Rohloff E14mm 9mm QR on superdelite

Vin

New Member
Hello: I am about to pull the trigger on a Superdelite with Rohloff HS. One of the requirements is that I need to be able to tow the Burley Coho XC trailer. Burley uses an adapter with a 9mm QR. can someone tell me if the Superdelite uses a standard 9mm QR or is it something specific to Rohloff?
Thank you for your help.
 

M1Rate

Member
The standard skewer included with the Coho XC will work fine.

The only downside to applying the Burley Ballz to the Superdelite is that you lose the ability to lock the rear wheel with Hexlox, so you’ll have to ensure you lock the rear wheel if you reside in an urban environment and there is risk of theft.

The Rohloff, as you know, is a substantially expensive part of the bike, though I do not believe many would-be thieves yet realize this.

Finally, though the Coho XC is an excellent trailer, the advertised 70-pound+ capacity is ambitious. 50 pounds of groceries is about the max. Be sure to load heaviest items toward the Coho’s wheel (to the back) for best stability.
 

JVBulman

Member
R&M Makes a trailer hitch mount specifically for their bikes and does not recommend mounting a hitch directly to the skewer due to the shifter unit of the Rohloff getting in the way. The part number is VBK0017.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
R&M Makes a trailer hitch mount specifically for their bikes and does not recommend mounting a hitch directly to the skewer due to the shifter unit of the Rohloff getting in the way. The part number is VBK0017.
The Ballz two-sided hitch eliminates the need for the special R&M part, as it is not a drop down hitch like the one on their other models. I put the Ballz skewer on my wife's Homage Rohloff HS...perfect fit with no proximity to any other parts.
 

User54

Member
Actually all Control Technology Bikes from Riese & Müller Max not be used with single wheeled trailers. Therefore the usage of the burley YRC coho van affect the warranty of the bike.
Rather go for a two wheel based trailer.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Yet another verboten from R&M, the Apple of ebikes. Fortunately my Delight is a 2018, out of warranty. I will use my bike as I want, not as Riese & Muller tries to dictate. Products from "we don't support this" companies become less desirable no matter how pretty or well put together.

The Coho works brilliantly on my Delight. Unless someone cites a credible hazard to me or the bike from using a single wheel trailer, I'll just carry on.
 

JVBulman

Member
Yet another verboten from R&M, the Apple of ebikes. Fortunately my Delight is a 2018, out of warranty. I will use my bike as I want, not as Riese & Muller tries to dictate. Products from "we don't support this" companies become less desirable no matter how pretty or well put together.

The Coho works brilliantly on my Delight. Unless someone cites a credible hazard to me or the bike from using a single wheel trailer, I'll just carry on.
R&M's warranty conditions have more to do with German eBike regulations than anything else - Comparing it to Apple's narrow design philosophy is a bit "old man yells at cloud" if I'm being honest, and suggesting others who are still within warranty disregard the conditions is careless at best and reckless at worse.
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
R&M's warranty conditions have more to do with German eBike regulations than anything else - Comparing it to Apple's narrow design philosophy is a bit "old man yells at clouds," and suggesting others who are still within warranty to disregard the conditions is careless at best and reckless at worse.
I never suggested any such thing. I expressed my frustration with a company that endeavors to restrict how I use one of its products that I own. In another case I made a modification to a bike knowing that I was voiding my warranty. That was my choice. However I have never advocated that others do so.

And frankly the rationale that "that's what EU regulations require" is no explanation at all. Tell me why. What is the potential harm to me or my bicycle? If there is none that apply to me where I live, I will decide how to procede.
 

User54

Member
This is less something that comes from EU regulations.
This is more something that comes from what a frame can take on force put on it, and if the simulations say that on a long term the frame will not handle these forces, then that is what the math says.
As a manufacturer you then have to take the responsibility and say no to certain things even if the consumer may think the company has fun in announcing a "verbot"
Surely it's the owners bike, but should harm come through usage that does not lie within that what was permitted and approved then the owner should not complain if his warranty case is rejected.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
This is less something that comes from EU regulations.
This is more something that comes from what a frame can take on force put on it, and if the simulations say that on a long term the frame will not handle these forces, then that is what the math says.
As a manufacturer you then have to take the responsibility and say no to certain things even if the consumer may think the company has fun in announcing a "verbot"
Surely it's the owners bike, but should harm come through usage that does not lie within that what was permitted and approved then the owner should not complain if his warranty case is rejected.
Thank you for a more complete explanation. Now I understand the reasoning behind your earlier statement.

Given that my bike is out of warranty, should I decide to take the risk, any consequences are already my responsibility.
 
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