Shoes and pedals, I'm confused

soyabean

Active Member
Region
Canada
to ride to and from work, grocery store and all other local errands. I will also by riding with my son and doing local forest type trails (groomed type not actual mountain type).
So how exactly are the stock pedals on your bike making you upset and unfit for the urban cycling conditions you described?
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
My take: Haibike Full FatSix that seems to spend more road time getting to short lengths of dirt trails than I care to admit. Lotsa spinning for maximum mileage out of my battery charge. Been biking on 10 speed style bikes, from a 1975 Sears Free Spirit 10 speed, to the early beginnings of mountain bikes; a BikeE recumbent bike to a Trek 9000 dual suspension mtb; their first dual suspended effort; all the way to belt drive Trek Soho DLX's and finally, onto fat tired analog bikes (Specialized FatBoy), finally, graduating to this Haibike........

From French made Christophe toeclips and straps in the 1970's and 1980's, to Shimano SPD pedals and cleats; nothing beats the ease and utility of the OneUp composite mtb pinned pedal in conjunction with my pair of Salomon SpeedCross 4 shoes. I'll never go back to anything else than this combo. Well, except in Winter riding ops, when I'll trade in the Salomon's for a pair of UnderArmour GTX FatTire Gore Tex boots (phew, biking today has become a ridiculous parade of name-dropping products!)

OneUp Composite Pedal: https://www.oneupcomponents.com/collections/pedals/products/comp-pedal

Salomon SpeedCross 4:
https://www.salomon.com/en-nl/shop-emea/product/speedcross-4-1.html#color=47022 (Note: the Salomon stock for the US changes at times, so this particular model shoe may not be available, but other variations of it, should)
 

dmourati

Member
Region
USA
City
Mountain View
If you really want to deep dive into mtb options , skip the marketing and go straight to the source of cold, hard truth - nb This is from another forum, he has more mtb knowledge in his little toe than most of us have any chance of experiencing.

View attachment 90957

I'll confess to not using any of his suggestions, but that has more to do with my deformed foot than any logical or perceived benefit from the one up components that I use.

Shoes......now the discussion gets interesting!! Here I disagree with sir Gary. He wears flexible and less grippy shoes - claiming to prefer the extra feel and to like moving his foot around. I'm not good enough for that, so I NEED grip, but also like a particular stiffness in my shank AND I NEED PROTECTION. This is non negotiable to me, having experienced the joy of crushing my foot and breaking 5 bones , I'll pay whatever it takes to feel relatively safe spinning my pedals past rocks / roots. Feet are complex structures, if you don't believe me, then invite a podiatrist over for an evening of conversation. Bring good wine and great drugs, you will need both.

So I look for shoes with impact zones ( energy absorbing padding) in the toe box as well as outer edge, with enough feel that I know where my foot is but enough stiffness that I can transfer power without foot fatigue. More importantly, they need to fit my foot - so width and torsional stiffness needs to suit my deformities.You simply can't get this information online , and to some extent you need to decide what's important. . My fiveten freeride pro's are too narrow for my feet - ie if I buy them in the size where everything else works, my mid foot gets cramped and after a couple of hours standing on the pegs my foot goes numb.

My older daughter prefers their lighter freestyle shoes, she's crazier than me and does absurd things so needs the agility but still likes grip. Those shoes are extremely comfortable to walk in, less efficient for pedalling, and offer minimal protection. They also look casual enough I'd be happy to wear them into a pub.....

For cycling in low consequence environments, I just wear a decent set of goretex lined trail running shoes. The sole isn't anywhere near as grippy as my five tens, but my pedals have more than enough studs to compensate for that. They have reasonable shank stiffness , fit my foot perfectly , are reasonably weather resistant, and reasonably ok for social outings. There isn't as much protection, but being trail running shoes they are spectacular for walking the tricky sections - ie walking the drops I probably shouldn't be riding...
Is that Gary Fisher?
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I got back into commuter cycling with an ebike after laying off for about fifteen years. Before that I rode daily for transportation/utility - on either a road bike or an mtb - for roughly 25 years. As such I was all-in with respect to being cleated into the bicycle. First via toe clips, straps and cleats, then clipless when those kinds of pedals came onto the market. So absent a few degrees of rotation on the more 'recent' clipless pedals, I was used to having my foot locked into the pedal without any worries about planting it in the right spot. The shoe cleats did that for me.

Fast forward to about 5 years ago. I get back into cycling via an ebike, going straight back to commuting daily. I dug up some old SPD pedals and walkable shoes I still had, only I seem to be much less coordinated with regard to cleating back in after a stoplight. It was driving me nuts and I was constantly being pissed off at myself. So I looked for a solution.

I'll skip the middle steps, which involved clips with no cleats, straps and no straps, half clips etc. If I solved the foot placement issue I caused some other one, and to add to it, my now much older feet had arch support issues that I could not solve with a pair of rock solid cycling shoes, since I needed to be able to walk in the same shoes now.

Solution was twofold:

1. Five Ten Freeriders. They've already been described. A sticky soled shoe that is durable, and can easily be worn all day if you must, although I keep sneakers in my office garage. But going into a store after a ride is a non-issue with a pair of them on.

2. Pedaling Innovations Catalyst pedals. they are crazy long, just looking at them. But what they do is fully support the foot's arch when you use a mid-foot position. Think of them as a larger version of a Stamp pedal. Same idea just enough that you can more easily put your whole foot onto them, where there is enough overlap and sheer size that its pretty hard to get a foot plant wrong. They are meant for MTB use but I've found them to be just as usable for street commuting. The use of different muscle groups in the revised pedal stroke takes getting used to. Especially if you are used to being cleated in and pulling back/up and pushing forward. But once you adapt, the added strength in the pedal stroke is there. I didn't appreciate how much more until I went back to another bike and had to do without. At that point I was sold on the concept.

If the price on the things gives you a rash, these RockBros pedals are about the same size as other conventional big fat flat pedals, maybe a tad larger. And $20 a pair. Your shoes won't stick to them like the steel-screw-topped Catalysts, but you can do the mid-foot stomp on them just fine.

 

Toomanycats

Active Member
Extremely well said! I'm currently teaching my new female riding companion "spinning" instead of "mashing" her crank. She cannot spin because she hasn't mastered the "smooth circular motion" technique yet.
It took me about a year, and sore knees, to figure it out. It might be easier for her to think of it as "forward and back" as in you are moving your leg forward, and kind of swinging it back up.. That's how I picked it up.
Also, if she's riding a mid drive, she might notice that spinning gets her more assist from the motor and more power in her pedal strokes.
It's a rant of mine- "mashing" = using your knee joint as a fulcrum:bad. Also, over developing your quads:bad. I know I'm pedaling right when I feel it in the backs of my legs, too.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
if she's riding a mid drive
She's riding an unpowered Haibike ;) Yet, the rules you have highlighted still hold.
she might notice that spinning gets her more assist from the motor and more power in her pedal strokes
That's the basic for my "high cadence demo" stunts for my riding buddies :D Say, I'm riding at a very low assistance level (like, 25% of maximum assistance and of the max motor power). Out of sudden, I dramatically downshift and start spinning. I accelerate as a rocket at 135-150 rpm and disappear at distance :D After rejoining the group, I explain them I hadn't changed the assistance level at all!
 

mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
I commute 25 miles each way 4 days a week on my e-bike, and flat pedals are just fine for me. I use shoes and clipless on my road bike on the weekends, but have zero use for them on my commute. for 9 miles I am on a riverbed bike pathway with no cars, the rest of the way I have to deal with traffic and have zero interest in a 65lbs e-bike buzzing at 25-30mph landing on top of me in a crash, which is what will happen with clipless pedals. might as well tie your ass to the seat also.


for my road bike it is 100% bike trails, no cars or brainless drivers (though there are some brainless cyclists). I've crashed twice on my e-bike due to the idiocy of a car driver. never once crashed on my road bike.
 

mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
by the by,, I love these pedals, they are grippy, no foot slide and you can toe up on them or flat foot on them.


the pins are replaceable (and they give you a full double set) though in 8,000 miles I have yet had to replace them.. I damaged the spindle on one in a recent crash, the pedal was fine, the spindle got boogered up, bent and striped because the crank arm got damaged. swapped the new spindle to the pedal and into a new crank arm, minimal cost thanks to the great service from the seller. I contacted them asking to buy the spindle and after explaining what happened and showing them the images of how the pedal survived they sent the spindle for free.

I use NB running shoes as my commuting footwear, light and comfortable shoes with flat soles that the pins really bite into. works well for me.
 

Formernuke

Member
Region
USA
Someone asked what I don't like about factory pedals. Not enough traction from foot to pedal.

I seriously doubt I'll go clipless as I'm not sure how I feel about riding around town and not rapidly being able to remove feet from pedals when having to dodge some idiot in a car.
 

st0ut

Member
Region
USA
This was an informative thread.

I currently have stock pedels on my ebike. Normally I ride with a firm set of keen hiking sandals.
I was considering going clipless BUT after reading this thread. I don't think that clipless is a true necessity for me.
 

Luto

Active Member
I like clips and flat combo pedals. When I want to use clips (sandal at that) I do. When I want to use flat with no clip ins, I do.

I do find you use additional muscle groups pulling up with clips. Shimano 510 (?) series and Crank brothers double shots .
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
When we're you on 714?

My PT liked that there is no movement of my ankle and that my feet are on the same place each time.
The only shoe a former nuke should be wearing is a black steel toed boondocker with wool ankle socks!! Oh yeah and you also need an NRO approved poopy suit. 🤣

All kidding aside, I’m looking at a way to integrate these magnetic pedals - no clips to deal with:

 
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