Should e-Bikes Be Tax Free?

Tax and e-Bikes?

  • Sales tax free.

    Votes: 3 30.0%
  • Tax rebate.

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • Sales tax free and rebate.

    Votes: 5 50.0%
  • No tax insentives.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    10

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Many places around the world offer tax incentives for the purchase of electric cars and some offer incentives for the purchase of a bicycle, should an ebike be free of sales tax? Should there even be more incentives than this, such as a rebate on your income tax?

Some European countries offer incentives to get people out of their automobiles, should this be world-universal? Tax income will come from somewhere, so try and think from the tax-payer point of view, rather than the e-biker point of view. I thought about this because of an article from BC, Canada.

"Leo Boon, Greater Nanaimo Cycling Coalition chairman is mounting a push to get senior government to scrap sales taxes applicable on the purchase of e-bikes. Boon said cyclists see it as a good way to encourage a green, healthy alternative to driving. That's the reason the provincial government gives incentives worth up to $5,000 off the cost of an electric vehicle."
(Link Removed - Attachment No Longer Exists)

It really makes no sense to incentivize the purchase of an electric car or a bicycle and not an electric bicycle. I just will want to know what the true cost will be and will the average tax-paying couch potato want to pay that cost. Even with incentives, governments would still benefit from taxes paid by the manufacturing and selling process (income, property, etc.) and the energy to charge batteries, the question remains would there be a net gain from increased sales.

Personally I feel that eliminating sales tax would not only help the sales of ebikes, but would also level the playing field between online sales and local bike shops.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
D. None of the above

Regular bikes have sales tax, shoes have sales tax, backpacks have sales tax, and none of these things gets a tax rebate either.

On EBR this will be a popular tax break, but in the real world, no way.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
As an alternative to an automobile it should qualify for a tax credit if the usage is for commuting/transportation. If there's one less gas-powered engine on the road or at least a greatly reduced need for 1 auto on the road, that's a good thing, which should be encouraged.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
D. None of the above

Regular bikes have sales tax, shoes have sales tax, backpacks have sales tax, and none of these things gets a tax rebate either.

On EBR this will be a popular tax break, but in the real world, no way.
Shoes, along with clothing are tax free here in MN. Each state differs. Unfortunately in the US I think it would be hard to prove a buyer is replacing their vehicle with an electric bike to warrant a tax incentive. Maybe for electric motorcycles, but that is a whole other ball game!
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
People think they are smart if they find a good used car for less money but ultimately, when more people use gas, oil, we end up paying a lot more to mitigate the ill effects of global warming.
There are people who think Tax subsidy is just wasted on these vehicles and would rather use that money for something else but that is a VERY SHORT SIGHTED view of this problem.

Did the markets predict Hurricane Katrina? ($125 billion in damages/costs)

Did they predict Hurricane Sandy? ($71 billion in damages/costs)

How about the Fukushima disaster? ($58 billion clean-up)

Typhoon Haiyan? (7,500 dead or missing and $12.5 billion in cleanup costs)

The drought in California? ($5 billion estimated loss in 2014 revenue alone)

So, who is paying for these costs? tax payer right?

Instead, one car less on the street = tons of CO2 reduction. Especially in some metros which have 10-12 month riding period, the positive effects are so much more pronounced.
I am all for tax free and rebate.

Live long and eBike :)