Schwalbe's new tube? Aerothan

Over50

Well-Known Member
Thoughts on Schwalbe's new tube?




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Over50

Well-Known Member
Not a tube for daily use; no real benefit to anyone except racers (or "weight weenies.") Especially given the cost.

Yes costly - as expensive as some tires. There is Schwalbe's claim of better puncture protection and vibration dampening (emphasize claim) to consider (apart from just the weight). Part of the puncture protection claim is that when they do suffer a puncture they leak air slowly. I'd be willing to try them on my Allant setup where I have the carbon rims and Tannus liners. Or on my Vado SL where I swapped the stock tires for a heavier Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus - to offset the weight gain of the tire. Assuming the correct sizes were available. But I won't swap just for the sake of swapping - I'll wait until I have a puncture or other change that requires pulling the tires off.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
My sons are already interested as backup tubes for their tubeless MTB setups. They always carry a flat kit that includes a tube, just in case. This tube is lighter, smaller, and more resistant to 'snake bite' flats at low pressures, everything they want in a backup tube. The polyurethane material should also hold pressure much longer than the 'rubber' used in conventional tubes, esp when using CO2 inflators.

$30+ is a lot for a tube, but hey, early adopters are going to go for it.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Interesting... definitely a weight weenie tube for roadies. ;)
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have been using Tubolito tubes from Austria for over a year now. The Aerothon seems to be offering many of the same benefits. On three bikes with over 9,000 miles, I have experienced one flat tire using Tubolitos. I will be most interested to read a thorough comparison of the two before I think about changing over.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
When it comes to rolling resistance and the effort it takes to get a bike moving, weight is one of the most important factors, hence the popularity of carbon fiber wheels and tubeless tires among racers. My understanding of a spinning wheel is that there are two factors effected by weight: 1) rolling resistance and 2) momentum. There is a reason that the fly wheel on any big industrial engine is the heaviest part. While it takes more energy to get it moving, once it is going the momentum of the added weight and the centrifugal force is a form of stored energy that makes it easier to keep moving. In each mechanical application that drives a spinning wheel, the optimal balance between rolling resistance and momentum is factor that needs attention.
 

Law

Active Member
Bought 2 of these and new Johnny Watts at 25% off On schwalbe site. “Holiday 25“.
 
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Luto

Active Member
The most important factor in rolling resistance is tire suppleness, I believe. (Tire suppleness absorbs the road imperfections, reducing vibration-heat generation energy dispersion.) This makes sense that an innertube decreases efficiency and is not from weight per se. Basically running two "tires".

IMO a more supple tire at the right pressure, is the best place to put your $$$. At 35-40 USD per inner tube, add an actual tire, that is getting to 70-90 USD per wheel.

Here are my next tires at a comparable price point: 700C x 38 Barlow Pass TC | Rene Herse Cycles in the ultra light version.

PS: Many articles on tires: Tires | Rene Herse Cycles
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I have been using Tubolito tubes from Austria for over a year now. The Aerothon seems to be offering many of the same benefits. On three bikes with over 9,000 miles, I have experienced one flat tire using Tubolitos. I will be most interested to read a thorough comparison of the two before I think about changing over.
I'm interested in the weight savings but also the claimed extra flat protection (vs standard tube). We (LBS and I) are building wheels for the Vado SL 5. I swapped the stock Specialized tires for the Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus which is a heavier and stiffer tire. I thought shaving some weight on the tubes could help offset the weight increase of the tire. But also that the Aerothan tubes would be a good complement for a tire that is advertised to be flat-less. Whereas on the Allant, I have the Tannus liners, I figured that Tannus+E-Plus tires would be too much weight and too much redundancy. Thus since we're building new wheels with carbon gravel rims and using the E-Plus tires - which are great in the gravel and mixed surface - I wanted to add the Aerothan tubes to the mix. I think the first reviewer that published something about them said they did improve the ride quality. He criticized their reparability but I think he used a standard glue patch - and Schwalbe sells a glue-less patch kit for these tubes. I have become a bit of a weight weenie with the Specialized given the SL motor and design intent of the bike. Last thing I wanted to do with buying a light e-bike with a light-assist motor is add a bunch of heavy components.
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
I'm interested in the weight savings but also the claimed extra flat protection (vs standard tube). We (LBS and I) are building wheels for the Vado SL 5. I swapped the stock Specialized tires for the Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus which is a heavier and stiffer tire. I thought shaving some weight on the tubes could help offset the weight increase of the tire. But also that the Aerothan tubes would be a good complement for a tire that is advertised to be flat-less. Whereas on the Allant, I have the Tannus liners, I figured that Tannus+E-Plus tires would be too much weight and too much redundancy. Thus since we're building new wheels with carbon gravel rims and using the E-Plus tires - which are great in the gravel and mixed surface - I wanted to add the Aerothan tubes to the mix. I think the first reviewer that published something about them said they did improve the ride quality. He criticized their reparability but I think he used a standard glue patch - and Schwalbe sells a glue-less patch kit for these tubes. I have become a bit of a weight weenie with the Specialized given the SL motor and design intent of the bike. Last thing I wanted to do with buying a light e-bike with a light-assist motor is add a bunch of heavy components.
Sounds like the perfect wheel/tire/tube combination for the SL.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
I'm interested in the weight savings but also the claimed extra flat protection (vs standard tube). We (LBS and I) are building wheels for the Vado SL 5. I swapped the stock Specialized tires for the Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus which is a heavier and stiffer tire. I thought shaving some weight on the tubes could help offset the weight increase of the tire. But also that the Aerothan tubes would be a good complement for a tire that is advertised to be flat-less. Whereas on the Allant, I have the Tannus liners, I figured that Tannus+E-Plus tires would be too much weight and too much redundancy. Thus since we're building new wheels with carbon gravel rims and using the E-Plus tires - which are great in the gravel and mixed surface - I wanted to add the Aerothan tubes to the mix. I think the first reviewer that published something about them said they did improve the ride quality. He criticized their reparability but I think he used a standard glue patch - and Schwalbe sells a glue-less patch kit for these tubes. I have become a bit of a weight weenie with the Specialized given the SL motor and design intent of the bike. Last thing I wanted to do with buying a light e-bike with a light-assist motor is add a bunch of heavy components.
"buying a light e-bike with a light-assist motor is add a bunch of heavy components". Makes perfect sense to keep it light all the way through. The lightest weight measurements you could achieve with add-ons seems to be the best choice. I test rode a super lightweight BH with a small 250watt motor and battery and I was gaining speed quickly from the get go. Completely different riding experience than my eMTB which is approx 45lbs, so I can understand your goal here.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
The attached article states: "Butyl is still obviously the least expensive, and latex is still the fastest". TBH I was always was under the impression that I have been purchasing "latex" tubes from my LBS most of the time. Is Butyl a very common rubber material when purchasing tubes in general? Kind of oblivious to tube materials used overall.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
The attached article states: "Butyl is still obviously the least expensive, and latex is still the fastest". TBH I was always was under the impression that I have been purchasing "latex" tubes from my LBS most of the time. Is Butyl a very common rubber material when purchasing tubes in general? Kind of oblivious to tube materials used overall.
Butyl is the most common tube you will find everywhere. Latex is lighter overall and will specifically be labelled on any tube box you buy. The problem with Latex is they leak out quicker than Butyl so will require you to check pressure everytime you start your ride. Pump up often.
Latex tubes are really only used for racing and training by pros who want the absolute least resistance.
 

Luto

Active Member
On my road bike I run tubulars and tubs all have latex inners so while they roll so much smoother than clinchers they do require pumping up pre-ride as I said
If one has never ridden Tubular tires, they don't know what that feels like. Sure clinchers are MUCH better now, but the average Tubeless clincher tire is still far below a fine (silk) tubular tire. If you add an inner tube to the clincher it is even further. The difference to me is like walking on to a tennis court with tennis shoes laced up good versus all purpose street shoes. Surely that is worth a couple of pumps of air.
 
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