery of a new bike. It sounds like these problems could easily have been avoided if this had been done.

 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Just wondering whether @Spatzi bothered to properly bed in his brakes first after taking delivery of a new bike. It sounds like these problems could easily have been avoided if this had been done.


Correct ... https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/workshop/how-to-bed-in-new-disc-brake-pads/
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Rize, along with other bike companies would be well advised to put some information about how to properly bed in new brakes in their owner's manuals.

I have not seen that information in any manuals. Even Trek which provides a printed and bound 60 page manual, makes no mention of the need for, and how to, properly bed in new brakes.

They should assume new bikes sold are first bikes for their owners needing to be told everything, including the basics.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Just wondering whether @Spatzi bothered to properly bed in his brakes first after taking delivery of a new bike. It sounds like these problems could easily have been avoided if this had been done.

Tried suggesting that. See my post #41 above...😎
 
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