Shifting Gears with Pedal Assist

WheelsOntario

New Member
I'm loving my new Téo and plan on posting my $0.02 on it shortly, but I first wanted to pose a question: what is the proper way to use the the gears? It sounds like a question with a very obvious answer, but I set my bike up and was too excited to bother reading the manual, so I missed the part where it said to never shift gears while Pedal Assist was on. It kept making a random grinding sound and the chain eventually snapped, just as the manual predicted. Bought a new chain, read the manual and... no harm, no foul.

I'm wondering, for example, what do I do if I'm in PAS 7 and gear 7 and approaching a large uphill climb? Do I have to drop down to PAS 0, then switch to gear 1, then back to PAS 7? Should I just leave it in the same gear and gun the throttle? How about starting off from a flat intersection? With a conventional bike, I'd go down to a low gear, then make my way up the gears until I reached my cruising speed at a comfortable cadence, much like a motorcycle (minus the pedalling, of course!) It feels like I need to learn a whole different way of riding to avoid the chain-destroying problem!
 

Denis Shelston

Active Member
I've never paid any special attention in shifting, as long as I am pedaling I either move up or down as needed. I'm always very smooth and 1 second between gears.

Am pretty sure I was in some PA mode as I am always in PA. I need to get in better shape before I can use PA 0

I never use the throttle while shifting though.
 

emco5

Active Member
Some PAS systems claim to be programmed to pause while you shift. That electronic 'clutch' isn't always reliable. If you want consistent, slap-free shifting with a rear hub or mid-drive, go easy. Just like with a manually-shifted derailleur on a regular bike, keep the pedals rotating but do not apply force to them while the derailleur is moving the chain to a different cog. Downshift at the approach to a hill, not while you are trying to climb and straining. Generate some momentum so you can upshift without chain load. 'Easy' works every time.
 

Falken

Active Member
I'm loving my new Téo and plan on posting my $0.02 on it shortly, but I first wanted to pose a question: what is the proper way to use the the gears? It sounds like a question with a very obvious answer, but I set my bike up and was too excited to bother reading the manual, so I missed the part where it said to never shift gears while Pedal Assist was on. It kept making a random grinding sound and the chain eventually snapped, just as the manual predicted. Bought a new chain, read the manual and... no harm, no foul.

I'm wondering, for example, what do I do if I'm in PAS 7 and gear 7 and approaching a large uphill climb? Do I have to drop down to PAS 0, then switch to gear 1, then back to PAS 7? Should I just leave it in the same gear and gun the throttle? How about starting off from a flat intersection? With a conventional bike, I'd go down to a low gear, then make my way up the gears until I reached my cruising speed at a comfortable cadence, much like a motorcycle (minus the pedalling, of course!) It feels like I need to learn a whole different way of riding to avoid the chain-destroying problem!
That's very interesting. With the way the rear hub motor works I don't see how it could put extra load on the chain. It doesn't engage the chain to rotate the wheel. The only way to put load on the chain is to pedal harder. I'm thinking maybe your rear derailer might be a little out of alignment or something? Possibly your chain is rubbing unnecessarily or maybe it was just defective? Not sure how a mid-drive system works, but that would appear to be the type that would put load on the chain to turn the wheel, since the chain is the only connection to turn the wheel.
From what I understand, you should not be shifting under load if possible. In your example of approaching a large hill in a high gear and PAS, you should shift down to a lower gear and adjust the PAS as necessary before reaching the hill. On smaller hills, the throttle can actually take the load off while down shifting, as it moves the bike up the hill and allows a down shift with hardly any load or none at all. This can be a little tricky mind you, as your thumb is gearing down you need to use your index finger to operate the throttle. This leaves 3 to hold onto the bar......not a real firm grip.
After the install of the new chain, has it had any random grinding noises again? Glad you're loving your new Teo! :)
 

WheelsOntario

New Member
After the install of the new chain, has it had any random grinding noises again? Glad you're loving your new Teo! :)
It's been great, thanks, but I've given up trying to shift when in pedal assist. Too scared, lol! Attached is the relevant section from the manual.
20170804_005800.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Something is wrong. You must be able to shift gears at will regardless of the power level you are in. The instructions are nonsense. Go visit a competent bike dealer and pay them to set up the bike properly and adjust the derailleur. The purpose of a derailleur is to allow you, at will, to change gears to suit the terrain which makes it either easy or harder to pedal. You should also be able to change power levels at will. The instructions above are written incorrectly as you do not set the speed of your bike by adjusting the derailleur. I've never heard of Teo eBikes.
 

tarhead

Member
A derailleur is actually a fairly primitive way of changing gears; it literally derails from one cog to the next with spring(s) in the body taking up or letting out slack as the ratios change. Yes you do need to ease up a bit and best to keep pedalling to get a smooth shift as noted by others. Chain stress with pedal assist is only an issue with mid-drives and some of them sense shifts and ease up automatically. You might want to check your inward and outward limit screws as your chain may have dropped right off the freewheel and jammed into the stays (high gear) or hub (low gear). The constant grinding you reported suggests that your indexing is off. This site has some great advice on how to setup your gears: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html.
 

Denis Shelston

Active Member
That's very interesting. With the way the rear hub motor works I don't see how it could put extra load on the chain. It doesn't engage the chain to rotate the wheel. The only way to put load on the chain is to pedal harder. I'm thinking maybe your rear derailer might be a little out of alignment or something? Possibly your chain is rubbing unnecessarily or maybe it was just defective? Not sure how a mid-drive system works, but that would appear to be the type that would put load on the chain to turn the wheel, since the chain is the only connection to turn the wheel :)
Thank you @Falken for this explanation. Now I get, that rear hub...
 

Jazzcat

Member
I just ease up on the pedals as I shift even going up hills. I shift before the load gets high and the pedal cadence slows down, so I'm always shifting with low load and with pedals turning fairly fast. Shift before you have to.

I've never had a problem. I suspect the derailleur is out of adjustment. Rear hub motor should have no effect on the chain drive and gears. IMHO. Hope this helps. :)
 
I'm loving my new Téo and plan on posting my $0.02 on it shortly, but I first wanted to pose a question: what is the proper way to use the the gears? It sounds like a question with a very obvious answer, but I set my bike up and was too excited to bother reading the manual, so I missed the part where it said to never shift gears while Pedal Assist was on. It kept making a random grinding sound and the chain eventually snapped, just as the manual predicted. Bought a new chain, read the manual and... no harm, no foul.

I'm wondering, for example, what do I do if I'm in PAS 7 and gear 7 and approaching a large uphill climb? Do I have to drop down to PAS 0, then switch to gear 1, then back to PAS 7? Should I just leave it in the same gear and gun the throttle? How about starting off from a flat intersection? With a conventional bike, I'd go down to a low gear, then make my way up the gears until I reached my cruising speed at a comfortable cadence, much like a motorcycle (minus the pedalling, of course!) It feels like I need to learn a whole different way of riding to avoid the chain-destroying problem!
Do you think it’s exceptable that the chain should snap at all?